HIST 3039 - Human Trafficking: Atlantic Trade to Contemporary

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

Human trafficking is an enduring element of world history. This course will introduce students to the underside of globalization, to the process through which human beings are turned into commodities and bought and sold on the international market. 'Modernity' in the course is seen both through the eyes of the slavers as well as through the eyes of the enslaved, and the combined effect for students will be a dark journey to the depths of the world economy. The course begins with an in-depth assessment of the Atlantic trade and the rise of Europe. But rather than consider this history as safely confined to the past, the second half of the course considers the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in which enslavement changes form, but not function. The ubiquity of enslavement will lead us to many places: Europe, Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, Africa, Australia and Asia. The readings will include prize winning histories of enslavement and investigative journalism which reveals the contemporary situation. Abolitionism will be a focus as well, from its rise in the nineteenth century to its current resurgence. The inspiring strategies that enslaved people undertook to survive their bondage will be a feature throughout and are a testament to the human spirit. The major piece of assessment is a primary research paper that will allow students to discover new dimensions of this hidden history.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3039
    Course Human Trafficking: Atlantic Trade to Contemporary
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Incompatible HIST 2072
    Course Description Human trafficking is an enduring element of world history. This course will introduce students to the underside of globalization, to the process through which human beings are turned into commodities and bought and sold on the international market. 'Modernity' in the course is seen both through the eyes of the slavers as well as through the eyes of the enslaved, and the combined effect for students will be a dark journey to the depths of the world economy. The course begins with an in-depth assessment of the Atlantic trade and the rise of Europe. But rather than consider this history as safely confined to the past, the second half of the course considers the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in which enslavement changes form, but not function. The ubiquity of enslavement will lead us to many places: Europe, Latin America, North America, the Caribbean, Africa, Australia and Asia. The readings will include prize winning histories of enslavement and investigative journalism which reveals the contemporary situation. Abolitionism will be a focus as well, from its rise in the nineteenth century to its current resurgence. The inspiring strategies that enslaved people undertook to survive their bondage will be a feature throughout and are a testament to the human spirit. The major piece of assessment is a primary research paper that will allow students to discover new dimensions of this hidden history.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Tom Buchanan

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1) Understanding key factual elements in the history of global enslavement.

    2) Ability to produce evidence-based arguments in research on global slavery.

    3) Ability to work in a group in order to facilitate research outcomes related to global enslavement.

    4) Proficiency in research technologies that facilitate research in global enslavement.

    5) An awareness of the ethical, social and cultural implications of historical inquiry—as pertains to enslavement--within a global context.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3, 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Marcus Rediker, The Slave Ship: A Human History (2008, or reprint ed)


    Kevin Bales and Ron Soodalter, The Slave Next
    Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today (Second Edition)


    The following research database will also be used in this course:

    http://www.slavevoyages.org/
    Recommended Resources
    To Be Announced
    Online Learning
    This course will make use of a range of canvas tools to facilitate learning.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course has one two-hour large group session and one one hour tutorial per week.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will need to devote approximately 12 hours per week to this course (divided over 12 weeks of study). This consists of 1 x
    2-hour lectures and one tutorial per week, and 9 hours per week of independent study, during which time students will prepare for tutorials and work on assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Week 1 Learning about Atlantic Slavery

    Week 2 Learning about Atlantic Slavery, Designing Research Questions

    Week 3 Learning about Atlantic Slavery, Designing Research Questions

    Week 4 Learning about Atlantic Slavery, Researching

    Week 5 Learning about Atlantic Slavery, Researching

    Week 6 Learning about Atlantic Slavery, Writing Paper

    Week 7 Learning about Twentieth Century Slavery, Writing Paper

    Week 8 Learning about Twentieth Century Slavery, Completing Paper

    Week 9 Learning about Contemporary Slavery, Researching

    Week 10 Learning about Contemporary Slavery, Researching

    Week 11 Learning about Contemporary Slavery, Presenting Research

    Week 12 Leanring about Contemporary Slavery, Presenting Research
    Specific Course Requirements
    None
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    During week 2 we will have a Small Group Discovery Experience that investigates the Slave Trade database, a research tool which contains information about 36,000 voyages involving human trafficking in the Atlantic World over five centuries. We will do this in groups during lecture and the assigned activities will help prepare students to develop individual research projects in the course.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Quizzes Summative

    Week 4, 11

    15% each 1, 2, 6
    Research Plan Summative Week 3 10% 3, 4
    Research Paper Summative
    Week 8

    40%

    3, 4, 6

    Group Presentation

    Summative

    Weeks 11, 12
    20%
    5, 6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    There are no special requirements. The course will follow normal faculty policies regarding late assessments.
    Assessment Detail
    Detail on the specific assignments will be provided via the course guide.
    Submission
    Quizzes are to be taken in canvas. All papers are to be turned in electronically through canvas.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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