LING 5113 - Language Planning

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

This course will be useful to all postgraduate students of Linguistics who are preparing for their role as researchers and language practitioners. The course will focus on language planning. Students will learn how to perspicaciously analyse multifaceted and complex issues concerning lexical engineering (the concoction of new words), prescriptivism and normativism versus descriptivism and native speech embracement, purism versus cross-fertilization, linguicide (language killing) and linguistic human rights, language revival (reclamation, revitalization and renewal), conscious versus subconscious linguistic evolution, language academies, language and nationhood, language education, the power of the word, the politics of language and the language of politics. It will draw comparisons between a range of language planning phenomena all over the globe such as in Icelandic, Turkish, Estonian, French, Eskayan (southern Philippines), Arabic, Japanese, Chinese and Hawaiian. It will identify common universal constraints on the one hand, and idiosyncratic features, points of difference, on the other hand. It will innovatively classify Constructed Languages (Conlangs) into Auxiliary Languages (Auxlangs) such as Esperanto, Ido and VolapUk, and Artistically-constructed Languages (Artlangs) such as Klingon, Quenya and Tsolyani. Similarly, it will explore and rigorously categorize Revived Languages (Revlangs) into Reclaimed Languages (Reclangs) such as Israeli (Revived Hebrew), Kaurna (Miyurna) and Barngarla, and Renewed Languages (Renlangs) such as Te Reo M'ori and Welsh. We shall also look at language policy and multilingualism, and examine the transparent and camouflaged impact of English on the world's languages.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code LING 5113
    Course Language Planning
    Coordinating Unit Linguistics
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites Completed degree (72 units) including minimum 24 units in Applied Linguistics
    Restrictions Available only to students enrolled in the Master of Arts (Applied Linguistics)
    Course Description This course will be useful to all postgraduate students of Linguistics who are preparing for their role as researchers and language practitioners. The course will focus on language planning. Students will learn how to perspicaciously analyse multifaceted and complex issues concerning lexical engineering (the concoction of new words), prescriptivism and normativism versus descriptivism and native speech embracement, purism versus cross-fertilization, linguicide (language killing) and linguistic human rights, language revival (reclamation, revitalization and renewal), conscious versus subconscious linguistic evolution, language academies, language and nationhood, language education, the power of the word, the politics of language and the language of politics.

    It will draw comparisons between a range of language planning phenomena all over the globe such as in Icelandic, Turkish, Estonian, French, Eskayan (southern Philippines), Arabic, Japanese, Chinese and Hawaiian. It will identify common universal constraints on the one hand, and idiosyncratic features, points of difference, on the other hand.
    It will innovatively classify Constructed Languages (Conlangs) into Auxiliary Languages (Auxlangs) such as Esperanto, Ido and VolapUk, and Artistically-constructed Languages (Artlangs) such as Klingon, Quenya and Tsolyani. Similarly, it will explore and rigorously categorize Revived Languages (Revlangs) into Reclaimed Languages (Reclangs) such as Israeli (Revived Hebrew), Kaurna (Miyurna) and Barngarla, and Renewed Languages (Renlangs) such as Te Reo M'ori and Welsh.

    We shall also look at language policy and multilingualism, and examine the transparent and camouflaged impact of English on the world's languages.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Ghil'ad Zuckermann

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
    1 Think critically and perceptively analyse language issues
    2 Demonstrate awareness of the importance of language for culture, identity and well-being
    3 Demonstrate participation in linguistic activities across the globe
    4 Demonstrate awareness of issues of traditional cultural expressions and Intellectual Property of owners and custodians of the language
    5 Draw comparisons between various languages, identifying comon features and points of difference
    6 Demonstrate and indepth understanding of linguistics which involves drawing on a range of perspectives and source material
    7 Understand the newly-established transdisciplinary field of enquiry 'Revivalistics'
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is delivered through a two-hour seminar. It will provide much of the content, but also provide opportunity for discussion.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2 hour seminar per week 24 hours per semester
    12 hours research per week 144 hours per semester
    7 hours reading per week 84 hours per semester
    5 hours assignment preparation per week 60 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 312 hours per semester


    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 Language Documentation: Indigenous Languages in Brazil: Vitality and Endangerment
    Week 3 Language Surveys: The National Indigenous Languages Survey (NILS) 2 (2014)
    Week 4 Lexical Engineering: What are the mechanisms for coining new words?
    Week 5 Language Reclamation and Education: Should we invest time and money in reclaiming no-longer spoken languages?
    Week 6 Working as a Linguist in Indigenous Education
    Week 7 Constructed Languages: Esperanto, Klingon, Quenya etc
    Week 8 Language Academies and Realistic Prescriptivism
    Week 9 International English and Bilingualism
    Week 10 Standardisation, Destandardisation and Purism in English
    Week 11 A Comparison of Language Planning Measures across Several Nation States: Malay as a Pluricentric Language
    Week 12 Concluding Remarks, Practical and Theoretical Implications
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Course Learning Outcome
    Attendance and participation Formative and Summative 10% 1-7
    Oral presentation Formative and Summative 25% 3, 6, 7
    1000 word assignment Formative and Summative 20% 1, 3, 4, 5, 6
    5000 word post-presentation paper Summative 45% 1, 2, 6, 7
    Assessment Detail
    Attendance and participation - 10% weighting
    Attendance is compulsory. Students will be expected to complete additional exercises and
    small-scale investigations between tutorials which contribute to the weighting.

    Oral presentation - 25% weighting
    Students are required to give an oral presentation (with handouts) on either: making an indepth analysis of any topic related to language planning or conducting a critical review of a book/article
    on language planning.

    1000 word assignment - 20% weighting
    Students submit a 1000 word essay providing Revived Barngarla neologisms for 10 terms, with explanations and justifications.

    5000 word post-presentation paper- 45% weighting
    Students submit a 5000 word paper further analysing the topic chosen for the tutorial oral presentation, incorporating the feedback received on the presentation
    Submission
    All assignments are to be submitted in hard copy, with a signed cover sheet attached, to the School of Humanities Office, Level 7 Napier Building.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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