LARCH 7031 - Studio: Landscape Architecture (M)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2024

This studio provides opportunities for exploration of themes in contemporary landscape architecture including interrelationships with planning, ecology and infrastructure. The themes and sites will be ambitious in scale, including urban parks, post-industrial or urban renewal projects, consistent with effective consideration of the scale of ecological systems and the influence of planning policy. Models and digital modelling are typically emphasized in this studio. Students will also be introduced to extracting data using GIS software. Students will develop advanced integrated design strategies through site investigations, case studies and theoretical speculation. Advanced design resolution is required demonstrating critical application of strategic understandings to a specifically contextualised site.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code LARCH 7031
    Course Studio: Landscape Architecture (M)
    Coordinating Unit Architecture and Landscape Architecture
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Restrictions Available to M.LArch, M.Plan and M.Plan (UD) students only
    Course Description This studio provides opportunities for exploration of themes in contemporary landscape architecture including interrelationships with planning, ecology and infrastructure. The themes and sites will be ambitious in scale, including urban parks, post-industrial or urban renewal projects, consistent with effective consideration of the scale of ecological systems and the influence of planning policy. Models and digital modelling are typically emphasized in this studio. Students will also be introduced to extracting data using GIS software. Students will develop advanced integrated design strategies through site investigations, case studies and theoretical speculation. Advanced design resolution is required demonstrating critical application of strategic understandings to a specifically contextualised site.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Carlos Bartesaghi Koc

    Room Lecture Napier, G03, Lecture Theatre
    Online (Zoom)
    Studio Barr Smith South, 527, East Gallery
    Barr Smith South, 527, West Gallery
    Barr Smith South, 540a/b
    Online (Zoom)
    Technical session Online (Zoom)

    The time allocated to this course each week will be divided into:

    A. Lecture: Monday 12:00 – 13:00, wks. 1-13.
    Location: Napier, G03, Lecture Theatre
    Online (Zoom)

    B. Studio: Monday 14:00 – 18:00 wks. 1-13.
    Studio 1: Barr Smith South, 527, East Gallery
    Studio 2: Barr Smith South, 527, West Gallery
    Studio 3: Barr Smith South, 540a/b 
    Online (Zoom)

    C. Technical session: weeks 1-13.
    Technical Session 1: Online via Zoom – Friday 9:00 – 11:00 hrs, wks. 1-13.
    Technical Session 2: Online via Zoom – Friday 11:00 – 13:00 hrs, wks. 1-13.

    Coordinator / lecturer Dr Carlos Bartesaghi Koc carlos.bartesaghikoc@adelaide.edu.au 
    Studio leader Mr Rasoul Rafat rasoul.rafat@adelaide.edu.au 
    Studio leader Ms Janelle Arbon janelle.arbon@adelaide.edu.au 
    Studio leader Mr Kar Gan kar.gan@adelaide.edu.au
    Studio leader Mr Matthew Hawker  matthew.hawker@adelaide.edu.au 
    Technical assessor Mrs Juliana Croffi juliana.croffi@adelaide.edu.au 
    Technical assessor Mr Victor Calixto victor.calixto@adelaide.edu.au 
    Invited expert Dr Philip Belesky (RMIT University) philip.belesky@rmit.edu.au 
    Contributors City of Onkaparinga (Paul Harding, Janelle Arbon)
    Aerometrex (Fabrice Marre)
    N/A
    CONTACT PROTOCOL

    Please note that guest lecturers and tutors will NOT generally be available outside of studio contact hours. It is expected students fully engage with lecture content and limited studio time to reach the necessary advancement and resolution of design outcomes. For any course-related enquiry, please post an entry on the discussion board or email Dr Carlos Bartesaghi Koc on the above email.

    Individual e-mail communication with students on course issues should be kept to a minimum and for important matters only. Queries should be raised in class.

    COURSE SUPPORT STAFF AND CONTACTS

    For issues concerning enrolment s please ask ECMS at askecms@adelaide.edu.au 

    For issues related to discrimination or harassment contact
    the Course Coordinator or Velice Wennan, School Manager, 8313 5475, velice.wennan@adelaide.edu.au 

    For issues relating to health, safety, and wellbeing contact
    Ian Florance, Health, Safety and Wellbeing Officer, 8313 5978, ian.florance@adelaide.edu.au 

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    This studio provides opportunities for exploration of themes in contemporary landscape architecture including interrelationships with planning, ecology and infrastructure. The themes and sites will be ambitious in scale, including large territories, post-industrial or urban renewal projects, consistent with effective consideration of the scale of ecological systems and the influence of planning policy. Innovative techniques for assessing, simulating and modelling landscapes are typically emphasised in this studio. Students will develop advanced integrated design strategies through site investigations, case studies and theoretical speculation. Advanced design resolution is required demonstrating critical application of strategic understandings to a specifically contextualised site.

    STUDIO BRIEF: 'Extreme Territories'

    The whole world is facing an appalling climate and ecological emergency as a consequence of global warming and climate change. In the context of a changing environment, a stronger focus will be set on rural communities worldwide. In Australia, an historic record of multi-year drought, devastating bushfires, longer heatwaves and uncontrollable floods has been experienced in the South and Southeast coast of the country in 2019-2020. Given our dependence on rural areas for food and water, extensive droughts and flash floods threaten the live and subsistence of cities in future. In particular, for those living in Mediterranean climate zones, such as in South Australia, the effects of an increasingly warm and dry planet have become more evident and significant. Hence, we need to develop better strategies to plan and design territories where more heat and less water is a common thing.

    In this sense, we present LARCH7031 Landscape Architecture Studio as an introduction to ‘extreme territory design’ which will develop as new area of competence in landscape architecture and related fields, where practitioners will play an important role in future.

    The goal of this studio is to improve local climatic conditions and to mitigate the effect of extreme events (i.e. flooding, heatwaves, bushfires, droughts, sea level rise) through the purposeful eco-morphological design at multiple spatial scales. A special emphasis is put on topological, regenerative, performative and responsive approaches for the exploration of a range of strategies that respond to anticipated extreme climatic conditions in South Australia.

    In this studio, students will address extreme environmental challenges and explore the application of new and innovative technologies for the formulation of site-specific scenarios for City of Onkaparinga. The prime concern in the studio is the analysis and manipulation of the local topography, water features and vegetated elements to mitigate extreme heat, reduce flooding, mitigate bushfires and increase the capacity of water storage for future irrigation and cultivation. Students will be asked to develop a range of proposals at (1) the territory and (2) local landscape scales that envision new approaches to innovative settlement. To do so, students will use advanced and novel GIS (geographic information systems), remote sensing and cartographic methods for landscape architecture including satellite and airborne-based imagery, point clouds (LiDAR – Light detection and ranging), as well as computational tools and environmental simulations run in Rhinoceros + Grasshopper, Ceasar-Lisflood and more.

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Analyse landscapes as complex, dynamic and evolving phenomena using systems-thinking approaches.
    2. To demonstrate an understanding through design of topological, regenerative, and performative landscape architectural design processes.
    3. To apply knowledge and skills of digital technologies, advanced digital tools and techniques for the formulation of innovative design solutions.
    4. To demonstrate through design an understanding of the importance of applying an evidence-based approach to problem-solving and the value of multidisciplinary collaboration and environmental management.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1,2,3,4,5,6

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    2,3,5,6

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    2,3,5,6,

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    1,3,4,

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    5,6,

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    5,6,
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Not Applicable
    Recommended Resources
    Essential text books:

    REED & LISTER, (2020), Projective Ecologies, Harvard + Actar
    OLORIZ-SANJUAN, C. (2020), Landscape as Territory, Actar
    ZWEIG, JOHNSON and LOGAN, (2020), Houston Genetic City, Actar
    DESIMINI & WALDHEIM, (2020), Cartographic Grounds, Princeton Architectural press. 
    PAEZ, R. (2020), Operative Mapping: Maps as Design Tools, Actar
    WALLIS, J. and RAHMANN H. (2016), Landscape Architecture and Digital Technologies. Routlegde. 
    CANTRELL, B. and HOLZMAN, J. (2016), Responsive landscapes, Routlegde. 
    ANDERSON, J. and ORTEGA, D. (2016), Innovations in landscape architecture, Routlegde. 

    Essential readings:

    PICKETT et al. (2017) – ‘Dynamic heterogeneity: a framework to promote ecological integration and hypothesis generation in urban systems’, Urban Ecosystems, 20: 1-4.
    GIROT and MELSOM in AMOROSO (2015), Representing Landscapes: Digital. Chapter 20: Recasting Jakarta: processing the ‘Plastic River’.
    URECH et al. (2019) – ‘Point-Cloud Modeling: Exploring a Site-Specific Approach for Landscape Design’, Journal of Digital, 20: 1-4. (Link)
    URECH et al. (2020) – ‘Point cloud modeling as a bridge between landscape design and planning, Landscape and Urban Planning, Vol. 203 (Link)
    OZYAVUZ (2013) - Chapter-1_Inventory and Analysis of the landscape
    MAH in AMOROSO (2015) Representing Landscapes: Digital. Chapter 19: Digital media and material practice.
    MCCOWN and ZAWARUS in ANDERSON (2016), Innovations in Landscape Architecture. Chapter 4: Get Animated! Dynamic visualization and site analysis process. Routlegde. 
    AMOROSO and D’AGNONE in ANDERSON (2016), Innovations in Landscape Architecture. Chapter 6: Discovering landform processes through creative 3D mapping and diagramming of form, pattern, and arrangement.
    AMOROSO (2015), Representing Landscapes: Digital. Chapter: Sections and Elevations.
    CANTRELL in AMOROSO (2015) Representing Landscapes: Digital. Chapter 18: Terra Automata: Beyond representation of landscapes and ecologies.
    CANTRELL, B. and HOLZMAN, J. (2016), Responsive landscapes, Routlegde. Chapter 1 – Introduction: The paradigm shift, Nature? , Looking forward.
    CANTRELL, B. and HOLZMAN, J. (2016), Responsive landscapes, Routlegde. Chapter 2: Responsive technologies.
    WALLIS, Jillian and RAHMANN Heike, (2016), Landscape Architecture and Digital Technologies. Chapter 2: performative Urbanism.
    WALLIS, Jillian and RAHMANN Heike, (2016), Landscape Architecture and Digital Technologies. Chapter 4: Fabricating systems.

    Recommended course bibliography:

    MARGOLIS, L. and ROBINSON A. (2007), Living Systems: Innovative Materials and Technologies for Landscape Architecture
    BELESKY, P. (2018), Exploring the Computational Design of Natural Systems in Landscape Architecture, PhD thesis. https://researchbank.rmit.edu.au/eserv/rmit:162716/Belesky.pdf 
    BELESKY, P. (2013), Processors and Processes: Exploring Computational Design and Landscape Architecture, Master Thesis, https://researcharchive.vuw.ac.nz/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10063/2837/thesis.pdf?sequence=2 
    CHRISTENSE, Alan, (2005), Dictionary of Landscape Architecture and Construction, McGraw-Hill Professional
    DEE, Catherine (2001), Form and Fabric in Landscape Architecture. A visual introduction. Spon Press. London, New York.
    YGLESIAS, Caren (2014), The Innovative Use of Materials in Architecture and Landscape Architecture_ History, Theory and Performance. McFarland.
    ZIMMERMANN, Astrid (2009), Constructing landscape – Materials, Techniques, Structural Components. Bikhauser, Basel.

    Graphic & Representation bibliography:

    AMOROSO, N. (2015), Representing Landscapes: Digital, Routlegde.
    AMOROSO, N. (2016), Representing Landscapes: Hybrid, Routlegde.
    AMOROSO, N. (2015), Representing Landscapes: Digital, Routlegde.
    AMOROSO and HOOD (2012), Representing Landscapes: A visual collection of landscape architectural drawings, Routlegde.
    CANTRELL & YATES (2012), Modeling the Environment: Techniques and tools for the 3D Illustration of dynamic Landscapes, Wiley.
    CANTRELL & MICHAELS (2010), Digital Drawing for Landscape Architecture, Wiley.
    Online Learning
    Self-directed online training on GIS, remote sensing and Rhino + Grasshopper is highly recommended for this course. This will help advance your current skills and develop more innovative and complex design proposals. Students should present proof of completion of at least two of the following online courses (this may vary from one to another student depending on the type and scale of project):

    1. LinkedIn learning (https://www.linkedin.com/learning/). Free for Univ of Adelaide students.
    - Learning QGIS (3.0 Hrs)
    - Rhino Essential Training (2.5 Hrs)
    - Grasshopper Essential Training (6.0 Hrs)

    2. Archistar Academy (https://academy.archistar.ai/) Free for Univ of Adelaide students.
    - Rhino Essentials (3 Hrs) those who already know Rhino can skip this course.
    - Grasshopper Essentials (3 Hrs).

    3. Other online tutorials are provided in MyUni and students are free to complete them at their own pace. You can also visit and follow the YouTube channel (developed and curated by the course coordinator), for more tutorials:
    https://www.youtube.com/c/CarlosBartesaghiKocPhD

    4. Sketchfab models: https://sketchfab.com/Carlosbartesaghikoc/models
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is designed to advance landscape architecture design and digital skills. The course focuses of key issues of increasing relevance to contemporary landscape architectural practice; in particular, climate change and global warming, ecological disruption, systemic and dynamic thinking, self-sufficiency and circular economy.

    The teaching activities for this course are based on a combination of lectures that will introduce students to core content as well as weekly design studio and technical sessions. The studio sessions will involve assignments and presentations that will develop skills essential for design practice. The studio sessions will be conducted via Zoom and student progress will be assessed using the online collaborative board platform Miro.

    Technical skills in computational design will be achieved through technical support sessions via Zoom and through usual activity-based studio to engage students with the course content, which is linked to all aspects of the learning and teaching program that encourages both collaborative and individual initiatives. Several online tutorials and self-learning training will provide students with advanced skills in GIS, remote sensing, cartography, 3D modelling, simulation and visualisation techniques (More info: here).

    The assessable tasks are devised to simulate activities undertaken in design practice, such as analysis, alternative concept development, digital communication and effective online presentations. These are designed in an accumulative way such that the early assignments provide the foundation for subsequent assignments whilst providing opportunities for interim feedback.

    Furthermore, assessable tasks are integrated into the contact time periods to encourage efficient and productive brainstorming of ideas as often occurs in design studios. There will be many opportunities for students to discuss their work with other students and their studio tutors much as they would discuss ideas collaboratively in a design office.

    The art of criticism is emphasised as the mode for teaching and learning exchange between students, coordinator and guest reviewers, this course is, therefore, a necessary prerequisite in preparation for professional practice.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (ie. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote at least 48 hours per week to their studies. Accordingly, students undertaking this 6 unit course are expected to devote 24 hours per week to contact activities and self-guided studies.

    This time should be used towards preparation of weekly tasks and for completion of the various assignments associated with the course, including development of various skills required to complete the same. Please organise your time wisely.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    WEEK LECTURE STUDIO ACTIVITY
    Week 1 Foundation concepts
    Landscape processes and systems-thinking approach for ecological design
    Introduction to course assessment tasks, datasets, software, MIRO platform
    Week 2 Dynamic Cartographies
    Cartographic analysis, Advanced GIS mapping, sensing, monitoring & visualisation tools
    Introduction to site
    (Fieldtrip)
    Week 3 Environmentally-sensitive design
    Generative, and associative design to approach complex environments
    Critique
    Week 4 Brief: Landscape formations Review + Critique
    Week 5 Good Friday (Public Holiday) Complete self-training
    Week 6 Mid-Term reviews: Phase I Oral presentations
    Week 7 Parametric topographies
    Topology, generative terrains, rule-based surfaces, augmented reality sandbox
    Working on prototypes for the selected site
    Week 8 Fabrication and prototyping
    CNC and CAD/CAM prototyping, BIM integrated approaches and collaboration
    Prototype design
    Week 9 Performative design
    Performative analysis and scripting, performative landscape urbanism
    Refining and assembling prototypes
    Week 10 Simulated landscapes
    Energy, thermal comfort, real-time data and smart systems, simulated natures, synthetic ecologies
    Preparing the design synthesis
    Week 11 Responsive environments
    Responsive structures, and technologies, synthetic ecologies and computational landscapes
    Final design synthesis
    Week 12 Final review presentations: Phase II Final panel reviews (Oral presentations)
    Specific Course Requirements
    In addition to the defined tasks, students are expected to prepare for studio sessions. This includes experimentation and an ability with various forms of representation including computer drawing and modelling programs, hand-drawn techniques, model making and written word.

    Students are expected to read relevant texts during the course – some of these will be discussed in class.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Students will be fully briefed regarding assignments during class as indicated in the course timetable. Full written guidelines for each assessment task can be found in MyUni.
    Assessment Task Requirements Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    1. Phase I: Dynamic cartographies

    • Min 8xA2 booklet
    • Oral presentation
    • Optional: A max. 1 min video

    WK 6 Friday 09/04 23:59hrs

    30% 1,3, 4, 5
    2. Phase II: Landscape formations • Min. 2xA1 posters
    • Oral presentation
    • Optional: A max. 1 min video
    WK 12 Friday 04/06 23:59hrs 55% 2, 3, 4, 6
    3. Studio progress & training (15%)
    A. Self-training

    B. Studio progress and participation (through Miro online collaborative platform)
    • At least two online course certificates
    • Workspace with work-in-progress in MIRO
    WK 5.5 Friday 02/04 23:59hrs

    WK 12 Friday 04/06 23:59hrs
    5%

    10%
    3, 4


    Assessment Detail
    • Final results for the course will only be available through Access Adelaide and students SHOULD NOT contact the course coordinator or the tutors for the same.

    • Most assignments will be marked within 3 weeks of the submission and the interim grades will be made available through the My Grades system. Students are expected to inform the Course Coordinator if there are any errors with the marks entered on the system.

    • The best examples of students’ work will be included in the All-In Exhibition to be held at the end of term alongside the best works from other courses and year levels.
    Submission
    Assessment Task Due Weighting Submission Method
    Assessment Task Due Weighting Submission Method
    Assignment 01 Monday 16th March 20% Portfolio and presentation to class
    Assignment 02 Monday 6th April 20% Portfolio and presentation to class
    Assignment 03 Monday 1st June 60% Portfolio and presentation to class
    All assignments must be submitted at the time and place as indicated above. Note that NO LATE submissions will be accepted unless it is due to illness and other accepted circumstances as explained in the School's Student Handbook.
    Selected submissions of the Final Assignment will be included in the All-In Exhibition at the end of the semester.

    Submissions (General):
    • All submissions must include Student Name and Student ID Number. Submissions without Student Name or ID Number will not be considered for marking, and will receive zero marks in accordance with the guidelines.
    • In addition, all assignments need to have an Assignment Cover Sheet which must be signed and dated by the student before submission. Please attach the cover sheet in front of the document, to the top left hand corner.
    • Please adhere to submission deadlines and follow instructions provided.
    • Students must not submit work for an assignment that has previously been submitted for this course or any other course without prior approval from the Course Coordinator.
    • On occasion, the lecturer/tutor may wish to retain students’ work for future reference and the relevant student will be informed at such a time.
    Early Submission:
    • There is an early submission box located on Level 4 which is cleared out daily at 10am. Please mark your submission clearly before placing in box.
    • Models for in-class presentation cannot be handed in early.
    Late Submission:
    • The school will NOT accept late submissions and any such assignment will receive zero marks. This also applies to electronic submissions.
    • Printing delays & hard disk crashes will not be entertained as legitimate causes for delay, so please ensure that the work is finished in advance.
    Re-submission:
    • The school has a resubmission policy whereby students can redeem failed work by submitting additional work for a maximum of 50%.
    • The deadline for all re-submissions is 12pm on Friday 14th June 2013.
    Good practice:
    • Students should ensure that they regularly backup their work on multiple locations as hard-disk crashes are an unfortunate reality.
    • When relying on community printing facilities, students should attempt to finish their work in advance to avoid unnecessary delays.
    • Students must retain a copy of all assignments submitted (digital or hardcopy), as originals may be lost during the submission process.
    • For modified arrangements of submission and assessment due to special circumstances see the following Assessment Task Extension(s) & Additional Assessment guidelines.
    Modified Arrangements (General)
    • Students can apply for extensions or modified arrangements based on Medical conditions or other Extenuating circumstances. However, students need to submit their application along with supporting documents within 5 business days of the condition becoming applicable.
    • The application forms are available from the Front Office and at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html and need to be submitted at the Front Office along with any supporting documentation.
    • Please note that submitting an application does not guarantee acceptance and the Course Coordinator will inform the applicant if the application is accepted. Please DO NOT contact the Course Coordinator directly.
    Medical Reasons:
    • In case of an extended medical condition which makes it impossible for the student to submit the work on time, an Application for Assessment Task Extension due to Medical Circumstances may be lodged with the Front Office along with a doctor’s certificate within 5 business days.
    Extenuating Circumstances:
    • If the student is unable to submit the work on time due to extenuating circumstances an Application for Assessment Task Extension due to Extenuating Circumstances may be lodged with the Front Office.
    • Please note that this is only available for certain military, religious, or legal obligations and does not extend to minor personal problems.
    Compassionate Grounds:
    • In case of certain extraordinary personal problems students can apply for extensions based on compassionate grounds. However, these must first be discussed with the Course Coordinator in person through appointment during the assigned office hours.
    • To maintain privacy relating to personal issues students can contact the University Transition and Advisory Service at 8313 0100 or transition@adelaide.edu.au, or approach the Counselling Service on 83035663 for an individual appointment.
    Additional Assessment:
    • If a student receives a Fail grade for the course with an overall mark between 45 and 49, they may be eligible for an Additional Assessment which would allow them to get a maximum of 50 Pass for the Course.
    • Additional Assessment offers are made by the School and the student will be informed directly once these are made available.
    Disability:
    • Students who have a disability and wish to seek modified submission or assessment arrangements need to contact the University Disability Services at 83135962 or disability@adelaide.edu.au for supporting documentation and then communicate these to the Course Coordinator in person through appointment during the assigned office hours.
    Elite Athlete:
    • Students who have national/international sporting commitments and wish to seek modified submission or assessment arrangements need to register with the University Elite Athlete Support Scheme at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/eliteathletes/ and then communicate this to the Course Coordinator in person through appointment during the assigned office hours.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.