LING 5112 - Field Linguistics

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

This course will be useful to all PG students of Linguistics who are preparing for their role as researchers and practitioners. The course focuses on language as it is spoken and our ability as researchers to render that language in a form that is suitable for analysis. Students will learn how to collect/record data, how to manage and store it and how to go about analysing it for a range of purposes, including language description and contrastive analysis to identify areas of difficulty for language learners. The course will necessarily deal with the context in which data collection takes place and will address research ethics and protocols, the Observer's Paradox, and practicalities of recording, transcribing (both broad and narrow IPA transcription), organising (tagging) and archiving data. The course will look at the nature of the language data that is being recorded: oral vs written; natural speech versus elicited speech; ethnography of communication; varieties of language, borrowing, code-switching, style-shifting and diglossia. A range of analytical approaches will also be addressed. The particular focus of analysis will depend on the student cohort and their specific needs, but will include several of the following: Phonemic Analysis; Orthography Design; Contrastive Analysis (identifying difficulties for language learners); Morphological Analysis; Semantic Analysis; Lexicography; Syntactic Analysis; Analysis of Code-Switching. As a result this course will be able to address basic understandings and analytic techniques through practical investigation.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code LING 5112
    Course Field Linguistics
    Coordinating Unit Linguistics
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites Completed degree (72 units) including minimum 24 units in Applied Linguistics
    Course Description This course will be useful to all PG students of Linguistics who are preparing for their role as researchers and practitioners. The course focuses on language as it is spoken and our ability as researchers to render that language in a form that is suitable for analysis. Students will learn how to collect/record data, how to manage and store it and how to go about analysing it for a range of purposes, including language description and contrastive analysis to identify areas of difficulty for language learners.

    The course will necessarily deal with the context in which data collection takes place and will address research ethics and protocols, the Observer's Paradox, and practicalities of recording, transcribing (both broad and narrow IPA transcription), organising (tagging) and archiving data. The course will look at the nature of the language data that is being recorded: oral vs written; natural speech versus elicited speech; ethnography of communication; varieties of language, borrowing, code-switching, style-shifting and diglossia. A range of analytical approaches will also be addressed. The particular focus of analysis will depend on the student cohort and their specific needs, but will include several of the following: Phonemic Analysis; Orthography Design; Contrastive Analysis (identifying difficulties for language learners); Morphological Analysis; Semantic Analysis; Lexicography; Syntactic Analysis; Analysis of Code-Switching.

    As a result this course will be able to address basic understandings and analytic techniques through practical investigation.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Rob Amery

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Be aware of ethical considerations and observe protocols in linguistic fieldwork
    2 Learn how to record and document languages
    3 Be able to transcribe recordings in IPA (both broad and narrow transcription)
    4 Be familiar with state of the art data storage and archive maintenance
    5 Be able to use dedicated linguistic databases and software (eg Toolbox)
    6 Be familiar with on-line resources for language documentation and preservation
    7 Be able to apply linguistic analytical procedures
    8 Develop strategies for language elicitation and language learning in one-on-one contexts
    9 Perform contrastive analysis and understand the implications for language learners
    10 Be able to present a description and analysis of an aspect of a language in publishable form
    X
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources


    Course text book:
    Bowern, Claire. (2015) Linguistic Fieldwork: A Practical Guide. 2nd edition. Palgrave MacMillan, Basingstoke, UK.

    Available at Coop Bookshop.

    Recommended Resources
    Journal: Language Documentation and Conservation


    S. Bird and G. Simons. 2003. “Seven dimensions of portability for language documentation and description.” Language 79:557-582.

    N. Himmelmann. 1998. “Documentary and descriptive linguistics." Linguistics 36:161-195.

    Seifart, Frank, Geoffrey Haig, Nikolaus P. Himmelmann, Dagmar Jung, Anna Margetts and Paul Trilsbeek (eds). 2012. Potentials of Language Documentation Methods, Analyses and Utilization, Language Documentation & Conversation. Special Publication No. 3. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

    Gippert, Jost & Nikolaus P. Himmelmann & Ulrike Mosel (eds). 2006. Essentials of language documentation. Trends in Linguistics, Studies and Monographs 178, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

    Healy, Alan (ed.) (1975) Language Lerner’s Field Guide. Summer Institute of Linguistics, Ukarumpa, Papua & New Guinea.

    Online Learning
    Research papers, language data and useful web links will be shared through MyUni.

    The following websites have useful on-line resources and numerous additional web links:

    Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD) http://www.rnld.org/

    SOAS Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project http://www.hrelp.org/documentation/whatisit/

    On-Line Resources for Endangered Languages (OREL) http://www.hrelp.org/languages/resources/orel/

    Open Language Archives Community (OLAC): http://www.language-archives.org/

    Ethnologue http://www.ethnologue.com/

    World Atlas of Linguistic Structures (WALS) http://wals.info/

    Paradisec http://www.paradisec.org.au/

    AIATSIS http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/research/resources.html



  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lecture/Seminar/Discussion
    (The class, small groups and individuals will have access to a language informant; or will work with each other, taking turns to act as language informants)
    Demonstration in-situ with language informant;
    Small group discovery tasks working with language informant;
    One-on-one consultation sessions with language informant
    One-on-one or small group instruction in use of software
    Small-group collaborative transcription and analysis sessions
    One-on-one or small group consultation sessions with lecturer

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2 hour seminar/workshop per week (x 12) 24 hours
    6hrs Transcription and Data Analysis per week (from Week 3-13) 66 hours
    6hrs Reading per week (X 13) 78 hours
    6hrs Assignment Preparation per week (X 13) 78 hours
    Research(5hrs pw X 13) + 1hr 66 hours
    TOTAL 312 hours
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction to Field Linguistics; Varieties of Language
    Week 2 Research Ethics and Protocols; Recording Practicalities
    Week 3 IPA & Phonetic Transcription (broad and narrow)
    Week 4 Organising and Archiving Data; Toolbox and other software
    Week 5 Elicitation
    Week 6 Phonemic Analysis and Orthography Design
    Week 7 Contrastive Phonological Analysis
    Week 8 Morphological Analysis
    Week 9 Morphophonemics
    Week 10 Lexicography and Lexical Semantics
    Week 11 Eliciting Syntactic Structures, Syntactic Analysis & Contrastive Syntax
    Week 12 Writing an Analytical Linguistics Paper
    Specific Course Requirements
    Please note that, due to the nature of the Field Linguistics course and taking into account the specific needs of students, the Learning Activities Summary is indicative only. It might be that more or less emphasis will be placed on particular topics depending on the particular language of study and the problems it throws up and the particular interests of the students.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The Field Linguistics class itself will not be large. There will be further opportunity to work in very small groups of 2, 3 or 4 students, sometimes together with the language informant.
    Students are encouraged to work together in small groups in learning how to record and document a language, and in learning how to organise and analyse their data. However, any work presented for assessment must be an original, individual contribution.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Phonological Analysis (1,000 words) Summative

    11 Sept

    20% 2, 3, 7, 8
    Morphological Analysis (1,500 wds) Summative 9 October 20% 7, 8
    Text Analysis (1,500 words) Summative 23 October 20% 7, 8
    Research Article (4,000 words) Summative 10 November 30% 9, 10
    Language Learning Journal Formative 21 Aug, 3 Oct, 3 Nov 10% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
    Assessment Related Requirements

    All assessment components must be completed to qualify for a final result.
    Assessment Detail
    Phonological Analysis (1,000 words)
    Undertake a phonological analysis of the language under study identifying the phonemes and their allophones. Provide evidence for your analysis. Specify the phonotactic constraints. Devise a practical orthography for the language under study.

    Morphological Analysis (1,500 words)
    Provide a comprehensive description of the morphological and morphophonological processes operative within the language under study, including examples to illustrate. Distinguish between inflectional and derivational morphology.

    Text Analysis (1,500 words)
    Record and analyse a text which includes dialog between persons of different status levels (eg royalty in dialog with villages OR middle class parents talking with their children and servants). Provide an interlinear gloss and free translation and a short commentary on differences betwen the different forms of the language used by different speakers.

    Research Article (4,000 words)
    On the basis of data obtained and analysed prepare an article of publishable quality and specifications. This paper may concern a unique, interesting or unusual aspect of the structure of the target language (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, semantics, pragmatics, discourse, politeness strategies etc). (ie genius of the target language) or may seek to show how features of the language do or do not conform to various linguistic theories, typological frameworks etc.

    Alternatively

    Students may prepare a paper on anticipated difficulties speakers of the target language might have in learning and speaking English based on data they have obtained from the language consultant. (ie contrastive analysis) Consider phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic and sociolinguistic aspects (eg politeness strategies)

    Language Learning Journal
    Over the duration of the semester, compile a language learning journal reflecting on your attempts to learn and document the language under study. Your journal should include preparatory steps taken during Weeks 1 and 2 prior to your language learning efforts proper. The journal should identify areas that are particularly challenging and rewarding. The journal will be submitted three times over the semester to enable the Course Coordinator and Language Consultant to provide feedback and/or adjust the delivery of the course.

    Submission
    1.        All assignments (with the exception of the Language Learning Journal) are to be submitted via MyUni.  

    2.        Ensure that your cohort, the Course Title and Assignment Title and Topic appear on the cover sheet.

    3.        All assignments must be typed and in grammatical English. Assignments must be double-spaced with a minimum 12 point font.

    4.        Always keep a copy of your work. (Just occasionally things do go astray)

    5.        Assignments submitted late require a doctor’s certificate, counsellor’s certificate or similar proof/documentation.

    6.        Extensions (normally up to one week) may be negotiated through the Course Coordinator, but this MUST be organised prior to the due date. Application for Assessment Extension forms are found at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/3303/?dsn=policy.document;field=data;id=7446;m=view

    7.      Penalty with no extension is 2% per day up to 7 days (including weekends and plublic holidays).

    8.      Assignments which are more than 7 days overdue without an approved extension will not be accepted.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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