GSSA 1004 - Introduction to Gender Studies

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

Gender is encountered in every aspect of our lives. It informs public debate, legislation, how much money we earn, who dies younger and our exposure to risk and sexual violence. The course examines contemporary gender relations in Australian society, in our everyday lives, the school, the workplace, and the home. To what extent can we explain these relations in terms of women's and men's choices and to what extent in terms of masculinities and femininities, laws and institutions, and the distribution of power and resources in Australian society? The ways that ethnicity, 'race' and class modify and give meaning to gender debates in an Australian and international context will also be a central concern.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GSSA 1004
    Course Introduction to Gender Studies
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Incompatible GWSI 1004, GWSI 1004EX
    Course Description Gender is encountered in every aspect of our lives. It informs public debate, legislation, how much money we earn, who dies younger and our exposure to risk and sexual violence. The course examines contemporary gender relations in Australian society, in our everyday lives, the school, the workplace, and the home. To what extent can we explain these relations in terms of women's and men's choices and to what extent in terms of masculinities and femininities, laws and institutions, and the distribution of power and resources in Australian society? The ways that ethnicity, 'race' and class modify and give meaning to gender debates in an Australian and international context will also be a central concern.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Megan Warin

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Investigate issues and debates around gender, particularly in relation to Australian society.
    2 Identify and explain the ways in which gender shapes our everyday lives through the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, age, religion, culture, and nation.
    3 Discuss the ways in which systems of power, privilege, and oppression shape our experiences as individuals and members of communities.
    4 Develop a critical vocabulary that includes key theoretical debates in historical and contemporary gender studies.
    5 Demonstrate research literacy, through library searches, research techniques and skills, development of argument, and academic referencing.
    6 Write logical and coherent arguments based on evidence, and engage in critical debate.
    7 Work with others in the exploration of ideas and to collectively develop arguments and negotiate solutions to problems.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1, 2, 4, 5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 2, 3. 4. 6, 7
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4, 5, 6, 7
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1, 2, 3, 5, 7
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 2, 3,7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Readings can be accessed through MyUni.
    Recommended Resources

    Beasley, C. (2005) Gender and Sexuality: Critical Theories, Critical Thinkers. London: Sage.

    Buchbinder, D (2013) Studying Men and Masculinities, Abingdon: Routledge.

    Connell, R. W. (2002) Gender. Cambridge, Polity Press.

    Fine, C (2010) Delusions of Gender: The Real Science behind Sex Differences. Icon Books: London.

    Gill, R and C Scharff (2011) New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity. Palgrave, MacMillan, London.

    Holmes, M. (2009) Gender and Everyday Life. London: Routledge.

    Kimmel, M. (2010) Misframing Men: The Politics of Contemporary Masculinities. NJ: Rutgers University Press.

    Maguire, E. (2008) Princesses and Pornstars: Sex, Power, Identity. Camberwell: Penguin Books.

    Walter, N. (2010) Living Dolls: The Return of Sexism. London: Virago.

    Edwards, T. (2006) Cultures of Masculinity. New York: Routledge
    Online Learning

    Lecture podcasts, handouts, essay questions, links and updates about contemporary issues and further reading will be posted to the MyUni course site available via the MyUni link on University Web page at www.adelaide.edu.au.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Throughout the semester students will be required to attend a 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial each week. Some weeks the 2 hour lecture will be divided into a lecture and workshop, with the second hour involving problem solving activities.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.


    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

     
    1 x 2 hour lecture per week (x 11) 22
    1 x 1 hour tutorial per week (x 11) 11
    1 x 3 hours reading each week (x 11) 33
    1 x 3 hours assignment preparation each week (x 12) 36
    Total 102


    Learning Activities Summary
    0 Introduction to the course and its requirements
    1 Defining key terms: Sex, gender and sexuality
    2 Gender and social change in Australia: An historical perspective
    Film: Utopia Girls
    3 Mapping out Gender Theories
    4 Indigenous women and feminism: The Bell/Huggins debate
    5 Research activities for major essay
    6 Theorising masculinities: Hegemonic and subordinated.
    7 Queering gender and critiquing heterosexuality
    Film: The Celluloid Closet
    8 Boys toys: The making of masculinity through cars
    9 Body politics: Identity and power
    10 Pornography and objectification
    11 Gender and generations
    12 Assistance with major essays
    Specific Course Requirements

    Not applicable.
    Small Group Discovery Experience

    Group activities will take place in lecture and tutorial times. Each week students will present a focused topic with peers in the tutorials. The major research assignment can be undertaken in pairs.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Task type Weight
    Minor paper 800 words Essay 25%
    Tutorial presentation 25%
    Tutorial participation 10%
    Major paper – Gender project 2500 words Research essay 40%
    Assessment Related Requirements

    Students are required to complete all assessment tasks to be eligible to pass this course.
    Assessment Detail

    Participation
    Each week you must come to tutorial class well-prepared, and then demonstrate your preparation by contributing to discussion in a constructive manner.

    Tutorial Presentation
    With one or two other students you will select one of the tutorial topics to make an oral presentation to your tutorial class and then guide the ensuing discussion on the topic. You will have key questions in your study guide to help you with this task (which include set readings that all members of the tutorial class will do in preparation).  

    Minor paper
    A set essay question will be handed out in class.

    Major Paper
    The major research paper is based on 2 face to face interviews with adults around the theme of gender and gender relations as a social construction. You may include relevant areas that you can analyse in terms of how the person’s gender affects their experiences, such as religion, family, sexuality, class, politics, health or work.

    You may choose to do this project on your own or as a group of two.
    Submission
    Your Minor and Major essays in this course will be submitted online via the relevant MyUni course site.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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