WINE 7004 - Contemporary Issues in Wine Business (M)

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 1 - 2015

This course explores current issues of interest to the wine industry due to their potential to change industry landscape, international competitiveness or reflect changing consumer preferences and/or buying habits. Topics include the roles of wine and alcohol in society and their implications for health and government policy, changes in consumer to consumer forms of communication and social media and the growing importance of the roles of corporate social responsibility and ethics (as examples).

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code WINE 7004
    Course Contemporary Issues in Wine Business (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course explores current issues of interest to the wine industry due to their potential to change industry landscape, international competitiveness or reflect changing consumer preferences and/or buying habits. Topics include the roles of wine and alcohol in society and their implications for health and government policy, changes in consumer to consumer forms of communication and social media and the growing importance of the roles of corporate social responsibility and ethics (as examples).
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Ulrich Orth

    Lecturer: Prof Ulrich Orth
    Location: 10 Pulteney Street, Nexus Building (Rm 1013)
    Email: uorth@ae.uni-kiel.de
    Course Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    This course is being presented in intensive mode with seminars, tutorials and group works (lunch and breaks) commencing and concluding on each of the days scheduled below. Sessions will be held at the venues specified below.
     
    Session 1 Feb 27, 2015: 09:00-16:30 hrs, Nexus 10, UB40

    Session 2 Feb 28, 2015: 09:00-16:30 hrs, Nexus 10, UB40

    Session 3 Mar 5, 2015: 10:00-17:00 hrs, Marjoribanks 128, Bank SA Suite

    Session 4 Mar 6, 2015: 09:00-16:00 hrs, Marjoribanks 126, Santos Theatre

    Session 5 Mar 5, 2015: 09:00-16:00 hrs, Marjoribanks 126, Santos Theatre



    All activities will be recorded for the benefit of students that are studying remotely.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The course requires students to engage in student-driven research in a small team context working under the guidance of Prof Orth. To properly craft and refine their brand concept they must devise an appropriate research strategy to locate information from self-determined sources and, working together, rigorously evaluate the information using criteria based on experience, expertise and literature. They must identify specific knowledge gaps and determine and appropriate methodology for synthesising, organising and applying the knowledge to fill those gaps. The art and science of successful brand management requires adopting a highly structured approach that applies the insights obtained through the lectures to creatively solve a practical problem. In addition, students are required to persuasively communicate their brand concept to a range of audiences using discipline specific and appropriate language.

    Hence, this course aims to develop and enhance the skills needed to effectively create and manage a brand, work in a small team context, show leadership and cooperation to achieve the required outcome. This involves data collection, interviewing, and ultimately, report writing including strategic recommendations. Finally, the continuing development of good research, teamwork, inter-personal and communication skills is widely recognised as important for all graduates.

    By the end of this course students should be able to accomplish the following Learning Outcomes (LO):

    1. A comprehensive understanding of how to create a brand. Specifically: (1) to understand how to synchronize a brand with a product, (2) to recognize the range and options for brand communications, (3) to understand how to match a brand to target groups, (4) to recognize the potential of brand communication means, and (5) to understand strategic options for building brand-consumer relationships.
    2. The ability to work effectively as a team member, showing leadership and cooperation as required to enhance group outcomes;
    3. The ability to design a simple experiment and conduct it to effectively collect relevant primary information;
    4. A comprehensive understanding of and the ability to apply basic secondary data collection and evaluation;
    5. The ability to communicate, clarify, and present to professional audiences; and
    6. The ability to produce a logical and coherent group Research Report that provides value to stakeholders.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 2, 3, 4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2, 5, 6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1, 3, 5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. All
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 2, 6
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. All
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no prescribed text for this course, but a comprehensive reading list relevant to topic discussions is provided below. However, it is expected that students will look beyond these resources and find additional literature of value.

    • Aaker, Jennifer L. (1997), “Dimensions of Brand Personality,” Journal of Marketing Research, 34(August), 347-356.
    • Aaker, Jennifer L. (1999). “The Malleable Self: The Role of Self-Expression in Persuasion”, Journal of Marketing Research, 36 (February): 45-57.
    • Johnson, T., and J. Bruwer (2003). “An Empirical Confirmation of Wine-related Lifestyle Segments in the Australian Wine Market.” International Journal of Wine Marketing, 15(1): 5-33.
    • Ulrich R. Orth, and Roberta C. Crouch (2014), Is Beauty in the Aisles of the Retailer? Package Processing in Visually Complex Contexts, Journal of Retailing, Available online 14 June 2014, ISSN 0022-4359, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jretai.2014.05.004.
    • Orth, U.R., Bouzdine-Chameeva, and Brand, K. (2013), "Trust during retail encounters: A touchy proposition,” Journal of Retailing, 89(3), 301-314.
    • Orth, U., Heinrich, F., Malkewitz, K. (2012), "Servicescape interior design and consumers' personality impressions," Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 26 (3), 194 – 203.
    • Orth, U. R., Stöckl, A., Veale, R., Brouard, J., Cavicchi, A., Faraoni, M., Larreina, M., Lecat, B., Olsen, J., Rodriguez-Santos, C., Santini, C., Wilson, D. (2011), "Using attribution theory to explain tourists' attachments to place-based brands," Journal of Business Research, 65 (9), 1321-1327.
    • Orth, U., D. Campana, and K. Malkewitz (2010): "Formation of Consumer Price Expectation based on Package Design: Attractive and Quality Routes," Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 18(1), 23-40.
    • Orth, Ulrich R., Lynn R. Kahle (2008), "Intrapersonal Variation in Consumer Susceptibility to Normative Influence: Toward a Better Understanding of Brand Choice Decisions," Journal of Social Psychology, 148(4), 423-448.
    • Orth, Ulrich R. and Keven Malkewitz (2008), "Holistic Package Design and Consumer Brand Impressions,"Journal of Marketing, Vol. 72 (May), 64–81.
    • Orth,Ulrich R. and Renate De Marchi (2007),"Understanding the Relations between Functional, Symbolic, and Experiential Brand Beliefs, Product Experiential Attributes, and Product Schema: Advertising-Trial Interactions Revisited," Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 15 (3),219-233.
    • Orth, Ulrich R. (2005), "Consumer Personality and other Factors in Situational Brand Choice Variation," Journal of Brand Management, 13(2), 115-133.
    • Orth, Ulrich R., Marianne McGarry Wolf and Tim H. Dodds (2005), "Dimensions of Wine Region Equity and Their Impact on Consumer Preferences,"Journal of Product and Brand Management, 14(2), 88-97.
    • Orth, U. and P. Krska (2002), "Quality Signals in Wine Marketing," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, 4, 385-397.
    Recommended Resources
    Students have access to library and electronic databases and use of these and other sources of legitimate information, such as industry journals and other publications are recommended when appropriate.
    Online Learning
    All topic lectures and most discussions will be recorded for the benefit of those that can’t attend the sessions. A comprehensive reading list will also be available in addition to lecture slides (although this is not a ‘slide intensive’ course) etc. All resources will be available via the course MyUni site. All assessments are to be provided electronically and will be marked and returned electronically via the Turnitin portal on the MyUni site.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is delivered during 5 intensive days of teaching over the trimester period. During these 6-hour sessions (which of course will include lunch and short breaks) students will engage in lectures, tutorial discussions and applied problem solving via group works. The focus of the course will be an interactive brand concept development with Prof Orth and fellow group members. For students studying remotely, all lecture and tutorial sessions will be recorded. However, it is expected that group members will maintain close contact between intensive sessions in order to complete the required tasks and maximise learning outcomes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This informationis provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.The University expects full-time students to commit approximately 9 hours for a three-unit course of private study outside of your regular classes. Students in this course are expected to attend sessions in this intensive delivery mode course if at all possible. Students studying remotely must review session recordings and stay in touch with the lecturer and their group members as required to maintain contact and group cohesion.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Feb 27 

    · Course overview and assessments.

    · Background introduction to Prof Orth and students.

    · Form groups.

    · Task 1: Describe the product and company setting.

    · Each group will make a short presentation to the course illustrating their work and findings thus far respective to the first task they’ve completed. Prof Orth and the other groups' members will provide some verbal feedback to each group.

    · Task 2: Draft the outline of a concept for your brand.

    · Short group presentations on Task 2 and feedback.

    · Task 3: Synchronize product and brand.

    Feb 28

    · Task 4: Detail consumer-brand relationships.

    · Short group presentations on Task 4 and feedback.

    · Task 5: Describe brand positioning and target segments.

    · Short group presentations on Task 5 and feedback.

    Mar 5

    · Task 6: Detail brand communications. Design, conduct, and analyse experiment to evaluate alternative options.

    · Short group presentations on Task 6 and feedback.

    · Task 7: Set price(s).

    · Short group presentations on Task 7 and feedback.

    Mar 6

    · Task 8: Design a brandscape.

    · Short group presentations on Task 8 and feedback.

    · Task 9: Advanced Topics (multi-sensory branding, cross-cultural issues, creating emotional attachment).

    · Short group presentations on Task 9 and feedback.

    Mar 7

    · Task 10: Groups refine their brand concept by going repeatedly through tasks 1-9 and check for internal consistency.

    · Feedback on group experiences and achieving group objectives (presentation by each group – 5 or 6 minutes only)

    · Study and meeting times, group meeting with Lecturer.

    · Final day to meet with group members and Lecturer prior to completing report. Again this is NOT a ‘free day’ but should be used wisely to work together on the project and make good use of access to the Lecturer for advice and support.


  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment
    Value
    Due
    Peer Assessment 15% Mar 7, 2015
    Individual Critique 35% Mar 31, 2015
    Research Report 50% Mar 31, 2015
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Each assessment must be attempted, and an overall grade of at least 50% must be achieved to pass the course overall. Additionally, a poor peer review rating by fellow team members (lower than 5 out of 10 for all team related performance elements assessed) will result in a 5% reduction in a student’s overall grade.
    Assessment Detail

    1. Peer assessment (Individual Assessment) 15%

    Working in a group setting can, and usually is, challenging. This is true whether it is in a study or work context. However, the reality of life (especially our working life) is that we must just ‘get on with it’ and work productively with others to achieve common goals. Something that makes this easier is each person making a commitment to sharing work appropriately, allocate tasks according to strengths within the team and to making a strong effort to achieve success.
     
    There are 5 criteria that each of your team members will assess each other group in their team against on a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is poor performance and 10 is virtually ‘perfect’ performance, the criteria are explained below:

    Openness and flexibility
    Trust and cooperation
    Dutifulness
    Dependability
    Achievement of goals and tasks

    These elements will be explained in more detail in lectures and through provided readings, although students are encouraged to seek additional insights via personal investigations and discussions.


    Due March 7 2015 and submitted individually


    2. Individual Critique (Strength and Weaknesses assessment) 35%

    This aspect of the overall assessment carries almost as much weight as the group report that you are also required to complete. A major focus of this course is to encourage individuals to reflect on the process of developing a brand concept (and the reporting on that concept) and also to apply critical thinking to this process as well as their individual team experiences. This critique summarizes what a student believes are strengths and weaknesses of the brand concept developed by the group.


    Due March 31 2015


    3. Research report (Group Assessment) 50%


    Each group will be developing a concept for a brand of their choice. Topical details of the concept are described in the ten tasks outlined above. The final report will consist of a presentation (e.g. PowerPoint) detailing nine facets of a brand concept (counting at least 27 slides in total) and providing some clear strategies and recommendations respective to it so that stakeholders who have not been involved in the development process will be able to understand the concept and evaluate the likelihood for a successful implementation.

    At the first meeting on the 27th of February all students will be allocated to groups (including remote students) and will start drafting the concept by choosing a context (which can be wine but also related products).


    Due March 31 2015

    Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late. All assignments are to be submitted by the due date using the Turnitin facility on the course MyUni website. Assignments will be marked electronically and returned that way too. Please remember to keep a copy of all your work. Each assignment must also have an assignment cover sheet as its first page and title page after that.

    Late Assignment Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late.

    Return of Assignments
    Lecturers aim to marked and return assignments to student within two (2) weeks of the due date.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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