HLTH SC 3201 - Exercise, Movement & Cognition

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

This course aims to introduce students to the current theory and application of knowledge in the field of motor skill learning. A theoretical framework of the motor learning will be introduced as well as the neurological basis for performance and learning of movement tasks. This will provide students the basis for understanding how movement is initiated, learned and taught. Satisfactory completion of the course will see you develop an understanding of the principles required to provide effective instruction and feedback to optimise learning of motor skills in people with varied needs and skill levels in different sporting and clinical scenarios.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 3201
    Course Exercise, Movement & Cognition
    Coordinating Unit Medicine
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange
    Prerequisites HLTH SC 2102
    Assumed Knowledge PHYSIOL 3120
    Course Description This course aims to introduce students to the current theory and application of knowledge in the field of motor skill learning. A theoretical framework of the motor learning will be introduced as well as the neurological basis for performance and learning of movement tasks. This will provide students the basis for understanding how movement is initiated, learned and taught. Satisfactory completion of the course will see you develop an understanding of the principles required to provide effective instruction and feedback to optimise learning of motor skills in people with varied needs and skill levels in different sporting and clinical scenarios.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Simranjit Sidhu

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the cognitive/neurophysiological processes underlying performance and retention of movement skills in different every day, clinical and sporting situations
    2. Describe the major physiological changes and mechanisms that occur in perception, decision-making and movement execution
    3. Report how the practice environment and mode of feedback influence both skill acquisition and retention of movement
    4. Describe the major processes underlying the short and long-term retention of movement information
    5. Ability to evaluate posture and balance control
    6. Ability to use advanced concepts in resistance and functional exercise training to develop and report outcome of training for a clinical or sporting population aimed at improving postural control and movement performance
    7. Describe the changes in movement patterns and neural activity that accompany fatigue
    8. Describe the role of exercise in aging and information processing
    9. Demonstrate an ability to design new and/or modify existing ways to assess motor skills/learning in various exercise and/or clinical contexts
    10. Appreciate scientific methods and research process as it relates to movement learning
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    In Exercise, Movement and Cognition, there are no required textbooks.
    Recommended Resources
    Several texts will be helpful in guiding your understanding of the course material, and you will be directed to the relevant resources at the appropriate time. A sample of helpful resources is provided below:  
          
    1. Magill, R.A. 2011 (9th Edition) Motor Learning and Control: Concepts and Applications. McGraw-Hill
    2. Shumway-Cook, A. & Woollacott, M.H. (5th Edition) Motor Control: Translating Research Into Clinical Practice. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
    3. Ives, J.C. (2014) Motor Behaviour: connecting mind and body for optimal performance. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
    4. Schmidt, R. A., & Lee, T. D. (2011). Motor Control and Learning: A Behavioral Emphasis (5th ed.). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.
    References to various scientific journal articles will also be made. Understanding the science/research in relation to these articles is essential for a high score in the course. These journals are available online on the library website (e.g. pubmed) for university students.


    Online Learning
    Textual and audiovisual material will be provided online regularly through MyUni to assist with learning of topics covered in lectures as well as assessment preparation. The physical lectures will be recorded and placed on MyUni to support the face to face approach. Some lectures will be implemented entirely online using audio recordings and students are expected to view and go through the online lectures prior to the physical lecture timeslot which will be used as a “tutorial” platform to discuss and engage in activities related to lecture material (i.e. flipped classroom). As such, students are reminded to view MyUni often throughout the semester as it is assumed that information that is posted there will be read by all students. The flipped classroom sessions will not be recorded.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will be delivered via lectures and ‘tutorials’ styled with flipped classroom activities, practicals and small group discovery experience (SGDE) using a traditional face-to-face approach and online learning materials in the MyUni environment. Fortnightly practical and SGDE sessions will be held to provide students with an opportunity to translate concepts learnt in theory to practical/research contexts and to demonstrate their innovativeness. The students understanding of the material will be assessed using written assessments, online quizzes and reports. Students should use the learning objectives at the beginning of each lecture as study guide for all assessments in the course.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A full-time student should expect to spend, on average, a total of 48 hours per week on their studies.  This includes both the formal
    contact time required for the course (e.g. lectures, practicals and SGDE), as well as non-contact time (e.g. reading and revision).

    Exercise, Movement and Cognition is a 3-unit course.  As such, the expected workload will on average be 12 hours per week, including up to 4 contact hours per week.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Students will cover the following topics in a series of lectures by either face-to-face or via online approach (i.e. flipped classroom), practicals and SGDE (weekly schedule below). Please note that this schedule is used as a guide only and may be subject to changes at the discretion of the course coordinator. If any changes to the schedule are implemented, an announcement would be made on MyUni at least 7 days in advance of the event occurrence.

    Week Lectures/Tutorials (Monday) Practicals
    (Friday)
    Small Group Discovery (Tuesday)
    1 (25/07/16 – 29/07/16) Introduction to course profile & Learning Objectives
           
    Introduction to Motor Behaviour
     
    Internal Models in Motor Learning
    SGD 1:
    Introduction session on small group discovery
    experience
    2 (01/08/16 - 05/08/16) Understanding motor skills and measurement of motor performance

    Online Quiz 1 Due 05/08/16
    Prac 1:
     
    Measuring Reaction Time and Error
    3 (08/08/16 – 12/08/16) Pre-class Online
    Lecture: Performance Characteristics and Action Preparation
     
    Flipped Classroom
    Activities/Tutorial (In class summative ‘quiz’)
    Prac 1 Assignment Due 12/08/16 SGD 2:

    Students finalize topics and work on projects with team members and facilitators
    4 (15/08/16- 19/08/16) Attention and Memory

    Online Quiz 2 Due 19/08/16
    Prac 2:

    Information processing and dual-task challenges
    5 (22/08/16 – 26/08/16) Pre-class Online
    Lecture: Motor Skill Learning
     
    Flipped Classroom
    Activities/Tutorial (In class summative ‘quiz’)
    Prac 2 Assignment Due 26/08/16 SGD 3:
     
    Students discuss project proposal and
    experimental set up with facilitator
    6 (29/08/16 – 02/09/16) Exam Paper 1 (1 hour)
     
    Demonstrations and verbal instructions
    Prac 3:

    Performance Plateaus, Retention and transfer
    tests
    7 (05/09/16 - 09/09/16) Augmented feedback and
    structure of practice
     
    Online Quiz 3 Due 09/09/16
    Prac 3 Assignment Due 09/09/15 SGD 4:

    Students work on projects in their groups and in
    data collection phase – discuss issues/concepts with facilitator
    8 (12/09/16 – 16/09/16) Cellular Basis of
    Motor Learning

    Prac 4:
     
    Discovery
    learning, instruction and biofeedback
    19/09/16
    – 23/09/16
    MID SEM BREAK Prac
    4 Assignment Due 23/09/16
    26/09/16
    – 30/09/16
    MID SEM BREAK
    9 (03/10/16 – 07/10/16) NO PHYSICAL
    LECTURE (PUBLIC HOLIDAY ON 03/10)

    Online Lecture: Posture and Balance
    SGD 5:
     

    Students complete data collection, prepare for
    group presentation and edit/review their report
    10 (10/10/16 – 15/10/16) Pre-Class Online
    Lecture:  Functional Training
           
    Flipped Classroom
    Activities/Tutorial (In class summative ‘quiz’)

    Online Quiz 4 Due 14/10/16
    Prac 5:
     
    Balance Assessment
    11 (17/10/16 – 21/10/16) ONLINE LECTURE: Age
    differences in motor learning and performance


    Prac
    5 Assignment Due 21/10/16
    SGD 6:
     
    Student presentations/submissions (written
    report due 18/10/16 at 5pm)
    12 (24/10/16 – 28/10/16) Exercise and Cognitive
    Benefits: Older adults and Alzheimer’s Disease
     
    Online Quiz 5 Due 28/10/16
    Prac 6:
     
    Performance and transfer in mirror drawing task
    13 (31/10/16 – 04/11/16) Prac
    6 Assignment Due 04/11/16
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    There is a small-group discovery component in the Exercise, Cognition and Movement course. The SGDE component has a total weighting of 20% (15% for the individual report and 5% for the group presentation).

    SGDE for Exercise, Cognition and Movement is focused on demonstrating the translation of concepts learnt in theory to practical contexts.

    Each group will be randomly allocated a “skill” topic to demonstrate their practical abilities and innovativeness. Specifically, students will design new and/or modify existing ways to assess motor skills/learning in various exercise and/or clinical contexts.

    Throughout the project, students will work on an individual written report and a group power point presentation on the topic. Assessment rubrics will be used for grading all components of SGDE.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Details of each assessment task are shown below. In brief, the course contains 2 written exams covering all lecture/practical material, and a number of summative quizzes and practical mini assignments. Dates and explicit details for each assessment task will be given in advance via MyUni.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Marks for the different components of the course are assigned in the following proportions.

    Written Exams (40% of total mark)
    Mid - Semester Written Exam (15%)
    Final Written Exam (25%)

    Lecture Components – (22% of total mark)
    5 quizzes on MyUni (2% each)
    3 flipped classroom quizzes/activities (4% each - attendance is required to participate and attain the grade)

    Practical Components - (18% of total mark)
    6 Laboratory Reports (3% each -attendance in labs is required to attain the grade)

    Small Group Discovery Experience Component - (20% of total mark)
    See SGDE assessment rubrics for more details. Attendance in 4 out of 6 sessions is required to pass this component
    Assessment Detail
    The final marks for Exercise, Movement & Cognition may be moderated under some circumstances. Moderation is only ever used to improve a mark or grade, not to decrease it.

    Mid - Semester Written Exam

    Mid semester exam is designed to assess learning during the first half of the semester. The exam will assess understanding of
    principles and problem solving (both written and computational) capabilities. Questions will be based around lecture and practical material discussed throughout the semester.

    Final Written Exam

    Final written exam is designed to assess learning over the entire semester. The exam will assess understanding of principles and
    problem solving (both written and computational) capabilities. Questions will be based around lecture and practical material discussed throughout the semester.

    Lecture Components

    Students will complete 5 quizzes (multiple choice, fill in the blank and true/false questions) scattered throughout the semester that will be administered online via MyUni. The week during which a quiz is administered is clearly stated in the table of learning activities summary above. All quizzes will be due within a week from administration and the due date will be clearly stated when each quiz is made active on MyUni. This component will be used to reinforce key concepts from lectures for the written exams and will ensure students keep up with content throughout the semester.

    Three out of the total 12 weeks of lectures will be made up of flipped classrooms, whereby students will be required to view pre-class material (i.e. online lectures/recordings). The “lecture” slot will then be used to discuss concepts, example exam type questions and engage in group activities. There will be an in-class summative quiz (either individual/group) and attendance is compulsory in these sessions to attain a grade for the submitted answers.
     
    Practical Components

    Students will be required to answer a few questions related to the laboratory session that includes details of data collection, analysis and interpretation. Attendance is compulsory in the practical sessions in order to attain a grade for the submitted answers.

    Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) Component

    SGDE will be focused on demonstrating the translation of the concepts learnt in theory to practical contexts using innovativeness. Specifically, students will design new and/or modify existing ways to assess motor skills/learning in various exercise and/or clinical contexts and will be assessed on an individual written report and a powerpoint presentation. Further details will be provided in SGDE instructions.

    Hurdle Requirements and Course Criteria

    To successfully pass the course students must achieve all of the following criteria:

    - Achieving a final combined mark for the written exams of 50% or higher.

    - Complete assessment tasks, including online/in-class quizzes, practical mini assignments and small group discovery components to a passable standard

    Any student not meeting these barrier requirements will not be eligible to pass the course, regardless of performance in other
    components.
    Submission
    Submission of work for assessment

    Staff will clearly indicate the deadline (date and time) for coursework submission in the 'course announcements' section contained within MyUni. In addition, assessment deadlines will be announced via MyUni at least 7 days prior to the submission deadline. Unless otherwise indicated, coursework should be submitted electronically via MyUni. Any students experiencing technical difficulties should contact the course coordinator and MSTRC staff at the earliest opportunity. Coursework submitted to any location other than those specified will not be accepted. This includes submissions to personal staff email addresses.

    All responses to practical assessment questions and SGDE report will be submitted through “turnitin” to check for plagiarism (more details on plagiarism can be obtained from the link available under “policies & guidelines”). 

    There is a requirement for attendance in practical sessions in order for practical assessments to be graded and
    subsequently be awarded a mark. If you anticipate any absences under exceptional circumstances, please see the course coordinator within 5 days. Upon receipt of an explanation for absence from a practical session, staff may:

    - Refuse grade for assessment related to that practical class, specifying the appropriate reason(s); or

    - Grant permission for submission of assessment and attainment of grade without penalty

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks

    Submission dates may be extended under exceptional circumstances. Please see the course coordinator at the earliest opportunity if you feel that you require an extension. Upon receipt of an application for extension, staff may:

    - Refuse permission for
    extension, specifying the appropriate reason(s); or

    - Grant permission for
    extension without penalty; or

    - Grant permission for
    extension with a penalty as guided by this policy.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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