PETROGEO 4013 - Geo-Energy Systems in Sedimentary Basins

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2022

PETROGEO 4013 presents an integrated course containing modules focusing on the definition of geological energy systems within sedimentary basins, covering both conventional and unconventional petroleum resources, gas energy storage and by-product sequestration resources, water resources and geothermal resources. This course covers a range of topics related to the key elements and processes of a petroleum system, and applies this resource system concept to define the operating components of the other geological energy systems in sedimentary basins that will become key parts of the energy transition. The course will progress to focus on basin analysis and history modelling that accounts for the development of resources over geological time to the present day, and predicts evolving basin conditions for ongoing extractive, storage and disposal energy operations of the future. This course will begin with a two week field trip to New Zealand {or Tasmania, should international travel not be possible) to take place in late February prior to the beginning of Semester 1. This trip will be shared with student cohorts undertaking BSc Honours in Geology or Geophysics with the faculty of Sciences {those undertaking GEOLOGY 4010A & GEOLOGY 4010B or GEOLOGY 4030A & GEOLOGY 4030B respectively). Focused experiences on this trip will provide a broad, conceptual framework for the way sedimentary basins function as current & future energy resources. In doing so, they will provide a pre-classroom introduction to the key technical topic areas of energy exploration geoscience, namely: sedimentology, stratigraphy, diagenesis, structural geology, geomechanics, reservoirs, seals, conventional pay and trapping systems.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PETROGEO 4013
    Course Geo-Energy Systems in Sedimentary Basins
    Coordinating Unit Australian School of Petroleum
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per day (classroom sessions taught in intensive short-course mode ? 3.5 classroom days required)
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Corequisites PETROGEO 4010, PETROGEO 4015 & PETROGEO 4016
    Incompatible PETROGEO 4011, PETROGEO 4012, PETROGEO 4014
    Assumed Knowledge Bachelor's degree training or equivalent in geoscience.
    Restrictions Bachelor of Science Honours in Petroleum Geology & Geophysics (to be renamed BSc Hons in Energy Geoscience).
    Course Description PETROGEO 4013 presents an integrated course containing modules focusing on the definition of geological energy systems within sedimentary basins, covering both conventional and unconventional petroleum resources, gas energy storage and by-product sequestration resources, water resources and geothermal resources. This course covers a range of topics related to the key elements and processes of a petroleum system, and applies this resource system concept to define the operating components of the other geological energy systems in sedimentary basins that will become key parts of the energy transition. The course will progress to focus on basin analysis and history modelling that accounts for the development of resources over geological time to the present day, and predicts evolving basin conditions for ongoing extractive, storage and disposal energy operations of the future.
    This course will begin with a two week field trip to New Zealand {or Tasmania, should international travel not be possible) to take place in late February prior to the beginning of Semester 1. This trip will be shared with student cohorts undertaking BSc Honours in Geology or Geophysics with the faculty of Sciences {those undertaking GEOLOGY 4010A & GEOLOGY 4010B or GEOLOGY 4030A & GEOLOGY 4030B respectively). Focused experiences on this trip will provide a broad, conceptual framework for the way sedimentary basins function as current & future energy resources. In doing so, they will provide a pre-classroom introduction to the key technical topic areas of energy exploration geoscience, namely:
    sedimentology, stratigraphy, diagenesis, structural geology, geomechanics, reservoirs, seals, conventional pay and trapping systems.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Simon Holford

    Petroleum Systems: Dr Simon Holford
    Amadeus Basin Fieldtrip coordinator and sedimentology/stratigraphy: Prof. Peter McCabe
    Amadeus Basin structural geology: Dr Khalid Amrouch
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     
    1 Have specialised knowledge in petroleum geoscience disciplines related to petroleum systems especially sedimentology, stratigraphy, structural geology and basin evolution
    2 Be able to both independently and as a team critically analyse and synthesise complex information in order to interpret data from regional geologic observations. 
    3 Be able to communicate their knowledge and understanding to specialist audiences.

     
    The above course learning outcomes are aligned with the Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standard for the Professional Engineer.
    The course is designed to develop the following Elements of Competency: 1.1   1.2   1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   3.1   3.2   3.3   3.4   3.5   3.6   

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1-3

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    1-3

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    1-3

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    1-3

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    1-3

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    1-3
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course will be taught in both an intensive format module and a 10-day fieldtrip scheduled during Semester 1. Activities will include lectures and practicals. Students actively participate in the fieldtrip to central Australia including making observations, group discussions, and teamwork. Course information and material will be provided through MyUni.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    During the dates of the intensive format module, students are expected to attend class each weekday, between 9am and 5pm. Participation in all aspects of the fieldtrip is required. Coursework activities to be completed outside of class time are a part of the expected student workload within this course.
    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    A
    Assessment Task Weighting (%) Individual/ Group Formative/ Summative
    Due (week)*
    Hurdle criteria Learning outcomes
    In class assessment 9.9 Individual Formative / Summative Week 3 1. 2. 3.
    Petroleum systems chart 3.3 Individual Formative / Summative Week 5 1. 2. 3.
    Take home examination 19.8 Individual Formative Exam period 1. 2. 3.
    Field trip assessment 67 Individual Formative / Summative Week 12 1. 2. 3.
    Total 100
    * The specific due date for each assessment task will be available on MyUni.
     
    This assessment breakdown complies with the University's Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy.

    Due to the current COVID-19 situation modified arrangements have been made to assessments to facilitate remote learning and teaching. Assessment details provided here reflect recent updates.

    The assessment for Simon’s component of the course (33%) remains unchanged – the marks for the in class test and petroleum systems chart will be returned next week, and there will still be a take home exam.
    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M11 (Honours Mark Scheme)
    GradeGrade reflects following criteria for allocation of gradeReported on Official Transcript
    Fail A mark between 1-49 F
    Third Class A mark between 50-59 3
    Second Class Div B A mark between 60-69 2B
    Second Class Div A A mark between 70-79 2A
    First Class A mark between 80-100 1
    Result Pending An interim result RP
    Continuing Continuing CN

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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