ENGL 3047 - Rhapsody & Revolution: Romanticism & Its Legacies

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2016

Romanticism has profoundly shaped modern sensibilities, informing our conceptions of individual subjectivity, our notions of the creative artist and the role of art, our understanding of the relation of the individual to the natural world, and our ideas of the fantastic and the uncanny. Arising as an ambivalent reaction to various intellectual strands of the Enlightenment, and a rebellion against classicism in the arts, the Romantic movement swept Europe in the wake of the French Revolution of 1789 and had momentous effects on all art forms: literature, music, dance, and the visual arts. In this course we will explore some major Romantic texts in relation to a set of key themes: revolution, liberty and gender; the role of art and the conception of the creative artist; the exaltation of the emotions, the senses and the imagination; the relation of the individual to nature; the uncanny and the fantastic; Bohemianism and alternative communities. Texts examined may include poetry, political writing and essays, novels, biographies, visual artworks, instrumental music, opera and ballet. Students completing this course will develop an enhanced understanding of key Romantic texts and ideas, as well as an appreciation of how Romantic ideologies and motifs underpin subsequent cultural movements such as the Gothic, Decadence, Surrealism and Modernism.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENGL 3047
    Course Rhapsody & Revolution: Romanticism & Its Legacies
    Coordinating Unit English and Creative Writing
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level 2 undergraduate study
    Incompatible ENGL 2102
    Course Description Romanticism has profoundly shaped modern sensibilities, informing our conceptions of individual subjectivity, our notions of the creative artist and the role of art, our understanding of the relation of the individual to the natural world, and our ideas of the fantastic and the uncanny. Arising as an ambivalent reaction to various intellectual strands of the Enlightenment, and a rebellion against classicism in the arts, the Romantic movement swept Europe in the wake of the French Revolution of 1789 and had momentous effects on all art forms: literature, music, dance, and the visual arts. In this course we will explore some major Romantic texts in relation to a set of key themes: revolution, liberty and gender; the role of art and the conception of the creative artist; the exaltation of the emotions, the senses and the imagination; the relation of the individual to nature; the uncanny and the fantastic; Bohemianism and alternative communities. Texts examined may include poetry, political writing and essays, novels, biographies, visual artworks, instrumental music, opera and ballet. Students completing this course will develop an enhanced understanding of key Romantic texts and ideas, as well as an appreciation of how Romantic ideologies and motifs underpin subsequent cultural movements such as the Gothic, Decadence, Surrealism and Modernism.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Maggie Tonkin

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate a broad knowledge of British Romanticism.
    2. Critically examine each text's engagement with its historical, political and cultural context.
    3. Demonstrate their analytical and critical skills through the contextualized discussion of a range of texts, and through close reading and  critical analysis of selected Romantic texts.
    4. Prepare well informed and well written assignments tasks informed by rigorous research.
    5. Confidently give oral presentations, and participate in productive and respectful discussion with their peers.
    6. Critically examine post-Romantic cultural traditions and contemporary cultural forms in the light of their newly acquired knowledge of Romantic ideologies and motifs.
    7. Use technologies relevant to the preparation and completion of assessment tasks.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Wu, Duncan. Romanticism: an Anthology. (4th edition) Wiley Blackweel, 2012. Also available as an ebook.
    Austen, Jane. Persuasion.
    Bronte, Emily. Wuthering Heights.
    Recommended Resources
    To be provided.
    Online Learning
    This course make full use of MyUni. All lectures will be recorded and posted on MyUni. Select secondary sources and additional core material will also be made available on MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course will involve the equivalent of 156 hours per semester.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Learning activities will include lectures, face-to-face seminars, use of MyUni, instructor-directed and student-directed research and assessment-for-learning tasks.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    SGDE will be developed through student-led discussions and through collaborative seminar tasks.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment may include an oral presentation, a close reading, a researched essay and a take home examination.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    All assessment tasks must be attempted/completed in order to successfully complete the course.
    Assessment Detail
    To be announced in the Course Profile.
    Submission
    For submission requirements please refer to the English & Creative Writing Department Handbook.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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