GSSA 2100 - Consumption, Work and the Self

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

The contemporary focus on the individual as distinct from society is one of the hallmarks of post-industrial western societies. The ways in which young people are increasingly invited to imagine and construct their identity through consumption as opposed to other aspects of the self, such as work, community relations or ethical beliefs is a particular concern of the course. This is an applied course which examines new and emerging theories, practices and experiences of consumption, work and identity and how they relate to current debates around citizenship in the broader context. Students will focus on examples drawn from advertising and the rhetoric of capitalism, personal self-presentation and development, lifestyle marketing, financial aspirations, regulation of work, the music industry and urban living. Students will be required to undertake a textual or discourse analysis as part of the applied component of the course. They will also be required to undertake a critical reflection of their own experiences of work and consumption.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GSSA 2100
    Course Consumption, Work and the Self
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 undergraduate study
    Incompatible GWSI 2002, GWSI 3002, GWSI 2100, GWSI 2100EX
    Course Description The contemporary focus on the individual as distinct from society is one of the hallmarks of post-industrial western societies. The ways in which young people are increasingly invited to imagine and construct their identity through consumption as opposed to other aspects of the self, such as work, community relations or ethical beliefs is a particular concern of the course. This is an applied course which examines new and emerging theories, practices and experiences of consumption, work and identity and how they relate to current debates around citizenship in the broader context. Students will focus on examples drawn from advertising and the rhetoric of capitalism, personal self-presentation and development, lifestyle marketing, financial aspirations, regulation of work, the music industry and urban living. Students will be required to undertake a textual or discourse analysis as part of the applied component of the course. They will also be required to undertake a critical reflection of their own experiences of work and consumption.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Dee Michell

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On the successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. Recognise key interdisciplinary theorists, concepts, debates and social research methods used to explore ideas and practices around consumption, work and identity
    2. Locate, analyse and critique academic literature in relation to consumption and work
    3. Evaluate media representations of consumption and work in relation to academic literature
    4. Work collaboratively in small groups to examine and appraise contemporary consumption and work practices
    5. Plan and conduct a research project
    6. Write logical, sustained and coherent arguments based on evidence and considering a range of socio-cultural perspectives
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    A Course Reader will be available to purchase from the Image & Copy Centre, Level 1, Hughes Blg. The Course Reader will also be made available electronically via MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    A variety of resources to assist in Asssignment preparation will be made available via MyUni throughout the semester.
    Online Learning
    All course related material will be available via MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Throughout the semester students will be required to attend a 2 hour lecture and a 1 hour tutorial each week. These will not be conventional lectures however, as students will be invited to participate in small group discussions and structured activities designed to consolidate concepts and employ critical thinking skills.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2 hour lecture each week (x 12)    24 hours
    1 x 1 hour tutorial each week (x 11)   11 hours
    1 x 2 hour Weekly reading & tutorial preparation (x 10)    40 hours
    Assignment Preparation   40 hours
    Total:  115 hours
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week  Learning Activity
    1 Introduction & Orientation
    2 Identity, Subjectivity, Performativity
    3 Learning to Consume
    4 Cultural Omnivores
    5 Beauty Culture
    6 Dressing for Work
    7 Examining Workplaces
    8 Invisible work
    9 Femininity, Masculinity & the Mining Boom
    10 Sustainability
    11 Disorderly Conduct
    12 To be advised
    Specific Course Requirements
    Not applicable
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Two hours lecture time each week has been allocated for this course. These will not be conventional lectures however, as students will be invited to participate in small group discussions and structured activities designed to consolidate concepts and employ critical thinking skills. In addition, weekly tutorial discussions will be interactive and collaborative opportunities to further explore key ideas and relevant contemporary reearch.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Due Date Weight Learning Objectives
    Assignment 1: 1000 word research exercise  Week 6 30%
    Assignment 2: 2000 word critical reflection Week 12 50%
    Assignment 3: class participation & exercises Ongoing 20%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students are required to complete all assessment tasks to be eligible to pass this course.
    Assessment Detail
    Assignment 1: Research Exercise

     
    This assignment will require students to locate and gather evidence from a variety of sources, for example, current television series, print and online media articles, academic literature, reputable sources of statistical information & lecture material.  Further instructions will be available on MyUni.

    Assignment 2: Critical Reflection

    This assignment will require students to critically evaluate contemporary consumer society from their perspective as individuals, consumers, and workers. Evidence will need to be sourced from lectures, academic literature (including that provided in the Reader), and other reputable sources.  Further instructions will be available on MyUni.

    Assignment 3: Class Participation

    Assessment for this assignment will include attendance and engagement with weekly reading and structured activities.
    Submission
    Assignments are to be submitted online via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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