ARCH 7043 - Final Architecture Project (M)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

Students work on an individual design project of medium to high complexity, which showcases the student's mastery in particular areas of the discipline. The details of the project will be developed within guidelines and parameters defined by the coordinator. As the culmination of the Master's program the project should aim to demonstrate a practical yet critical engagement with aspects of Urbanism, Design Research, and/or History, Construction, Engineering Principles, Theory and Culture, developed in the previous part of the program. Accordingly, the design project needs to be accompanied by a theoretical exegesis which discusses the relevance of the proposed design to contemporary architectural developments and debates.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ARCH 7043
    Course Final Architecture Project (M)
    Coordinating Unit School of Architecture and Built Environment
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 12
    Contact Up to 12 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Restrictions Available to M.Arch (Cswk) students only
    Course Description Students work on an individual design project of medium to high complexity, which showcases the student's mastery in particular areas of the discipline. The details of the project will be developed within guidelines and parameters defined by the coordinator. As the culmination of the Master's program the project should aim to demonstrate a practical yet critical engagement with aspects of Urbanism, Design Research, and/or History, Construction, Engineering Principles, Theory and Culture, developed in the previous part of the program. Accordingly, the design project needs to be accompanied by a theoretical exegesis which discusses the relevance of the proposed design to contemporary architectural developments and debates.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Urs Bette

    Course staff

    Name: Urs Bette (coordinator)                        
    email: urs.bette@adelaide.edu.au                  
    contact: studio hours                                        

    name: Mirai Morita (tutor)
    email: mirai.morita@adelaide.edu.au   
    contact: studio hours

    name: Gabriel Ash (tutor)                                
    email: NA                                                       
    contact: studio hours                                       

    name: Martin Ridge (tutor)
    email: NA
    contact: studio hours

    name: Damien Chawalisz (tutor)                               
    email: NA                                                       
    contact: studio hours  
                                          
    name:   Dr. Margit Bruenner (tutor)
    email:  NA
    contact: studio hours


    Support Staff:

    For issues concerning enrolment or queries about the School’s programs contact Clement Low, Student Advisor, 8313 5877, clement.low@adelaide.edu.au.

    For issues related to discrimination or harassment contact the Course Coordinator
    or Velice Wennan, School Manager, 8313 5475, velice.wennan@adelaide.edu.au.

    For issues relating to health, safety and wellbeing contact Ian Florance, Health, Safety and Wellbeing Officer, 8313 5978, ian.florance@adelaide.edu.au.

    For issues relating to first aid contact Alison Bosnakis, First Aid Officer, 8313 5836, alison.bosnakis@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.


    Tuesdays
    pin-ups               10:00am – 01:00pm                  Gallery West / East
    pin-ups               02:00pm – 05:00pm                  Gallery West / East

    Fridays
    Desk crits           10:00am – 01:00pm                   Barr Smith South 540a/540b
    Desk crits           02:00pm – 05:00pm                   Barr Smith South 540a/540b
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The course aims to assist students to:


    1. expand their individual knowledge through proposal and critique

    2. practise the research of design precedents and their evaluation

    3. encourage diverse proposition in response to functional and theoretical criteria

    4. improve clear and informed articulation of design ideas

    5. improve use of digital design tools

    6. inspire self-directed investigation

    7. develop architectural design strategies as part of a broader vision

    8. confront contemporary ethical issues through the design process
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    NA
    Recommended Resources
    The University library has a collection of relevant design journals, which are an excellent resource for design ideas, theoretical texts, detailing and presentation techniques. E.g. El Croquis, Assemblage, Architectural Design, Harvard Design Magazine, Log, Project, Quaderns, Architecture Review and Architecture Australia.

    The School has a fortnightly lecture series where respected practitioners and academics from the field deliver a public lecture on contemporary architectural practice. In order to expand your knowledge of contemporary directions in design it is highly recommended that you attend these sessions. The exact detail of dates and speakers is available from the School website and the Front Office.

    Further:
    http://projectjournal.org
    http://www.clog-online.com
    http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com
    http://bldgblog.blogspot.com.au
    http://designreform.net
    http://www.anycorp.com
    http://www.stoutbooks.com
    http://relationalthought.wordpress.com
    http://www.rndrd.com
    http://architecture.com.au
    http://www.archdaily.com
    http://www.metropolismag.com/Architecture
    http://www.harvarddesignmagazine.org
    http://www.dezeen.com

    An overview of design research journals can be found here:
    http://www.archizines.com.
    Online Learning
    Here are a couple of relevant online design research journals / blogs, with which students should make themselves familiar:

    http://projectjournal.org
    http://www.clog-online.com
    http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com
    http://bldgblog.blogspot.com.au
    http://designreform.net
    http://www.anycorp.com
    http://www.stoutbooks.com
    http://relationalthought.wordpress.com
    http://www.rndrd.com
    http://architecture.com.au
    http://www.archdaily.com
    http://www.metropolismag.com/Architecture
    http://www.harvarddesignmagazine.org
    http://www.dezeen.com

    A wider overview of design research journals, with links to the respective sites, can be found here: http://www.archizines.com.

    Additional course material will consecutively be made available through MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The format for Final Architecture Project is the Design Studio, a structure that parallels industry processes for design development and resolution. Students are required to present their work each week in the Studio workshop environment, subjecting it to analysis, critique and response by staff and students. Students must maintain a written diary of these sessions, recording the responses to their weekly pin-up. This are "work in progress" presentations, nonetheless the work needs to be articulated and referenced in regards to the individual topics, theoretical backgrounds and practical issues pursued by the students. Students have the possibility to work 24/7 in the 5th year studio space. You are encouraged to claim a desk and make it your space. It is a proven fact that students who share a workplace generally produce better outcomes than lone fighters. The more material and thoughts are "in the open," the more ideas can be generated by re-assembling existing knowledge and producing genuine innovation. The support by tutors will be much more effective when current and past work is present and visible.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements. The University expects full-time students (ie. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote at least 48 hours per week to their studies. Accordingly, students undertaking this 12 unit course are expected to devote 48 hours per week to contact activities and self-guided study. Self-guided study should be used towards preparation of weekly pin-ups and the steady development of your project. The following figures are based on this framework, and might assist in managing your workload. The workload, established by the expected final outcome (presentation & exhibition) is significant. It adds up to a full time job!  Organise your time wisely.

    Total contact hours: 12 hrs per week x 12 weeks
    Total self-guided study: 36 hrs per week x 13 weeks
    Total workload hours: 48 hrs per week x 13 weeks
    Learning Activities Summary
    W1:     Launch
    W2:     Studio/Research
    W3:     Studio/Research
    W4:     Studio/Research
    W5:     Peer Review/Concept      
    W6:     Studio/Concept
    W7:     Mid Review/Concept
    W8:     Studio/Concept
    B1:     Break/Development
    B2:     Break/Development    
    W9:     Studio/Development
    W10:     Studio/Development
    W11:     Studio/Presentation
    W12:     Studio/Presentation    
    W13:    Final Review/Presentation

    W14:     Catalogue material        
    W16:     Exhibition posters             
    W17:     Exhibition Opening       

    The above dates may be revised on short notice. Students need to check their email regularly for any announcements.
    Specific Course Requirements
    Final Project is a self-lead design studio, in which students are asked to develop an architectural proposition in response to a given site. The project develops along the students own lines of interest and inquiry. They define their individual approach, the project’s program and purpose. The tutor's role is to coach and assist the students along their way. To help guide the genesis of the student’s projects, the semester is structured into 4 stages: Research, Concept, Development and Presentation.

    Research refers to an individual field of interest, topic or problem each student aims to interrogate and test through his/her design proposal. The frame of reference for these investigations can be set within a broad range of different yet overlapping fields; architectural theory, formal exploration, society, finance, science fiction, sustainability, planning policy, technology, etc.

    Concept refers to the proposal of a specific design strategy, which emerges as a synthesis of the interrogated problem / field of interest, the specific program and the given site. It should critically reflect upon the current state of theoretical and professional debate, and amalgamate the research into a coherent proposal that exists within a defined hypothetical framework.

    Development refers to the more detailed design work, testing the established concept in regards to planning, organisation, circulation, structure, material, functional and technological fit, as well as urban design criteria. These aspects need to be critically studied and reflected upon, particularly if a proposal aims to transferring solutions or theoretical propositions between different bodies of knowledge, and thus challenge the existing modes of best practice.

    Presentation refers to the preparation of high quality drawings, models, renderings, a graphic proposal with reflective commentary (booklet / exegesis) and the final exhibition boards, that clearly and evocatively present the investigated problem, evolving solutions, final idea and implementation of the design.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students form peer review groups of 6 students each. Amongst them they select 3 student, who are asked to present their current lines of inquiry in form of a research proposal to their colleagues. With it they frame the topics around which their design project shall develop, and the working methods they intend to employ. The other students are asked to discuss and assess the proposals, along the lines of pre-set criteria. The aim is to anticipate and experience an observer’s viewpoint, and to facilitate the iterative perspectival shift in the work of a designer, between making and assessing in order to arrive at an idea that can be shared with others.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    1.
    General semester progress and pin-ups    
    Due Date: NA    
    Time: NA    
    Weight: 20%    
    Type: Summative    
    Learning Objectives: 1,2,3,5,6,8

    2.
    Mid Review: Graphic Proposal with reflective commentary   
    Due Date: Week 7, Monday, 9pm
    Weight: 30%  
    Type: Summative    
    Learning Objectives: 1,4,6,7,8

    3.
    Final Review: Exhibition Boards + model    
    Due Date: Week 13, Monday, 9pm 
    Weight: 50%    
    Type: Summative    
    Learning Objectives: 1,2,3,4,57,8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Participation in the weekly pin-ups and desk-crits is required, in order to demonstrate the projects’ progress and to take benefit from the tutors’ feedback. Students are asked to maintain a diary of comments and suggestions. Attendance at the mid- and end-review is compulsory. Students, whose work has been selected for the exhibition, need to hand in the catalogue material, revised exhibition boards and a model according to schedule. Work handed in for Mid and Final Review, but not presented in person, is considered as “no submission”.
    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission
    1. General semester progress and pin-ups    
    Due Date: weekly, studio hrs   
    Weight: 20%    
    Method: pin-up

    2. Mid Review Presentation: Graphic Proposal with reflective commentary
    Due Date: Week 7, Monday, 9pm
    Weight: 30%  
    Method: submit pdf via dropbox, screen presentation + print

    3. Final Review:  Exhibition boards + model
    Due Date: Week 13, Monday, 9pm 
    Weight: 50%    
    Method: submit pdf via dropbox, print presentation
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.