EDUC 1100 - Introduction to Teaching and Learning

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2022

This course provides opportunities for students to understand the notion of teaching as a standards-based profession. Students will gain an initial understanding of curriculum theory with an emphasis on the Australian curriculum the SACE and the International Baccalaureate. Students will have opportunities to develop effective teaching and learning strategies. The topic demonstrates a variety of instructional approaches for students' learning and is designed to engage for student learning and is designed to engage students with the processes involved in planning, implementing and evaluating teaching and learning programs. A major focus of the course allows students to gain a broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages, drawing on historical and philosophical knowledge, including learning a rudimentary knowledge of the Kaurna language. For students studying the Bachelor of Teaching, it is a graduation requirement that they demonstrate they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population. All Bachelor of Teaching (Middle) and Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) students participate in the School of Education's eLearning Program that requires students to own an iPad with pencil and keyboard. The University of Adelaide will assist students with procurement upon enrolment.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EDUC 1100
    Course Introduction to Teaching and Learning
    Coordinating Unit School of Education
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Incompatible EDUC 1002
    Restrictions Available to students in the following programs only: BTMBA or BTMBB or BTMM or BTMBM or BTMBS or BTSBA or BTSBE or BTSM or BTSBM or BTSBS or BTBA or BTBSC or BTBMC or BTBEC
    Course Description This course provides opportunities for students to understand the notion of teaching as a standards-based profession. Students will gain an initial understanding of curriculum theory with an emphasis on the Australian curriculum the SACE and the International Baccalaureate. Students will have opportunities to develop effective teaching and learning strategies. The topic demonstrates a variety of instructional approaches for students' learning and is designed to engage for student learning and is designed to engage students with the processes involved in planning, implementing and evaluating teaching and learning programs. A major focus of the course allows students to gain a broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages, drawing on historical and philosophical knowledge, including learning a rudimentary knowledge of the Kaurna language. For students studying the Bachelor of Teaching, it is a graduation requirement that they demonstrate they have met the required levels of personal literacy and numeracy broadly equivalent to the top 30% of the population. All Bachelor of Teaching (Middle) and Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) students participate in the School of Education's eLearning Program that requires students to own an iPad with pencil and keyboard. The University of Adelaide will assist students with procurement upon enrolment.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Nina Maadad

    Dr Nina Maadad
    School of Education
    The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005
    Level 8, Room 8.33
    Nexus Building
    Ph : +61 8 8313 3711
    Fax : +61 8 8313 3604
    Email : nina.maadad@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    APST (Graduate)
    1  Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of teaching as a standards based profession. 2.1, 6.1
    2  Identify and plan for effective teaching for student learning. 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.2, 4.5
    3 Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of the relevant curriculum frameworks and pedagogical approaches in Australia schooling. 2.3, 2.6
    4 Demonstrate broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages, drawing on historical and philosophical knowledge, including learning a rudimentary knowledge of the Kaurna language. 1.4, 2.4
    5 Demonstrate a variety of instructional approaches for student learning that provide achievable challenges for students of varying abilities and characteristics. 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 3.1
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1-5

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    1-5

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    2, 4, 5

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    1

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    4, 5

    Attribute 6: Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural competency

    Graduates have an understanding of, and respect for, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, culture and knowledge.

    4

    Attribute 7: Digital capabilities

    Graduates are well prepared for living, learning and working in a digital society.

    1-5

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    1-5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Whitton, D. et al. (2021). Teaching: Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary. Cengage Learning Australia (1st Edition): South Melbourne, Victoria.
    Recommended Resources

    Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. (2019). Marsh's Becoming a Teacher (7th Ed.), Pearson Education Australia: Frenchs Forest, NSW.
    Online Learning
    Lectures and all other materials used in the course will be available on MyUni over the semester. The course will also include announcements, discussion boards, reading materials, external web-links and lecture recordings.

     Mr Les Hankin’s Essay and Referencing Template:

    Reproduced with kind permission is Dr Anthony Potts and Mr Les Hankin’s Essay and Referencing Template™. You may profit
    from reacquainting yourselves with it prior to and during your essay and
    assignment work.

    _______________________________________________________________________

    These points have emerged from marking essays.

    Please note: You will be expected to have taken account of these points when you write your essay.

    1.      Plan the shape and structure of the assignment and indicate this in the introduction: “In this assignment …” Then stick to
    your plan and use subheadings to keep you there.

    2.      It is perfectly acceptable to include your opinions but only after you have considered all the evidence you can muster from respectable and authoritative sources. Keep all your opinions to the conclusion at the end.

    3.      Think of themarker. Use headers and footers for your name and page number.

    4.      Recommended layout: Arial 12 pt, with 2 lines spacing. This is the academic standard. You don’t ever need to use italics or underlining or bold. Keep bold for headings only.

    5.      Subheadings are very useful for organising your ideas.

    6.      If you must use quotations, they must flow from the text, not disrupt it.

    7.      Address the question! Also, you must use the full word allowance or close to it. (Check in pull-down menu: File/ Properties).

    8.      Never ever have one-sentence paragraphs. Paragraphs are for building ideas. Use paragraphs. They are a great invention. They organise the prose and ease the eye.

    9.      Stick to the Harvard referencing system and never use numbered footnotes.

    10.   You need to demonstrate that your work is informed by current academic thinking. Websites don’t convey this, but rather the opposite.

    11.   URLs on their own are not acceptable. Never cite any website that doesn’t have .ac or .gov in them. There is no way of proving the veracity of what they say.

    12.   Spelling! Where/ were; there/ their! It’s = it is! Apostrophes are important!

    13.   Grammar: if in any doubt, use a full stop and start a new sentence. A sentence must have a verb.

    14.   Have someone proofread your submission, aloud, to check its grammar works.

    15.   Accuracy in names is important.

    16.   Use the spelling / grammar check on Word (Press F7 key at the top.)

    17.   Avoid words like ‘amazing’. You need to be academic and objective.

    Referencing is a very important aspect of your work and is not tutors being fussy. It demonstrates your academic reading and
    commitment:

    18.   When citing sources (Oxfam 2004) make sure this is carried through and included in the reference list at the end. A reference
    list is essential and must follow on immediately in the same file. Do not separate them or leave a gap in your essay.

    19.   A set of references that is only drawn from the Net is not acceptable. It comes over as laziness. Be adventurous: use the Library.

    20.   Look at how references are laid out in the set books to get it right, but the following table explains all eventualities.

     




     
    In the main body In the Reference List/ Bibliography
    One author Penn (2005) - if paraphrasing.
    Penn (2005:99) – if a direct quote.
    Penn, H. (2005) Understanding Early Childhood.
    Maidenhead: Open University Press.


    Two authors
    Also
    note the position of (2nd edn)
    This is the 2nd edition of
    this book.
    Blenkin and Kelly (1996) – if
    paraphrasing.

    Blenkin
    and Kelly (1996:15) – if a direct quote.
    Blenkin, G.M. & Kelly, A.V. (1996) Early
    Childhood Education (2nd edn).
    London: Paul Chapman.
    More than two authors Gopnik et al. (1999) or
    Gopnik
    et al. (1999:21) - if direct quote.
    Gopnik, A., Meltzoff, A. and Kuhl, P. (1999) How
    Young Babies Think. London:
    Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
    A chapter from an edited book
    Mukherji (2005) or
    Mukherji
    (2005:145) – if direct quote.
    Mukherji, P. (2005) ‘The importance of health’,
    in Dryden, L., Forbes, R., Mukherji, P. & Pound, L. (2005) Essential
    Early Years. London:
    Hodder Arnold.
    A quote about another author within the text – a secondary citation.
    David (cited in Bruce, 2005) or
    David (cited in Bruce, 2005:17) - if direct quote


    Bruce, T. (2005) Early Childhood
    Education. (3rd edn). London: Hodder Arnold.

    (i.e.David will not appear in the Reference List/Bibliography because you have not
    read David’s original work; you have read about it in Bruce’s book)
    Newspaper article
    Furedi (2004) or
    Furedi
    (2004:15) – if direct quote
    Furedi, F. (2004) ‘Plagiarism stems from the
    loss of scholarly ideals’, Times Higher Education Supplement. 6 August, p.16
    Online newspaper article
    Furedi (2004) or
    Furedi
    (2004:15) – if direct quote
    Furedi, F. (2004) ‘Plagiarism stems from the
    loss of scholarly ideals’, Times Higher Education Supplement. p.16. http://thes.co.uk. (accessed 12 February 2005)
    Journal article Dryden et al. (2003) Dryden, L., Hyder, T. & Jethwa, S. (2003)
    ‘Assessing individual oral presentations’, in Investigations in University Teaching and Learning, vol. 1, no. 1, pp.79-83.
    Electronic Journal
    Kwon (2002)

    Kwon, Y.I. (2002) ‘Changing Curriculum for Early Childhood Education in England’, in Early Childhood Research & Practice, vol. 4, no. 2. http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/ (accessed 30 June 2006)
    Website with author Stainthorp (2003) Stainthorp, R. (2003) ‘Use it or lose it’.
    http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/Pubs/stainthorp.html
    (accessed 6 October 2004)
    Website without author but linked to a
    recognisable organisation
    Froebel Foundation (2005)  Froebel
    Foundation (2005) ‘Three Education Principles’ Education Principles.
    http://www.froebel.com/ (accessed 29 July 2005).
          

    This chart is adapted from: Dryden, L., Forbes, R., Mukherji, P. & Pound, L. (2005) Essential Early Years. London: Hodder Arnold.







  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The lectures will be delivered fully online, while the tutorials will be delivered in both modes face to face for local students and online for students who are not currenltly in Adelaide.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Workload Total Hours
    1 x 1 hour lectures per week 12 hours per semester
    1 x 1 hour tutorial per week 12 hours per semester
    6 hours placement per week 60 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours reading per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week  24 hours per semester
    Total = 156 hours per semester


    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Lecture Topic Learning Outcomes APST (Graduate)
    1 Introduction to Teaching as a profession
    • What is teaching?
    • The concept of a profession
    • The Australian Professional Standards for Teachers.
    1, 3, 4 6.1
    2 The role of curriculum (a)
    • An introduction to curriculum theory
    • The role of curriculum
    • Know the content - The Australian Curriculum
    1, 3, 5 2.1
    3 The role of curriculum (b)
    • Deciding what is taught and how to teach it
    • Know the content - SACE, IB and other relevant approved curriculums and assessments.
    1, 3, 4, 5 2.3
    4 Cultural Diversity
    • Teaching students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.
    • Strategies for responding to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.
    1, 6, 7 2.4
    5 The education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and developing an understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages
    • The impact of culture, cultural identity and linguistic background on the education of students from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds.
    • Demonstrate broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages.
    4, 5 1.4, 2.4
    6 Planning for and implementing effective teaching.
    • What is a lesson plan?
    • Planning what and for whom?
    • Organising a cohesive series of learning opportunities within a lesson.
    4, 5 1.3, 3.4, 3.7, 7.2
    7 Planning for and implementing effective teaching.
    • Setting learning goals that provide achievable challenges for students of varying abilities and characteristics.
    • Resources, including ICT resources for expanding curriculum learning opportunities for all students.
    • Using ICT safely and responsibly.
    4, 5 2.2, 3.1, 4.2, 4.5
    8 Planning for and implementing effective teaching.
    • Implementing the plan for effective teaching
    • What is effective teaching?
    • How do we know?
    1, 3, 5, 7 3.2, 3.3, 3.6, 4.2
    9 Creating a supportive, creative and engaging classroom
    • Create & maintain supportive & creative learning environment.
    • An introduction to various verbal and non-verbal communication strategies to support student engagement.
    4, 5 3.5, 4.2, 4.3,
    10 An introduction to assessment, feedback, and reporting
    • Some assessment strategies, including informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and summative approaches to assess student learning.
    • How to provide feedback & report on student learning.
    4, 5 5.1, 5.2, 5.5
    11 The community, colleagues, parents and carers
    • Engaging professionally with colleagues & parent and carers.
    • Exploring a broad range of strategies for involving parents and carers in the educative process.
    4, 5 7.2, 7.3
    12 Re-visiting Teaching as a profession
    • The concept and practice of professional learning referenced to research and standards based evaluation.
    • Preparing for 1st placement.
    4, 5  6.1
    Specific Course Requirements

    Attendance and participation in lectures (online and face to face) and tutorials is compulsory. All students are expected to complete the School placement (10 days), Working with Children Check (WWCC) and Mandatory Notification Training (MNT) Certificate. These requirements are all compulsory and are required prior to undertaking the placement in schools and attendance at lectures and tutorials.

    Students are expected to pass professional experience in order to pass EDUC 1100. Therefore, satisfactory completion of Professional Experience (10 days in school) is an assessable hurdle requirement for this course. Placement completion is determined by School Mentor Teachers in collaboration with the School of Education. If you do not satisfactorily complete the Professional Experience component of the course, you will be awarded a Fail grade for the course. Where there are Medical, Compassionate or Extenuating circumstances as defined in the Modified Arrangements for Coursework Assessment (MACA) Policy, you may apply for an Assessment Extension in the form of an additional Professional Experience placement. Upon approval, the School of Education will endeavour to provide an additional Professional Experience at a time to be negotiated with a school. Where the additional Professional Experience occurs after relevant grading deadlines, a Result Pending grade will be assigned. The additional Professional Experience must be completed prior to the date that a Result Pending grade is automatically converted to a Fail grade as outlined in Policy.

    Hurdle Requirements Information:

    1- Attempted the placement - (complete the full ten days and receive a positive satisfactory report fro the mentor teacher in the school).

    2- For students who attempted the placement but were not successful, they will receive a Result Pending (RP) and an opportunity to re-sit the placement. If they pass the re-sit placement they will receive the original mark and will pass the course.
     
    3- If however the students did not attempt the placement, they would receive a Fail and have to re-sit the course even if they passed the course other requirements.


    Special Consideration:

    Students who wish to seek special consideration because of illness or special circumstances should apply to the lecturer in charge with relevant documentary evidence. This is usually a doctor’s certificate.

    Extensions and deadlines:

    If due to illness or other valid reasons, a student is unable to meet a deadline, he/she must contact the lecturer before the deadline in order to seek an extension (which may or may not be granted). Students are required to produce original documents to support their application for an extension.

    Any assignment handed in late, without authorised extension, will be penalised at a rate of 10% of the assigned mark per 24-hour period late, to a maximum of 7 periods.

    Assignments handed in more than seven periods late, without authorised extension, will not be marked and an automatic fail grade for that piece of assessment will be recorded.

    Plagiarism:

    Plagiarism is “the reproducing of someone else's intellectual work and representing it as one's own without proper acknowledgment”. Examples of plagiarism include: direct copying or paraphrasing of someone else’s words without acknowledging the source; using facts, information and ideas directly derived from an unacknowledged source; and producing assignments which are the work of other people.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome APST (Graduate)
    Assessment Task 1: Planning and Implementing a Lesson Summative

    TBA

    40% 2, 3, 4 2.2, 2.4, 2.6, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 4.2
    Assessment Task 2: Analysis of a Teaching Situation Summative TBA
    30%
    1, 5 1.3, 2.2.
    Assessment Task 3: Unit plan Summative TBA 30% 1, 6 3.5, 3.7, 7.3, 7.4
    School Placement Active Observation TBA Hurdle 3, 4 6.3, 7.2
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Course requirements:
    Tutorials:

    Attendance and participation in lectures (online or face to face) and tutorials is compulsory.  Each week there are tutorials in which we will discuss the topic and the reading listed for that week. All students are required to read the relevant chapter and reading materials allocated for that week. It is not meant to be another lecture. The success of the tutorials depends on everyone participation and group discussion. All participatns are expected to take part and complete the question / answer part to fulfill the course requirements.

    Analysis of a Teaching Situation:

    It is very important to start planning from day one your topic and to start collecting materials for the writing. The weeks tend to go quickly and before we know it we are running out of time. The writing must meet normal academic and scholarly requirements and will be 1000 words (maximum) in length. Please note that this also includes quotations but not references.  All sources and materials used must be referred to in the paper itself and not simply appear in the bibliography or reference list.  

    Placement 

    It is vital that you are able to apply educational theory and research to your teaching. Therefore, satisfactory completion of Professional Experience (10 days in school) is an assessable hurdle requirement for this course. Placement completion is determined by School Mentor Teachers in collaboration with the School of Education.

    If you do not satisfactorily complete the Professional Experience component of the course, you will be awarded a Fail grade for the course.

    Where there are Medical, Compassionate or Extenuating circumstances as defined in the Modified Arrangements for Coursework Assessment (MACA) Policy, you may apply for an Assessment Extension in the form of an additional Professional Experience placement. Upon approval, the School of Education will endeavour to provide an additional Professional Experience at a time to be negotiated with a school.

    Where the additional Professional Experience occurs after relevant grading deadlines, a Result Pending grade will be assigned. The additional Professional Experience must be completed prior to the date that a Result Pending grade is automatically converted to a Fail grade as outlined in Policy.
    Assessment Detail
    Details for assessment:

    Assessment Task 1: Planning and Implementing a Lesson

    Group Demonstration Lesson:

    Plan, develop and teach a lesson relevant to a topic from one of your key teaching learning areas or as negotiated with the tutorer in class. Planning for and implementation of the lesson will include the following:

    - Clear Aims and Objectives for the lesson to ensure it meets student learning outcomes.
    - Options and strategies of teaching to cater for all students in the classroom.
    - Explicit, well organised classroom activities.
    - Clear instructions and questioning.
    - At least one resource needs to be identified as relevant for catering to students from diverse cultural backgrounds and specific resource particularly for students of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background, and incorporate the resource into your lesson plan with an explanation why this resource was chosen.
    - A reflection on how well you incorporated broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages within the learning area.
    - iPad applications within the lesson resources and utilize the iPad to implement the lesson.
    - ICT resources for expanding curriculum learning opportunities for all students.
    - The lesson will be delivered in your tutorial class . It should last 25 minutes allowing an extra 5 minutes for question and answer.


    Assessment Task 2: Analysis of a Teaching Situation

    Pre-Service Teachers (PSTs) need to create an analysis in a form of a presentation, using Keynote on their iPads, of 6 slides that summarises good practice teaching. This may be through discussing strategies observed while on placement, and/or by accessing other available scenarios provided in the course resources (APSTs, 1.3 & 2.2,). The analysis/ presentation must cover:

    A description or definition of good practice teaching (drawn from the available course resources).
    A reflection on the strategies that are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds within the presentation.
    A critique that explains why these strategies are effective by reference to recent research literature.

    Assessment Task 3: Creating a Unit Plan

    For this task, you need to develop a unit plan consisting of three lesson plans. You need to plan, structure and develop the lesson plans throughout the course (full information is available and will be accessed on MyUni)

    School Placement:

    There will be a 10-day Professional Experience Placement at a school. This is a hurdle and if not complete successfully you will fail the course.
    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.