ASIA 2007 - Asia: Cultures & Identities

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

Asia is not only increasingly important economically, Asian culture is also more and more relevant around the world. Cultures and Identities will highlight the diversity of this culture, particularly in China and Japan as these are the most influential in both Asia the West. How did we get from Confucianism to cosplay and anime shaping Western pop culture? How did one result in the other? This course will both explain traditional forces like Confucianism and Shinto shaping culture and identity as well as explore how modernisation has helped bring about Lolitas in Japan and angry young men (fenqing) in China. This exploration will help us understand how tradition was reshaped by modernity and eventually today?s desire for ever higher levels of consumption. The course therefore covers traditional society and religion, the influence of imperialism and the modernisation imperative of the 19th century, the social consequences of the post-war economic miracle and the rise of communism as well as the influence of contemporary globalisation and the digital revolution.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ASIA 2007
    Course Asia: Cultures & Identities
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level 1 undergraduate study
    Incompatible ASIA 2020 & ASIA 2021
    Assumed Knowledge Adequate level of English writing and comprehension is assumed
    Course Description Asia is not only increasingly important economically, Asian culture is also more and more relevant around the world. Cultures and Identities will highlight the diversity of this culture, particularly in China and Japan as these are the most influential in both Asia the West. How did we get from Confucianism to cosplay and anime shaping Western pop culture? How did one result in the other? This course will both explain traditional forces like Confucianism and Shinto shaping culture and identity as well as explore how modernisation has helped bring about Lolitas in Japan and angry young men (fenqing) in China. This exploration will help us understand how tradition was reshaped by modernity and eventually today?s desire for ever higher levels of consumption. The course therefore covers traditional society and religion, the influence of imperialism and the modernisation imperative of the 19th century, the social consequences of the post-war economic miracle and the rise of communism as well as the influence of contemporary globalisation and the digital revolution.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Shoko Yoneyama

    Dr Shoko Yoneyama
    Dr Gerry Groot
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    No information currently available.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Students are expected to use Myuni and undertake out of class work as well as use the course reading materials provided.
    Recommended Resources
    Myuni, ICC and Turnitin will be used for assignment submission and marking.
    Online Learning
    MyUni will be used extensively.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures will include non-standard presentations such as films and guest appearances where possible, to allow students to engage with not only abstract ideas, but concrete examples and personalities embodying some the cultures and identities.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS
    1 x 1-hour lecture per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 2-hour workshop per week 24 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL = 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    1 Introduction
    2 Becoming Modern versus Becoming Western
    3 Japaneseness and Chineseness
    4 Nationalism and National Identity
    5 Ethnic and Minority Debates
    6 Gender Relations and Identities
    7 Consumption Cultures
    8 Popular Culture
    9 Youth and Young Adults
    10 The Elderly and the Disabled
    11 Religion and Spirituality
    12 Consultation

    *Learning activities are subject to change and will be confirmed at the beginning of the semester.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Intensive workthop activities centred on the experience of Asian students guided by senior academics.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTINGS COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
    Personal Identity Assessment Exercise Summative and Formative 10% 1, 3
    Participation & contribution to class activities Summative and Formative 20% 1-7
    Sub-culture website analysis and presentation Summative and Formative 20% 1, 2, 4, 5
    Research Essay Summative and Formative 50% 1-7


    Assessment Detail
    Personal Identity Assessment Exercise
    Students will be required to write a 500-1000 word self-assessment of their identity to help them relate theoretical and abstract concepts to their conceptions of themselves and discuss these in tutorials where appropriate - 10% weighting.

    Participation and contribution to Workshop Activities
    Students engage in interaction in class activities and the cooperative sharing of materials and information - 20% weighting.

    Sub-culture Website Analysis and Presentation
    Students will find websites reflecting contemporary subcultures to analyse their key themes and cultural drivers with findings to be shared in class - 20% weighting.

    Research Essay
    Students will bring together the insights gained in the course and integrate these with extensive research and theory - 50% weighting.

    *Assessment detail is subject to minor changes and to be confirmed at the beginning of the semester.
    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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