HLTH SC 2101 - Fundamentals of Biomechanics and Human Movement

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2015

Biomechanics is the study of the effect of mechanical phenomena on the human body. This course will introduce students to the mechanical principles that can be applied to human structure and function allowing analysis of human movement and the musculoskeletal system. Basic mechanics (statics, kinematics and dynamics) will be studied in two dimensions. The biomechanics of human gait walking and running will be investigated. The students understanding of these concepts will be examined through the study of normal gait dynamics, muscle function, work and power. An awareness of the mechanics of tissues in the musculoskeletal system will be introduced as applied to exercise prescription and injury. The theoretical basis of methods for assessing movement, both quantitative and qualitative, will also be introduced enabling basic practical analysis of common movements to be performed.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 2101
    Course Fundamentals of Biomechanics and Human Movement
    Coordinating Unit School of Medical Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 5 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites ANAT SC 1102
    Corequisites ANAT SC 2200
    Assumed Knowledge Level 1 Mathematics
    Course Description Biomechanics is the study of the effect of mechanical phenomena on the human body. This course will introduce students to the mechanical principles that can be applied to human structure and function allowing analysis of human movement and the musculoskeletal system. Basic mechanics (statics, kinematics and dynamics) will be studied in two dimensions. The biomechanics of human gait walking and running will be investigated. The students understanding of these concepts will be examined through the study of normal gait dynamics, muscle function, work and power. An awareness of the mechanics of tissues in the musculoskeletal system will be introduced as applied to exercise prescription and injury. The theoretical basis of methods for assessing movement, both quantitative and qualitative, will also be introduced enabling basic practical analysis of common movements to be performed.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor John Semmler

    Additional academic staff: Paul Grimshaw - paul.grimshaw@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    1 x 2 hour lecture/week, 1 x 2 hour tutorial/laboratory per week



  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Understand and apply concepts and terminology within the area of biomechanics
    2 Describe how biomechanical factors influence motion in sport and exercise
    3 Demonstrate an understanding of statics, kinematics and kinetics in human movement
    4 Evaluate movement and estimate force on human structures during exercise and sports
    5 Demonstrate an understanding of how changes of movement patterns and techniques will influence the load on human tissues during movement
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 3-5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1-2, 5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 4-5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4-5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1-5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Grimshaw, P, Lees, A., Fowler, N. And Burden, A. Instant notes in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics. 2007. ISBN 185996284X

    Recommended Resources

    Sports biomechanics : the basics : optimising human performance . Blazevich, Anthony. A & CB, 2007.

    Principles of Biomechanics. Ronald L . Huston. CRC Press 2008

    Biomechanics: Principles and Applications. Edited by Daniel J . Schneck and Joseph D . Bronzino. CRC Press 2002

    Biomechanics in Ergonomics. Taylor and Francis. 1999. Kumar, S. (ed)

    Fundamentals of Biomechanics (Second Edition). Knudson, D. 2007. Springer

    Biomechanics in Sport. Zatsiorsky, V (ed). 2000. Wiley

    Introduction to Sports Biomechanics. Taylor and Francis. 2007. Bartlett, R (ed)

    Online Learning
    Electronic lectures will be housed on the course page located in MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    The course will be delivered via the use of both electronic (recorded and in-person) and face-to-face sessions (tutorials and laboratory classes). The content of the electronic/online material will be rehearsed and supported by face to face/guided tutorials incorporating practical case scenarios using specific measurement techniques (required skills) to explore concepts.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will be required to attend 1 x 2-hour large group sessions (lectorials) and 1 x 2-hour tutorial/laboratory class per week.



    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Module Theme Online task topic Practical/tutorial
    1 Kinematics Descriptors of Motion (A1)
    Linear Motion (A2)
    Anatomical Planes and Axes
    Linear Motion
    2 Angular Motion (A3)
    Linear and Angular Motion (A4)
    Angular Motion
    3 Measurement Techniques Uniform Acceleration (A7)
    Opto-Electronic Techniques (F1)
    2D LABORATORY
    4 Kinetics Forces (B1)
    Newton's Laws - Linear Motion (B2)
    Projectile Motion, Vectors
    Newton's Laws
    5 Newton's Laws Impulse and Momentum (B3)
    Torque and Moment of Force (C1)
    Impulse-Momentum
    Moments
    6 Measurement Techniques Newton's Laws - angular motion (C2)
    The Force Platform (F5)
    FORCE PLATE LABORATORY
    7

    Centre of Gravity

    Moment of Inertia

    Moment of Inertia (C3)
    Centre of Gravity (C4)
    Angular Momentum, Moment of Inertia
    8 Levers (C6)
    Work, Power and Energy (D1)
    Levers, Moments.
    9 Measurement Techniques Conservation of Energy (D2)
    Electromyography (F7)
    ELECTROMYOGRAPHY LABORATORY
    10 Sporting Applications Mechanical characteristics of materials (D3)
    Biomechanical characteristics of running (E2)
    Energy, Work, Power.
    11 Injury Biomechanical characteristics of jumping (E3)
    Propulsion through a fluid (E5)
    Presentations
    12 Measurement Techniques Injury (E6)
    Anthropometry, Biomechanics and Sports Equipment Design (F9)
    Centre of Mass, Centre of Gravity
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Assessment type Weighting Learning course outcome(s) being addressed
    1. Written Test Summative 10% 1-5
    2. Laboratory Report Summative 20% 4
    3. Presentation Summative 15% 1
    4. Tutorial Book Summative 5% 1-5
    4. Final examination Summative 50% 1-5
    Assessment Related Requirements

    Students must successfully complete and pass all assessments to be eligible to pass this course.

    Assessment Detail

    Assessment task 1 – Written Test (10%)
    This will be a written test of 1hr duration that is conducted in the tutorial time in week 5. The test will contain a range of written (short answers) responses. The test will be based upon the concepts and theory learned in the course thus far. The test mark will contribute 10% to the final mark for this course.

    Assessment task 2 – Laboratory Report (20%)
    This report (2000 words total) will consist of a laboratory class practical written up as a report (2000 word limit maximum). The
    laboratory report will be marked as one report and will contribute 20% to the final mark of the course. The assessed laboratory practical classes will take place in Weeks 6 and 7. The report will need to be submitted by Friday of Week 8.

    Assessment task 3 – Presentation (15%)
    In groups of between two and four people, you are required to present a 12-minute PowerPoint presentation to the rest of the class. The talk must be strictly no longer than 12 minutes, however it may be delivered in a shorter time frame. Groups will receive a 2 minute warning and will be stopped when 12-minutes is reached. The topic of your presentation must be taken from ONE of the papers that were presented at the International Society of Biomechanics in Sport Congress and these pdfs can be accessed from the website link provided. This will take place in Week 11.

    Assessment task 4 – Tutorial Workbook (5%)
    A complete tutorial workbook showing all attempts at the 9 tutorials that were presented throughout the course is required. While it is not expected that you will have a perfect solution to all these problems it is expected that you will have attempted all of them. This will be required by Friday of Week 12.

    Assessment task 5 – Final Written Exam (50%)
    This will be an open book written examination that is conducted in the University examination week (weeks 15/16). The examination will contain a range of written questions (5 questions) and you will be required to answer ALL questions. The examination will be based upon the concepts and theory learned in the course (this includes lectures, laboratory classes and additional reading and work sheets). The examination mark will contribute 50% to the final mark for this course.




    Submission


    Submission and Return of Assignments
    Students are responsible for keeping copies of all assignments and must be able to provide these within 24 hours if required.  Receipts will not be provided when assignments are submitted.

    Assignment submission
    Please submit assignments via the assignment submission boxes. These will be advised.

     

    Assignment return
    Assignments will be returned at the end of specified teaching sessions.  Assignments will be returned within approximately two weeks of the due date.






    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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