PUB HLTH 7085 - Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project is designed to provide students with the opportunity to apply the components of health economic evaluation in detail, in the context of an applied evaluation that is completed in full, from specification of the research question to the drafting of a journal manuscript. The course builds on the Health Economic Evaluation and Decision Making (PUB HLTH 7082), which provides the background and theory to each of the components of a health economic evaluation. Students are provided with relevant materials and instruction relating to the review of background material, the specification of an appropriate model structure, estimation of disease progression and treatment effect parameter values, conduct of a quality of life study, analysis of resource use and cost data, consideration of outcomes other than quality adjusted life years, and the analysis and representation of uncertainty of the finished model. On course completion, students will have practical experience in the conduct of health economic evaluation which will cement the knowledge gained in the existing HEEDM course and provide the basis for conducting independent evaluations in a wide range of employment settings (e.g. government, NGO, industry, academia).

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PUB HLTH 7085
    Course Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project
    Coordinating Unit Public Health
    Term Semester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 5 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites PUB HLTH 7081, PUB HLTH 7082, ECON 7001, ECON 7220
    Restrictions Master of Health Economics and Policy
    Course Description Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project is designed to provide students with the opportunity to apply the components of health economic evaluation in detail, in the context of an applied evaluation that is completed in full, from specification of the research question to the drafting of a journal manuscript. The course builds on the Health Economic Evaluation and Decision Making (PUB HLTH 7082), which provides the background and theory to each of the components of a health economic evaluation. Students are provided with relevant materials and instruction relating to the review of background material, the specification of an appropriate model structure, estimation of disease progression and treatment effect parameter values, conduct of a quality of life study, analysis of resource use and cost data, consideration of outcomes other than quality adjusted life years, and the analysis and representation of uncertainty of the finished model. On course completion, students will have practical experience in the conduct of health economic evaluation which will cement the knowledge gained in the existing HEEDM course and provide the basis for conducting independent evaluations in a wide range of employment settings (e.g. government, NGO, industry, academia).
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Jonathan Karnon

    Course Coordinator: Prof Jon Karnon
    Phone: +61 8313 3562
    Email: jonathan.karnon@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Level 7, 178 North Terrace

    Student & Program Support Services Hub
    Email: askhealthsc@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: +61 8313 0273

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Experience in the practical application of health economic evaluation
    2 Literature reviewing of published economic studies, and to identify relevant clinical data
    3 Design and application of a quality of life (QoL) study to collect relevant data
    4 Extraction of relevant cost data from routine data sources
    5 Statistical analysis of clinical, QoL, and cost data
    6 Development and population of a decision analytic model as the framework for the economic evaluation
    7 Analysis of model, including sensitivity analyses
    8 Assess factors others than costs and QALYs that may influence funding decisions
    9 Reporting of results of analysis
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    3, 6, 7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    9
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3, 6, 7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    8
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The new Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project course builds on the skills gained in  the existing course Health Economic Evaluation and Decision Making (HEEDM) (PubHlth 7082), leading to the completion of an applied research project. HEEDM   takes students through the theory of the elements of health economic evaluation, with short practicals. The aim of the research  project course is to provide students with an opportunity to apply the elements in more detail, and with more independence.

    Each student will be assigned a health care intervention to evaluate. Students will be instructed on how to search for, and review the literature relevant to their assigned evaluation. These elements include the estimation of the clinical and quality of life parameters. For the cost elements, relevant data, and data sources will be provided. A longitudinal dataset will be provided for analysis by students,  and data sources for unit cost parameters will be provided.

    Checklist papers for reporting the results of health economic evaluations will be also be provided.

    Recommended Resources
    J Brazier, J Ratcliffe, J Salomon, A Tsuchiya, Measuring and Valuing Health Benefits for Economic Evaluation, 2007, ISBN10:  0198569823: Oxford University Press

    A Briggs, M Sculpher, K Claxton, Decision Modelling for Health Economic Evaluation, 2006, ISBN10: 0198526628. Oxford University Press

    M Drummond, M Sculpher, G Torrence, B O'Brien, G Stoddart, Methods for the Economic Evaluation of Health Care Programmes (3rd  Edition) 2005; ISBN10: 0198529453: Oxford University Press

    Online Learning
    Refer to MyUni
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The new Applied Health Economic Evaluation Research Project 6 unit course will build on the skills students obtained in the existing  HEEDM 3 unit course. As the existing HEEDM course completes its coverage of each element of health economic evaluation,  students enrolled Research Project course will be provided with relevant materials or data sources relating to that element.  Students will then undertake the necessary tasks to complete the estimation/analysis of that element in the context of their  chosen case study evaluation.

    The course is one where independent research is undertaken with the guidance of a supervisor.  During the course, students will  participate in a 2 to 3 hour weekly group session that will provide general and specific guidance on the research tasks to be undertaken.

    Additionally, students will be allocated an Academic Advisor who has expertise in the topic selected by the student.  Students can  access this Advisor 2-3 times throughout the course (2 hours each).  These Advisors will be sourced from within and outside the  University (e.g. using health economists based at Flinders University and UniSA, where research interests coincide).

    In between formal teaching sessions, discussion via MyUni between students, and with the course co-ordinator, will be encouraged to address roadblocks to the application of the evaluation elements as and when they occur.

    The Research Projects course is only to be offered to Masters of Health Economics and Policy students.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Up to 5 hours per week
    Learning Activities Summary
    The existing HEEDM course includes the following learning activities:

    1.    Rationale for economic evaluation to inform decision making in health
    2.    Principles and theory relating to the components of an economic evaluation in health
    3.    Examples of the application of economic evaluation to decision making in health

    In addition, the weekly group sessions for the Research Project course will  provide additional practical sessions on the following  topics: 

    4.    Conducting a background review and Developing a research question
    5.    Defining a model structure for health economic evaluation
    6.    Populating the baseline clinical parameters and estimates of treatment effect
    7.    Conducting a quality of life study to inform health state utilities
    8.    Analysing cost data
    9.    Building model and undertaking base case analyses
    10.  Handling uncertainty – sensitivity analysis
    11.  Assessing equity factors – outcomes other than QALYs
    12.  Reporting – in the form of a journal manuscript
    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    N/A
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning course objective(s) being addressed
    Short report on selected evaluation framework Summative 15% 2,4,5
    Short report on methods and analysis of  clinical data (disease progression and treatment effect data) Summative 15% 3,6
    Short report on methods and analysis of  cost and outcomes data Summative 15% 7,8,11
    Implemented cost-effectiveness model Summative 25% 9,10
    Manuscript in format of journal submission Summative 30% 1,2,12
    Assessment Related Requirements
    N/A
    Assessment Detail
    The course has three assessment points: short reports on the elements of the applied economic model, development of the
    model and the final report based on the analysis of the model.
           
    Short reports (3 x 1000 words) on each of the following elements of an applied economic evaluation to be undertaken by each student: (15% each)

    Evaluation framework
    This report will cover the process of selecting and developing an appropriate modelling technique as the framework for their applied evaluation. Elements of the report include:

    The results of a summary review of the literature to identify an appropriate model structure,

    The identification of key events or health states associated with the progression of the condition (or disease) to which the  evaluation is being applied (i.e. for which alternative technologies are being evaluated),

    A description of the assumptions around disease progression that are reflected in the model structure (i.e. all models are  simplifications of reality) and justifications for those assumptions.

    Estimation of Clinical parameters
    This report will cover the process of identifying and analysing relevant cost data for their applied evaluation. Elements of the report include:

    A listing of all the clinical parameters to be estimated,

    A description of the data sources to be used to populate the clinical parameters (students will be provided with relevant clinical  data, after the submission of the first short report, i.e. the structure defined in report 1 may be adjusted to fit the available data),

    The methods and results of analyses of the data to populate the clinical parameters.

    Measurement of costs and outcomes
    This report will cover the process of generating appropriate measures of outcome for their applied evaluation. In most cases, this  will involve the collection of utility data, reflecting the health-related quality of life that patients experience as their disease  progresses. Elements of the report include:

    A summary review of the existing literature on existing cost, cost-effectiveness, utility and quality of life studies in the relevant  disease area,

    The methods (e.g. design and application) and results of a pilot utility study to generate utility weights for the relevant events and  health states included in the model structure,

    The identified resource and cost parameter values required to populate the model. 
     
    Model: A developed, populated, and analysed (spread sheet-based) decision analytic model.(25%)

    Report: A draft manuscript reporting the results of each student’s applied economic evaluation (30%)
    Submission
    Extensions
    All extensions for assignments must be requested, at the latest, by the last working day before the due date of submission.  Extensions will generally be granted only on medical or genuine compassionate grounds.  Supporting documentation must be  provided at the time a student requests an extension.  Without documentation, extensions will not be granted.  Late requests for extension will neither be accepted nor acknowledged.

    Only the Course Co-ordinator(s) may grant extensions.

    Supporting documentation will be required when requesting an extension. Examples of documents that are acceptable include: a  medical certificate that specifies dates of incapacity, a police report (in the case of lost computers, car & household theft etc.), a  letter from a Student Counsellor, Education and Welfare Officer (EWO) or Disability Liaison Officer that provides an assessment of  compassionate circumstances, or a letter from an independent external counsellor or appropriate professional able to verify the  student’s situation.  The length of any extension granted will take into account the period and severity of any incapacity or impact  on the student.  Extensions of more than 10 days will not be granted except in exceptional circumstances.

    Late submission 
    Marks will be deducted when assignments for which no extension has been granted are handed in late.

    All assignments, including those handed in late, will be assessed on their merits.  In the case of late assignments where no  extension has been granted, 5 percentage points of the total marks possible per day will be deducted.  If an assignment that is 2  days late is awarded 65% on its merits, the mark will then be reduced by 10% (5% per day for 2 days) to 55%.  If that same  assignment is 4 days late, the mark will be reduced by 20% (5% per day for 4 days) to 45%, and so on.

    The School of Public Health reserves the right to refuse to accept an assignment that is more than 7 days late.

    Assignments submitted after the due date may not be graded in time to be returned on the listed return dates.

    Students submitting examinable written work who request (and receive) an extension that takes them beyond the examination  period are advised that there is no guarantee that their grades will be processed in time to meet usual University deadlines.

    Resubmission
    If a student is dissatisfied with an assessment grade they should follow the Student Grievance Resolution Process  <https://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/grievance/process/>.  Students who are not satisfied with a particular assessment result should raise their concerns with Course Co-ordinator(s) in the first instance.  This must be done within 10 business days of the  date of notification of the result.  Resubmission of any assignment is subject to the agreement of the Course Co-ordinator(s) and  will only be permitted for the most compelling of reasons.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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