GSSA 2103 - Politics, Policy & Citizenship

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

The course examines social policy and citizenship in Australia from the perspective of the social sciences. It has a focus on the historical and contemporary constructions of Australian citizenship and how these constructions both impact upon and is shaped by social policy. A key focus will be the representation of contemporary public issues within a social policy framework drawing attention to the ways different knowledges of the social sciences understand public issues and how these issues are in turn constructed in policy. The course also examines emerging debates on the social, political and economic definitions and re-definitions of citizenship. Current debates in the broad areas of power relations, political and social rights and the future of welfare policy in an era of globalisation and economic uncertainty are examined. A selection of case studies drawing on current research will be used to provide a framework for understanding social policy and citizenship dimensions in Australian society. This course has an applied focus through which students study the policy process and develop policy analysis skills.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GSSA 2103
    Course Politics, Policy & Citizenship
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 undergraduate study
    Incompatible GWSI 2016, GWSI 3016, GWSI 2103
    Course Description The course examines social policy and citizenship in Australia from the perspective of the social sciences. It has a focus on the historical and contemporary constructions of Australian citizenship and how these constructions both impact upon and is shaped by social policy. A key focus will be the representation of contemporary public issues within a social policy framework drawing attention to the ways different knowledges of the social sciences understand public issues and how these issues are in turn constructed in policy. The course also examines emerging debates on the social, political and economic definitions and re-definitions of citizenship. Current debates in the broad areas of power relations, political and social rights and the future of welfare policy in an era of globalisation and economic uncertainty are examined. A selection of case studies drawing on current research will be used to provide a framework for understanding social policy and citizenship dimensions in Australian society. This course has an applied focus through which students study the policy process and develop policy analysis skills.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Nadine Levy

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Understand social policy, critical reading and analytical writing
    2 Locate, access and evaluate a range of resources available to support critical policy research and writing
    3 Apply social policy to critical discussions relating to society on a local and global scale
    4 Confidently engage with social policy in the real world
    5 Demonstrate a critical approach to ethical issues in the context of public policy about contemporary issues and debates
    6 Demonstrate productive and respectful engagement with their peers through structured group work
    7 Prepare and deliver coherent and logically argued written texts
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The course reader: Politics, Policy & Citizenship can be purchased at Image and Copy Centre
    Online Learning
    Additional materials will be made available on Myuni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course integrates lectures, workshops and students’ independent and collaborative study to facilitate engaged learning in critical dialogue, problem-posing and the sociological imagination. Lectures will introduce new content in historical and contemporary contexts, highlighting the issues, policy responses and impacts on citizenship. Students will be required to read and comment on the texts in their writing and group work. Students will experience in practice the way policy is considered, critiqued and reformulated in a ‘work setting’. Students will be provided with opportunities to learn new skills in collaborative projects.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2-hour seminar (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    5 hours reading per week 60 hours per semester
    3 hours assignment preparation per week 36 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Introduction to the course & historical background to the field

    Understanding social policy & citizenship

    Institutional context of policy making

    Understanding how social policy is made part 1: Values, language, concepts

    Understanding how social policy is made part 2: Think tanks and ‘special interest’ groups

    Historical context of Australian social policy

    Policy in practice: Actors and Agents

    International context for Australian social policy

    Challenges for the 21st century – where is Australian social policy heading?

    Structure of the report


    Specific Course Requirements
    Students are required to complete all assessment tasks to be eligible to pass the course.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    1000 word essay Formative and Summative 20% 1, 4, 7
    Group wok activities (inc papers & presentations) Formative and Summative 45% 1-7
    2700 word research project Formative and Summative 35% 2, 3, 5, 6, 7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students are required to complete all assessment tasks to be eligible to pass this course.
    Assessment Detail
    The following principles of conduct for staff and students have been adopted by the Discipline of Gender Studies and Social Analysis.

    Active and appropriate participation; based on preparation for the lectures and group work is required.

    Valuing diversity of experiences and contribution of other students – listening attentively to the contributions of others, considering how you frame your own responses, especially if they are critical (comment on aspects of the argument and do not criticise the characteristics of the person), and employ self-critique (use the contributions of others to ask questions about your own perspectives and assumptions).
    Submission
    Your assignments in this course must be submitted online via the relevant MyUni course site.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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