GSSA 2018 - Gender and Sexuality: Contemporary Perspectives

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

This course will explore one of the most vexed questions of feminism, how can we theorise sexual difference? Students will critically engage with contemporary Australian feminisms and `New' French feminisms, with an eye to their historical roots, in order to understand female psychosexual development and the bodily experience of sexuality. The course encourages students to explore the intersections between gender and sexuality. Important poststructuralist concepts such as language, subjectivity, and discourse will be reviewed. Students will explore questions such as; can language adequately express desire? Can we theorize femininity without theorizing masculinity? Is philosophy inherently masculine? The goal of this course is to provide students with skills to be able to transfer these concepts/ideas to contemporary issues thereby highlighting the interconnectedness of feminist philosophy and practice.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GSSA 2018
    Course Gender and Sexuality: Contemporary Perspectives
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of level 1 undergraduate study
    Course Description This course will explore one of the most vexed questions of feminism, how can we theorise sexual difference? Students will critically engage with contemporary Australian feminisms and `New' French feminisms, with an eye to their historical roots, in order to understand female psychosexual development and the bodily experience of sexuality. The course encourages students to explore the intersections between gender and sexuality. Important poststructuralist concepts such as language, subjectivity, and discourse will be reviewed. Students will explore questions such as; can language adequately express desire? Can we theorize femininity without theorizing masculinity? Is philosophy inherently masculine?

    The goal of this course is to provide students with skills to be able to transfer these concepts/ideas to contemporary issues thereby highlighting the interconnectedness of feminist philosophy and practice.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Pam Papadelos

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Identify major theoretical debates in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
    2 Recognise critical theories and key theorists in Feminism, Masculinity Studies, Queer Theory, and Poststructuralism.
    3 Understand and articulate the political and social dimensions of multiple sexual and gendered orientations.
    4 Apply theoretical knowledge to social problems.
    5 Challenge binaries that structure western thought around gender and sexuality, including sex/gender, man/woman, homosexual/heterosexual.
    6 Work with others in the exploration of ideas and to collectively negotiate solutions to problems
    7 Construct a clear well-argued paper in response to a research question
    8 Use technologies relevant to the University learning environment
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Gender and Sexuality Reader

    The reader can be purchased from the Image and Copy Centre, level 1 Hughes Building open from 10am until 4pm. A copy of the reader will also be lodged in the Reserve Collection of the Barr Smith Library.
    Recommended Resources
    A further reading list will be provided for each topic in the Course Guide, including excerpts from:

    Beasley, C. (2005). Gender & Sexuality: Critical Theories, Critical Thinkers. London: SAGE.

    Braidotti, R. (1994). Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Butler, J. (1990). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. London and New York, Routledge.

    Connell, R. W. (2002). Gender. Malden, MA and Cambridge, UK, Blackwell Publishers.

    Derrida, J. (1976). Of Grammatology (Translated by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Trans.). Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

    Foucault, M. (1976). The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1 (R. Hurley, Trans.). Harmondsworth: Penguin.

    Foucault, M. (1980). Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977. Brighton, Sussex: Harvester Press.

    Gatens, M. (1996). Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality. London and New York: Routledge.

    Grosz, E. (1989). Sexual Subversions: Three French Feminists. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.

    Irigaray, L. (1985). Speculum of the Other Woman. New York, Cornell University Press.

    Lloyd, G. (Ed.). (2002). Feminism and history of philosophy. Oxford : Oxford University Press.

    Marinucci, M. (2010). Feminism is Queer: The Intimate Connection Between Queer and Feminist Theory. London: Zed.

    Srivastava, S. (Ed.). (2013). Sexuality Studies. New Delhi and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Stryker, S. and A. Z. Aizura (Eds.) (2013). The Transgender Studies Reader 2. New York, Routledge.

    Tong, R. (1989). Feminist Thought: A Comprehensive Introduction. London: Westview Press, Inc.
    Online Learning
    The Gender Studies and Social Analysis homepage on the Barr Smith Library site has a list of resources that are useful. Click on the following link:
    http://libguides.adelaide.edu.au/gender_work_socialinquiry

    The MyUni site contains some additional resources and materials that will compliment the material in the reader. Lecture slides will be uploaded each week after the lecture.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course comprises of reading material and recorded lectures supported by tutorial discussion. Students are required to read all the set readings, listen to all the lectures in this course and participate in tutorials.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will commit a total of 156 hours over the semester.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week 1. Introduction
    Week 2. Theory and feminist praxis: The sexual subject
    Week 3. Continental philosophy and feminist theory
    Week 4. Subjectivity: Feminist positions (Radical, Liberal, Materialist etc)
    Week 5. Derrida and deconstruction: Defining ‘woman’
    Week 6. Foucault: Language and discourse
    Week 7. Psychoanalysis: Freud and Lacan
    Week 8. Psychoanalysis and French Feminism
    Week 9. Corporeality: Grosz, Gaten and Disprose
    Week 10. Judith Butler’s Gender Performativity
    Week 11. Presentations
    Week 12. Conclusion: Intersections of gender and sexuality
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task                 Assessment Type                       Learning Objectives
    Tutorial Participation Formative 1,2,3,4,5,6,8
    Key Concepts Paper Summative 1,2,3,4,5,7
    Group Work Formative and Summative 1,2,3,4,5,6,8
    Research Essay Summative 1,2,3,4,5,7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Not Applicable
    Assessment Detail
    Tutorial Participation
    Attend and actively participate in tutorial discussions.  You will be assessed on the level of your contribution.

    Assessment criteria:
    Attend ALL tutorials
    Undertake the required readings
    Demonstrate knowledge of the readings through regular contribution to discussion
    Engage in debate on the topic


    Key Concepts Paper (1000 words)
    Answer set question in essay format.

    Assessment criteria:
    Evidence that critical thinking has been applied – awareness of a number of different theoretical frameworks.
    Demonstrated understanding of concepts and theories in the lectures and readings through their definition and application.
    Appropriate referencing of sources and ideas.
    Correct spelling and grammar.
    Clarity, cohesion and fluency of writing.


    Group Work – Weighting 25% (Wiki postings)
    In groups, students will select an issue to explore (students to brainstorm issues; possible issues include, Gay Marriage, the rise of raunch culture, sex tourism, division of labour and sexualisation of children). They will work together to develop a comprehensive profile on a chosen issue, which will include an academic bibliography and popular representations, such as media reports etc. Students will create a Wiki page on the issue. Students will give feedback to each other on the quality of the pages.

    Assessment criteria:
    Evidence that critical thinking has been applied.
    Demonstrated understanding of concepts and theories in the lectures and readings through their definition and application.
    Appropriate referencing of sources and ideas.
    Correct spelling and grammar.
    Clarity, cohesion and fluency of writing.
    In-depth research on a contemporary issue
    Demonstrate ability to work in groups


    Research Essay (2500 words)

    A list of essay questions will be circulated in week 8. Students will choose one questions from the list.

    Assessment criteria:
    Evidence that critical thinking has been applied.
    Demonstrated understanding of concepts and theories in the lectures and readings through their definition and application.
    Quality, sophistication and perceptiveness of analysis
    Demonstrate familiarity with relevant primary and secondary material
    Appropriate referencing of sources and ideas
    Structure, nature and organisation of the material presented (including length).
    Correct spelling and grammar.
    Clarity, cohesion and fluency of writing.
    Submission
    Your assignments in this course must be submitted ONLINE via the relevant MyUni course site (specific instructions are provided under the Assignment tab).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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