COMMGMT 2503NA - Small and Family Business Perspectives II

Ngee Ann Academy - Trimester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

The course aims to enhance students' understanding of the characteristics, contributions, and issues surrounding the management and growth of small firms and family businesses. Topics include small firm and family business characteristics and significance, developing a business plan, choice of organisational structure and implications, financing start-up and growth, principles of sound financial management, managing ownership/management/business transitions, role of advisors such as accountants, role of government policy, emerging issues in small firm and family business research. The course will appeal to those who are interested in starting up their own business, as well as those interacting with small firms and family businesses as advisors, managers and policy-makers.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code COMMGMT 2503NA
    Course Small and Family Business Perspectives II
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Ngee Ann Academy
    Units 3
    Course Description The course aims to enhance students' understanding of the characteristics, contributions, and issues surrounding the management and growth of small firms and family businesses. Topics include small firm and family business characteristics and significance, developing a business plan, choice of organisational structure and implications, financing start-up and growth, principles of sound financial management, managing ownership/management/business transitions, role of advisors such as accountants, role of government policy, emerging issues in small firm and family business research. The course will appeal to those who are interested in starting up their own business, as well as those interacting with small firms and family businesses as advisors, managers and policy-makers.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Chris Graves

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    Small firms and family businesses make a significant contribution to the economic development of national economies around the world. According to latest statistics, 96 percent of Australian private sector enterprises are small firms while approximately 67 percent are family-controlled businesses. Just as a small firm is not a little ‘big’ firm, an unlisted privately-owned family business is not a ‘clone’ of a publicly-listed business. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of the issues faced in growing and managing a firm from the small and family business perspectives.

    As a consequence, the overarching objective of this course is for students to understand how business-related issues (such as marketing, management, finance, law and accounting) are applied and / or addressed in the small and family business contexts.

    COMMENCEMENT
    Common pathways in which an individual becomes a small firm or family business owner
    GROWTH
    Issues that owners need to address when growing a small firm or family business
    EXIT
    Ways in which an owner of a small firm or family business ceases to be an owner
    Topic 2: Getting into business: new ventures, franchises, and purchasing or inheriting a business







    Topic 3: Strategic planning and business plans
    Topic 4: Marketing: product, price and promotion decisions
    Topic 5: Financing the business
    Topic 6: Legal issues
    Topic 7: Managing growth & transition
    Topic 8: Accounting issues
    Topic 9: Taxation issues

    Topic 10: Exit – part 1 (succession & next gen)
    Topic 11: Exit – part 2 (decline & closure or turnaround and/or sale)




     

    F O U N D A T I O N: TOPIC 1 - Definition, characteristics and significance of small firms and family businesses
    By the end of this course, students should be able to:
    1. Define and differentiate between what is meant by the terms ‘small firm’ and ‘family business’ and describe their significance and contributions to national economies;
    2. Describe the alternatives to commence working in (or owning) a small firm or a family business and identify their relative advantages and challenges;
    3. Formulate a business plan which outlines a firm’s objectives, business and marketing strategy, management structure, sources of finances and projected financial results.
    4. Identify the family, ownership and business issues that need to be considered when developing a strategic plan for a family business;
    5. Evaluate the appropriateness of a range of interrelated decisions associated with managing an growing a small firm and a family business;
    6. Identify the alternative legal structures available to small firms and choose the most appropriate form according to the objectives and needs of the owners;
    7. Evaluate the appropriateness of a firm’s management structure and processes in place based on its stage of development and growth;
    8. Identify the issues that need to be addressed when planning for succession to the next generation;
    9. Describe common reasons why firms become financially distressed and identify what steps can be taken to enact a turnaround;
    10. Develop an ability to apply the course concepts, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems.
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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