CHIN 1015 - Chinese and Western Thinking for Chinese Speakers

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2015

The clash between Chinese and western cultures often stems from deep-seated ways of thinking as a result of long standing traditions, cultural philosophies and patterns of reasoning. This course introduces students to some fundamental concepts deeply rooted in Chinese and Western thought that are relevant to understanding ourselves and the multi-cultural world we live in. It will dramatically enhance students' ability to identify and articulate the reasons for cultural misunderstandings. This course encourages students to think critically about how everyday life in different cultures reflects different underpinning approaches and ways of thinking that have developed over time. Examples of concepts and ideas explored in the course include concept of man, cultural foundations of learning, deductive versus inductive reasoning, religion, individualism, tolerance, trust, harmony, happiness, shame, civility, and morals. Through examining similarities and differences in approaches to these concerns in China and the West and tracing their roots within the writing of major thinkers, this course builds a theoretical and methodological foundation to help students articulate, analyse and bridge transcultural borders. The lectures and tutorials are conducted in Chinese, supplemented by English, or in English, supplemented by Chinese, depending on the subject of discussion. The reading material includes texts in both Chinese and English. It provides students with a Chinese language background, either having Chinese as their native language or second language, with skills in thinking, writing and analysing Chinese and Western thought in both Chinese and English, that form a basis for understanding and learning more advanced courses in culture and society at a tertiary level.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CHIN 1015
    Course Chinese and Western Thinking for Chinese Speakers
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites Native or near native Chinese language proficiency (including Chinese dialects) or successful completion of Chinese IIISB or equivalent.
    Assumed Knowledge Advanced knowledge of the Chinese language
    Course Description The clash between Chinese and western cultures often stems from deep-seated ways of thinking as a result of long standing traditions, cultural philosophies and patterns of reasoning. This course introduces students to some fundamental concepts deeply rooted in Chinese and Western thought that are relevant to understanding ourselves and the multi-cultural world we live in. It will dramatically enhance students' ability to identify and articulate the reasons for cultural misunderstandings.

    This course encourages students to think critically about how everyday life in different cultures reflects different underpinning approaches and ways of thinking that have developed over time. Examples of concepts and ideas explored in the course include concept of man, cultural foundations of learning, deductive versus inductive reasoning, religion, individualism, tolerance, trust, harmony, happiness, shame, civility, and morals. Through examining similarities and differences in approaches to these concerns in China and the West and tracing their roots within the writing of major thinkers, this course builds a theoretical and methodological foundation to help students articulate, analyse and bridge transcultural borders.

    The lectures and tutorials are conducted in Chinese, supplemented by English, or in English, supplemented by Chinese, depending on the subject of discussion. The reading material includes texts in both Chinese and English. It provides students with a Chinese language background, either having Chinese as their native language or second language, with skills in thinking, writing and analysing Chinese and Western thought in both Chinese and English, that form a basis for understanding and learning more advanced courses in culture and society at a tertiary level.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Delia Lin

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1 understand the key theoretical issues in Chinese and Western thought and apply them to a real world context.
    2 situate the thought in the historical contexts of its origins and analyse its influences on today’s societies, both Chinese and Western.
    3 articulate a critical understanding of reading material.
    4 engage with unfamiliar texts, both in Chinese and English, including developing academic writing skills in both English and Chinese.
    5 enhance reflexive self-awareness.
    6 demonstrate ability to explain and analyse cultural differences.
    7 understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of a research topic.
    8 locate and critically evaluate debates and literature on the chosen research topic.
    9 develop arguments logically and coherently, both in written form and orally.
    10 work effectively and productively in a group situation.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-10
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4, 8
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5, 6, 7, 9
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4, 5, 6, 10
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 4, 8
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 5, 6, 8
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 6, 10
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 2, 5, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Course reader which contains the set readings for each week
    Recommended Resources
    Chen, Lai. (2010). History of Thought in Late Imperial China (in Chinese). Beijing: San Lian Shudian.

    Fu, Sinian. (2000). Ancient Thoughts on Human Nature and Fate (in Chinese), in The Completed Works of Fu Sinian (Vol. 2), edited by Ouyang Zhesheng, pp. 499-666. Changsha: Hunan Education Press.

    Fung, Yu-Lan. (1948). A Short History of Chinese Philosophy. New York: The Macmillan Company.

    Hobbes, Thomas. (1991). Leviathan. (Revised Student Edition, edited by Richard Tuck). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Jia, Wenshan. (2001). The Remaking of the Chinese Character and Identity in the 21st Century: The Chinese Face Practices. Westport: Ablex Publishing.

    Kirkpatrick, Andy, & Xu, Zhichang. (2012). Chinese Rhetoric and Writing: An Introduction for Language Teachers. Fort Collins, Colorado: The WAC Clearninghouse and Anderson, South Carolina: Parlor Press.

    Li, Zehou. (1999). History of Chinese Thought (in Chinese). He Fei: Anhui Wenyi Chubanshe.

    Li, Jun. (2012). Cultural Foundations of Learning: East and West. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Liu, Xiaofeng (刘小枫). (2001). Salvation and Gallivanting (in Chinese). Shanghai: San Lian Shudian.

    Lock, John. (1980). Second Treatise of Government. (Edited, with an Introduction, by C.B. Macpherson). Indianapolis, Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.

    Munro, Donald J. (1969). The Concept of Man in Early China, Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.

    Munro, Donald J. (1977). The Concept of Man in Contemporary China, Michigan: The University of Michigan Press.

    Russell, Betrand. (1946). History of Western Philosophy. London and New York: Routledge.

    Wolff, Johnathan. (2006). An Introduction to Political Philosophy (revised edition). New York: Oxford University Press.
    Online Learning
    Additional course-related material is available through MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is designed to develop a student-centred strategy to the learning environment and to develop critical analytical skills. Students are asked to actively engage with texts as well as their own experiences, their observations and their own perspectives as transcultural individuals.

    Throughout the semester students will be required to attend a 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial each week.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    4 hours reading per week 48 hours per semester
    4 hours assignment/quiz preparation per week 48 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD HOURS 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction
    Week 2 On Human nature: China and West
    Week 3 Individualism versus altruism: China and West
    Week 4 On education and learning: China and West
    Week 5 Inductive and deductive reasoning
    Week 6 Religion, faith and fate: China and West
    Week 7 Shame and guilt
    Week 8 Happiness, harmony and conflict resolution
    Week 9 Tolerance and freedom
    Week 10 Love in Confucianism, Maoism and Christianity
    Week 11 Civilising processes: China and West
    Week 12 Preparing for take-home paper
    Specific Course Requirements
    Attendance at all classes is compulsory.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Small group discovery is an integral part of the learning process. Techniques such as Think-Pair-Share will be used regularly in tutorials. Accumulative snow-balling techniques will be used to learn complex concepts and texts.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    1000 word reflection paper Formative and Summative 10% 1-10
    Oral presentaton Formative and Summative 15% 1-10
    In-class quizzes Formative and Summative 20% 1-10
    1000 word critical review Formative and Summative 25% 1-10
    2000 word take-home paper Formative and Summative 30% 1-10
    Assessment Detail
    1000 word/character Reflection Paper: students submit a reflection paper designed to enhance student’s reflexive self-awareness and develop students’ skills to use the concepts learned to explain and analyse cultural differences in writing - 10% weighting

    Oral Presentation: Students will work in groups to present information and ideas on their chosen topic and receive feedback from their fellow students that can be incorporated into their critical review and take home paper. Students’ participation in tutorials throughout the semester will also be taken into consideration in the assessment - 15% weighting

    In-class Quizzes: the quizzes are designed to consolidate students’ understanding of key issues and texts - 20% weighting

    1000 word/character Critical Review: Built on the reflection paper, this assessment encourages students to make the transformation from writing personal reflections to writing analytical papers - 25% weighting

    2000 word/character Take Home Paper: students will choose a topic, research it thoroughly and present an argument logically and coherently - 30% weighting
    Submission

    The assignment must be submitted online via the relevant MyUni course site.

    NOTE: Assignment files must be converted to A4 size PDF before being submitted to MyUni - for assistance in converting your assignment file to PDF, please see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/content/ICC_Printed_Assignment_PDF_creation.html

    For instructions on submitting your PDF assignment file to MyUni for marking, please see http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/content/Assignment_-_Submit_an_Assignment__as_a_student.html

    For more assistance on submitting your PDF assignment file to MyUni, please telephone the Service Desk on 831 33000, 8 am – 6 pm, Monday to Friday or email servicedesk@adelaide.edu.au.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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