ARTH 2003 - Art Against Society: Censorship & Iconoclasm

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

According to Pablo Picasso art ought to be forbidden to ignorant innocents and never allowed into contact with those not sufficiently prepared - art is dangerous and where it is chaste it is not art. In response to recent controversies concerning religious and sexual transgressions in contemporary art, this course will explore the origins of censorship and iconoclasm in early modern European art and visual culture, particularly during from the fifteenth to seventeenth century during a period of dynamic artistic innovation and tumultuous religious change. In looking to the past to understand the present, the course aims to raise awareness, encourage reflection and stimulate debate on the various ways art has inspired and antagonised individuals and groups in past and present societies and cultures.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ARTH 2003
    Course Art Against Society: Censorship & Iconoclasm
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Prerequisites 12 units of Level 1 study.
    Incompatible HIST 2079
    Restrictions Students must be 18 years of age at the commencement of classes due to the discussion of R rated themes and materials
    Course Description According to Pablo Picasso art ought to be forbidden to ignorant innocents and never allowed into contact with those not sufficiently prepared - art is dangerous and where it is chaste it is not art. In response to recent controversies concerning religious and sexual transgressions in contemporary art, this course will explore the origins of censorship and iconoclasm in early modern European art and visual culture, particularly during from the fifteenth to seventeenth century during a period of dynamic artistic innovation and tumultuous religious change. In looking to the past to understand the present, the course aims to raise awareness, encourage reflection and stimulate debate on the various ways art has inspired and antagonised individuals and groups in past and present societies and cultures.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Lisa Mansfield

    Room 511 Napier Building
    lisa.mansfield@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    There are three contact hours a week composed of a two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1 Understand a broad body of art historical styles and periods from early modern Europe to contemporary society and global culture in the twenty first century.
    2 Analyze works of art and visual culture in past and present contexts using principal methods of analysis employed in the discipline of art history, including formal visual analysis.
    3 Synthesize and critically evaluate argumentative perspectives in art historical scholarship.
    4 Frame logical questions and generate meaningul ideas to construct persuasive evidence based arguments and conclusions.
    5 Communicate effectively within the discipline of art history through essay writing as well as small and large group discussions.
    6 Use relevant technologies proficiently as part of fundamental research skills.
    7 Develop a reflective and objective approach for interrogating contentious issues and complex global problems concerning art censorship and iconoclasm that is socially aware and respectful of different points of view.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2, 3
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3, 4, 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5, 7
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Prescribed readings (journal articles and book chapters) for the course are included in the Course Reader and must be read each week before the relevant tutorial discussions. The Course Reader will be available for purchase from the Image and Copy Centre.

    Recommended Resources
    There is no set textbook for the course. The following books provide useful background reading and will be available in the Barr Smith Library reserve collection:

    d'Alleva, Anne, How to Write Art History. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2006.

    Arnold, Dana, Art History: a very short introduction. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

    Freeland, Cynthia, Art Theory: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

    Stallabrass, Julian, Contemporary Art: A very short introduction. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
    Online Learning
    Additional materials to support the course content and assessment tasks (bibliography, style guide, writing tips, websites, image databases, lecture recordings and powerpoints) will be available on MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Lectures provide introductory, informative and interactive discussions on the history of art censorship and iconoclasm in past and present historical contexts based on a thematic comparative approach that is inclusive of art and visual culture from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century. Weekly tutorials are treated as active and inclusive workshops for interrogating focused case studies on contemporary art transgressions that complement the broad historically based lecture content and themes.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester


    Learning Activities Summary
    The lectures and tutorials explore changing notions of censorship and iconoclasm in relation to past and present art and visual culture from the Renaissance to the twenty first century.

    Themes provide the framework for the course and include: taboo themes in art; the museum and gallery context; rights and responsibilities of the artist; image wars by individuals and collectives; religious transgressions; the naked versus nude body; graffiti art; death and art; and art versus pornography.

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Both lectures and tutorials provide small group discovery experiences. In the second half of the 2-hour lecture, students are divided into small-group 'think tanks' to discuss problems and propose solutions to questions or short quizzes derived from the first half of the lecture within a cooperative learning environment. The tutorials include debates, hypotheticals, and role plays to work through the issues and ideas raised by the weekly themes and relevant prescribed readings.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessment regime consists of:

    (1) Tutorial attendance

    (2) Tutorial activity (weeks 3-10)

    (3) Reflective journal questions (week 4 and 12)

    (4) Comparative visual analysis (week 6)

    (5) Research essay (week 14)

    You will be given more information about submission dates, word limits, questions etc. at the beginning of the course.


    Assessment Related Requirements
    Tutorial participation is compulsory. Students must attend 80% of tutorials to pass the course (unless supporting medical documentation is provided). If you are unable to attend your regular tutorial please contact your tutor in advance as you may be able to attend an alternative tutorial.
    Assessment Detail
    Tutorial activity (weeks 3-10)

    Tutorial topics are allocated to discussion leaders (2-3 students) in the tutorial in week 1 (and no later than week 3) and require completion of the following two tasks: 

    1) Small group presentation
    Should include a concise visual analysis of the relevant work/s of art and provision of either 1-3 questions or a learning activity for small and large group discussion.

    2) Summary statement
    Should consider issues and ideas raised in the prescribed reading (due one week after the tutorial).

    Reflective journal questions

    Two short-answer reflective responses to a choice of questions concerning issues and ideas concerning art censorship and iconoclasm raised in lectures.

    1) Question A due in week 4
    2) Question B due in week 12

    Comparative visual analysis

    Compare and contrast two works of art (from past and present historical contexts) on the same theme from a list of images posted on MyUni.

    Due in week 6

    Research essay

    Questions and a starter bibliography will be available on MyUni in the first week of semester.

    Due in week 14


    Submission

    Electronic submission

    Assignments are to be submitted electronically with a one-step process on Turnitin via MyUni. You will be asked to acknowledge understanding of the policies on plagiarism when submitting. No cover sheet is required. 

    Late penalty

    Work that is submitted after the due date without an approved extension will be deducted 2 points per working day.

    Extension procedures

    Extensions must be applied for using the official procedure http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html unless:

    1) the extension is for two days or less

    2) the assignment is worth 20% or less

    3) the student is registered with the Disability Office and has a Disability Access Plan (DAP) that permit you to negotiate deadlines with the course co-ordinatory directly via email.



    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    The School of History and Politics is committed to upholding the  University's Policy on Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S). All  staff and students have a legal responsibility to act in the interests  of themselves and others with respect to OH&S. For information on the School's contingency plan and emergency procedures, please see the OH&S section on the school website:

    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs/
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.