NURSING 2005 - Biology of Human Disease I

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

Biology of Human Disease I identifies some of the most significant pathologies challenging the health of the Australian population. The use of clinical cases encourages students to relate scientific principles to medical and nursing interventions. The course provides a systematic approach to the description of pathological changes of integumentary, endocrine, gastrointestinal, respiratory and reproductive systems. The base of knowledge provided by this course will encourage students to adopt an attitude to incorporating scientific concepts throughout their nursing career.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code NURSING 2005
    Course Biology of Human Disease I
    Coordinating Unit School of Nursing
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Restrictions Available to B.Nurs students only
    Course Description Biology of Human Disease I identifies some of the most significant pathologies challenging the health of the Australian population. The use of clinical cases encourages students to relate scientific principles to medical and nursing interventions. The course provides a systematic approach to the description of pathological changes of integumentary, endocrine, gastrointestinal, respiratory and reproductive systems. The base of knowledge provided by this course will encourage students to adopt an attitude to incorporating scientific concepts throughout their nursing career.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Frances Corrigan

    Course Coordinator: Dr Renee Turner
    Phone: +61 8 8313 3114
    Email: renee.turner@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: The University of Adelaide Centre for Neuroscience Research, North Terrace

    Tutor: Dr Frances Corrigan
    Phone: +61 8 8313 4150
    Location: Room S524, Medical School South

    Tutor: Associate Professor Corinna van den Heuvel
    Phone: +61 8 8313 1456
    Location: Room N305a, Medical School North

    Tutor: Associate Professor Rachel Gibsom
    Phone: +61 8 8313 1023
    Location: Room N332a, Medical School North

    School Office
    Email: nursing_preregistration@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Apply the principles of normal anatomy and physiology of human body systems to the pathophysiological processes of common health problems.
    2 Analyse some of the ways in which human adaptive and compensatory physiological mechanisms are affected by specific pathological conditions.
    3 Identify the impact of pathophysiological processes across the lifespan.
    4 Explain the physiological processes, interactions, and controls to maintain homeostasis in the specific areas of neoplasia and immunological disorders.
    5 Explain the physiological processes, interactions, and controls to maintain homeostasis in the specific areas of cardiovascular disease.
    6 Explain the physiological processes, interactions, and controls to maintain homeostasis in the specific areas of endocrine and blood disorders.
    7 Explain the physiological processes, interactions, and controls to maintain homeostasis in the specific areas of skin disorders.
    8 Explain the physiological processes, interactions, and controls to maintain homeostasis in the specific areas of renal disorders
    9 Discuss the clinical manifestations and nursing management of selected disease processes and health problems.
    10 Discuss the nurse’s role and responsibility for assessment of individual’s experiencing health problems that result in pathophysiological alterations.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-10
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2-3
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 10
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 3, 8, 10
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 10
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 10
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 4-8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Bullock, S Hales, M 2013 Principles of Pathophysiology, Pearson, Frenchs Forest, NSW
    Recommended Resources
    Porth’s Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States”. 8th/9th Ed, LWW.
    Online Learning
    Online resources will be provided throughout the course in lectures and tutorials.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Face to face lectures – Face to face lectures offer synchronous learning opportunities and enable students to quickly clarify complex descriptions and terminology. Much of the content for this course is supported by textbooks with web page and e-learning supports (e.g. flash cards for revision). The School of Nursing supports the audio and video capture of lecture content as an aid to revision.

    Tutorials also assist students to integrate the course material towards clinical experience.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The workload for this course requires attendance at:
    • 2 x 1 hour lecture / week
    • 1 x 2 hour tutorial / week

    Non-contact hours for assessment and tutorial preparation will be 8 hours per week.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Lecture Series:
    1. Introduction to the immune system
    2. Cellular adaptation and cell death
    3. Acute inflammation
    4. Chronic Inflammation
    5. Introduction to clotting disorders
    6. Disorders of white blood cells
    7. Neoplasia
    8. Skin: pressure ulcers, burns and skin cancer
    9. Introduction to cardiovascular system: revision of heart and blood vessel structure and function
    10. Cardiovascular 1: thrombosis, embolism, atheroscerlosis and aneurysms
    11. Cardiovascular 2:Hypertension: primary, secondary, malignant
    12. Cardiovascular 3: Ischaemic heart disease
    13. Cardiovascular 4: Shock
    14. Cardiovascular 5:Heart Failure
    15. Cardiovascular 6: Valvular Heart Disease
    16. Anaemia
    17. Endocrine: Introduction to hypo/hyperthyroidism
    18. Diabetes 1: Pathogenesis
    19. Diabetes 2: Complications
    20. Renal 1: Acute and chronic renal failure
    21. Renal 2: Glomerulonephritis, UTI
    22. Renal 3: Acid/base disorders

    Tutorial series:
    1. Introduction to Pathophysiology course and nursing assessment
    2. Introduction to the immune system; Cellular adaptation and cell death
    3. Acute and chronic inflammation
    4. Clotting and white blood cell disorders
    5. Neoplasia and common skin conditions
    6. Atherosclerosis
    7. Hypertnesion and ischaemic heart disease
    8. Shock; Mid-semester test feedback
    9. Heart failure and valvular heart disease
    10. Anaeamia and introduction to endocrine
    11. Diabetes
    12. Renal 1-2
    13: Renal: acid/base; Exam revision
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The SGDE for students within the Bachelor of Nursing is applicable to 1st year students in 2014. A SGDE for 2nd year students will be implemented in 2015.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment 1: Mini-Tests x3
    Assessment 2: Mid-Semester Test
    Assessment 3: Group Clinical Scenario Assignment
    Assessment 4: End of Semester Exam

    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Mini Test #1 Formative 0% Lectures weeks 1-2
    Mini Test #2 Summative 7.5% Lectures weeks 3-4
    Mini Test #3 Summative 7.5% Lectures weeks 5-8
    Mid-semester test Summative 20% Lectures weeks 1-6
    Group clinical scenario assignment Summative 15% Group work, oral presentation on case study
    Final exam Summative 50% Entire course content
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment 1: Mini-Tests x3
    Assessment type: 1x formative, 2x summative
    Weighting: mini-test#1 = 0%; min-test#2 = 7.5%; mini-test#3 = 7.5% (15% total)
    Description: Three short assessments using 10 MCQs to test work done in previous weeks.

    Assessment 2: Mid-Semester Test
    Assessment type: summative
    Weighting: 20%
    Description: This test will examine lecture material front he first half of this semester. It will contain short answer questions and MCQs.

    Assessment 3: Group Clinical Scenario Assignment
    Assessment type: summative
    Weighting: 15%
    Description: This assignment will examine the ability of a group of 6 to work together and produce a group oral presentation outlining the Pathophysiology of a common clinical condition. All group members will receive the same mark.

    Assessment 4: End of Semester Exam
    Assessment type: summative
    Weighting: 50%
    Description: This written examination is aimed at ascertaining each student's grasp of the principles and core course content presented during this module and will be held in the university's official examination period. It will contain short answer questions and MCQs. This time allocated will be 130mins (including reading time), but many students should be able to complete it in less than this; the additional time is provided to enable planning and review of answers. Note that a range of questions will be used, which will require students to provide information, apply information in defined settings and/or integrate knowledge derived from a variety of sources in the formulation of an answer.
    Submission
    Unless otherwise indicated, all assignments are to be submitted through MyUni.
    Students MUST keep an electronic copy of all assignments submitted.
    Cover sheets are required for all assignments and can be accessed from the School of Nursing website.
    Extension of time must be negotiated with the Course coordinator. This action will be taken to prevent students who do get their work in on time being disadvantaged.
    Whenever possible staff will turn around marked assignments within 4 weeks or earlier.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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