HLTH SC 2102 - Principles of Exercise Science

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

As a practicing exercise scientist you will be expected to apply knowledge and skills, and a rationale for the provision of exercise to enhance physiological function in normal and healthy populations. This process requires a knowledge of the physiological responses and longer term adaptations to endurance and resistance (weight) training. This course will present students with the theoretical basis as well as provide opportunities to develop practical skills in the prescription of exercise. In addition students will be required to understand and apply the principles of assessment of physiological and functional capacity enabling the outcome of a physical activity/exercise intervention to be determined. Upon successful completion of this course, students will possess the skills to design safe, appropriate and effective exercise programs that are aligned with client needs and goals. Furthermore, students can appropriately modify, progress or regress an exercise program through the manipulation and integration of intensity, duration, frequency and modality of exercise to meet client needs and goals. This will require students to have a sound understanding of the potential contraindications to exercise as well as the psychosocial barriers to maintaining and adhering to exercise.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 2102
    Course Principles of Exercise Science
    Coordinating Unit Medicine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites ANAT SC 1102 & ANAT SC 1103
    Assumed Knowledge PHYSIOL 2510
    Course Description As a practicing exercise scientist you will be expected to apply knowledge and skills, and a rationale for the provision of exercise to enhance physiological function in normal and healthy populations. This process requires a knowledge of the physiological responses and longer term adaptations to endurance and resistance (weight) training. This course will present students with the theoretical basis as well as provide opportunities to develop practical skills in the prescription of exercise. In addition students will be required to understand and apply the principles of assessment of physiological and functional capacity enabling the outcome of a physical activity/exercise intervention to be determined. Upon successful completion of this course, students will possess the skills to design safe, appropriate and effective exercise programs that are aligned with client needs and goals. Furthermore, students can appropriately modify, progress or regress an exercise program through the manipulation and integration of intensity, duration, frequency and modality of exercise to meet client needs and goals. This will require students to have a sound understanding of the potential contraindications to exercise as well as the psychosocial barriers to maintaining and adhering to exercise.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Adrian Elliott

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Describes the principles of delivery and rational for endurance, resistance and flexibility exercise training.
    2 Write and evaluative report on the physical and physiological characteristics of a healthy person and how this informs exercise training prescription.
    3 Analyses and interprets data obtained using advanced techniques in exercise science on exercise physiological function and physical activity level in a healthy person.
    4 Critically evaluates and presents the scientific evidence surrounding the physiological responses and adaptations associated with changes in physiological function following resistance, endurance or flexibility exercise training.
    5 Understands the fundamental application of techniques and knowledge in the sub disciplines of exercise science (exercise psychology, biomechanics and exercise physiology).
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 3, 4, 5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 3, 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3, 4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2, 3, 4, 5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    2, 3, 4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    TEXTBOOK
    ACSM’s resource manual for guidelines for exercise testing and prescription. 7th edition. 2010. Lipincott Williams and Wilkins
    Recommended Resources
    Griffin, J.C. Client Centered Exercise Prescription. (2006). 2nd edition. Human Kinetics
    McArdle, W.D., Katch, F.I. and Katch, V.L. (2010). Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, and Human Performance. Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. 7th ed.

    Wasserman, K., Hansen, J.E., Sue, D.Y., Casaburi, R. and Whipp, B.J. (2004) Principles of exercise testing and interpretation : including pathophysiology and clinical applications. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, USA. 4th ed. (in reserve collection)

    The lecturer throughout the semester to supplement the prescribed text will provide additional reading in the form of journal articles.
    Online Learning
    MyUni
    All material related to this course will be housed on the MyUni page for this course.

    E Modules
    Students will complete 2 x 30 min e-module per week. The module will include presentation of didactic audio visual material using articulate/articulate storyline which can be viewed online. The module will be supported with required reading material (textbook or journal article). This approach is used to present information on the theme of the week. Formative assessment and feedback for students will be provided for students via 1 x 20 question quiz each fortnight. Students will able to obtain an understanding of the relevant material prior to the material being discussed and applied in subsequent practical and tutorial sessions ie a ‘flipped’ class room approach.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will be delivered via the use of both electronic (e-module) and face to face strategies, i.e. a ‘blended approach’

    E Modules
    See details above

    Small group learning sessions
    These classes provide a smaller-group and focused learning environment than a lecture. Tutorial sessions will be structured to encourage solving of problems related to case studies and focus questions presented in conjunction with the e-modules thereby exploring issues in a practical setting. Problem based learning will be included to reinforce knowledge and concepts concerning practical aspects of exercise prescription.

    Practical Sessions
    Students will attend one practical class of 2 hrs duration each week. The purpose of the practical sessions is to develop practical skills in exercise testing and prescription necessary for more advanced units in exercise science. Therefore 85% attendance is required at all practical and seminar sessions .
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will be required to attend 3 hrs per week of face to face classes (1x1hr tutorial and 1 x 2hr practical class). In addition students will complete 2 x 30 min module (see details above). It is expect the students will complete an additional 2 hrs of work to prepare for the e modules, tutorial and practical classes. This excludes the additional time required to complete assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week  e Lecture 1 Tutorial e Lecture 2 Practical
    Week 1 Exercise screening and risk evaluation Pre exercise screening procedures I Principles of exercise testing Exercise testing I
    Week 2 Overview of exercise science sub disciplines Pre exercise screening proceedures II Principles of exercise training Exercise testing II
    Week 3 Exercise psychology
    Small group discovery project (1)
    Overview of cardiorespiratory exercise training and exercise adherence  Barriers to physical activity/goal setting
    Week 4 Acute responses to exercise I: metabolic Energy metabolism, exercise and fatigue Cardiorespiratory fitness Assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness
    Week 5 Methods of cardiorespiratory exercise training Cardiorespiratory exercise progression: case studies Maximal aerobic power (VO2max): implications for health and sports performance Maximal exercise stress testing
    Week 6 Acute responses to exercise: cardiovascular and endocrine systems Small group discovery project (2) Adaptations to cardiorespiratpry exercise training Interval training
    Week 7 Anaerobic training and metabolism Anaerobic training progressions Measurement of anaerobic capacity Anaaerobic testing
    Week 8 Balance and agility Small group project development (3) Methods of agility testing Agility testing
    Week 9 Musculoskeletal exercise prescription I: free and machine weight exercise Resistance training: needs analysis, design and safety Significance of muscular strength and power Muscular strength assessment
    Week 10 Musculoskeletal exercise prescription II: progression of resistance training Musculoskeletal exercise prescription: case studies Principles of Biomechanics and functional anatomy Gym based resistance training
    Week 11 Adaptations to resistance training Group project Presentations Functional exercise training Functional exercise training
    Week 12 Stretching and range of motion Group project Presentations Assessment of range of motion Assessment of flexibility
    Week 13 Professional aspects of exercise science practice Group project Presentations Developing flexibility training Stretching techniques
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will complete a small group discovery project (assignment task 2) in groups of 4-6 students. The project will be presented verbally (20 min presentation) in the last 3 weeks of the semester. Students will then submit individually a short (1500 word) on a specific aspect of the presentation area. The progression of the project will be monitored and guided by academic staff in 3 individual tutorial classes throughout the semester. The nature of the discovery project will concern the mechanisms surrounding changes in human physiological function with exercise training.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Exercise assessment report Summative 20% 2-3
    Presentation and report (discovery project) Summative 40% 1, 4
    Final exams Summative 30% 1-5
    E modules/quiz Formative 10% 1-5
    Assessment Detail
    TASK 1: Pre activity screening document/assessment report (20% of the final grade)

    The aim of the first assessment task is conduct a general exercise and health assessment (comprising anthropometry and submaximal aerobic testing) on a real client (to be done in the practical classes). You must then write a report on the results. Within the report you must compare the results to normative values then make comment on the significance of the results with reference to scientific material. You must also conduct a pre-activity evaluation prior to the assessment and obtain as much information on the person’s medical history, physical activity patterns and psycho social barriers to exercise. The report must also outline recommended strategies for improving the functional capacity of the person relative to appropriate goal setting. Students will be required to design and implement a pre activity screening document. A report will be made of the findings of this document as well as a exercise assessment enabling recommendations to be made for an exercise plan for a healthy person.

    TASK 2: Discovery Project (40% of the final grade)
    Details see section 4.5

    TASK 3: Final Exam (Exam Period; 30% of the final grade)
    The purpose of the final exam is to test your understanding of the theoretical and practical concepts covered during the semester. The exam will be of 120 min duration and comprise long answer and essay type questions.

    TASK 4: QUIZ (10% of final grade)
    Students will complete a series multiple choice questions (MCQ) each fortnight. The purpose of each quiz is to guide learning, generate discussion as well as assess each students level of understanding of the relevant material. 80% of quiz must be completed for a pass grade to be awarded for the course.
    Submission
    Submission/release of results of assignments (1-2) will be performed via turnitin. Quiz will be offered via myuni with results released in the grade book of myuni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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