MUSPMACT 3100 - Contemporary Music in Practice 3

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

As the capstone course for the Popular Music and Creative Technologies program, this course develops advanced creative and technical skills in composition and song writing, music production and public presentation of original creative work. The opportunities offered by current technologies and trends will be explored in order to prepare students for professional careers in the music industry, and focus on the development of skills that enable them to adapt to the dynamic nature of the industry into the future. A particular focus of this course is on the production of a show reel, enabling students to develop skills in putting the final polish on work for publication, and promoting themselves and their creative work in a professional context. Students will also explore strategies for exploiting various web-based media (both traditional, and web 2.0) in order to promote their work, and research new avenues for music production, dissemination and distribution outside traditional models. They will apply their knowledge and skills practically through the production of an e-Portfolio - incorporating a web identity and presence for their creative work and a portfolio of compositions - and be responsible for the planning, organisation and presentation of a 20-minute public recital of their creative work.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MUSPMACT 3100
    Course Contemporary Music in Practice 3
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 7 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites MUSPMACT 3201
    Incompatible MUSPMACT 3111, MUSPMACT 3112
    Restrictions Available to Bachelor of Music students only
    Course Description As the capstone course for the Popular Music and Creative Technologies program, this course develops advanced creative and technical skills in composition and song writing, music production and public presentation of original creative work. The opportunities offered by current technologies and trends will be explored in order to prepare students for professional careers in the music industry, and focus on the development of skills that enable them to adapt to the dynamic nature of the industry into the future.
    A particular focus of this course is on the production of a show reel, enabling students to develop skills in putting the final polish on work for publication, and promoting themselves and their creative work in a professional context. Students will also explore strategies for exploiting various web-based media (both traditional, and web 2.0) in order to promote their work, and research new avenues for music production, dissemination and distribution outside traditional models. They will apply their knowledge and skills practically through the production of an e-Portfolio - incorporating a web identity and presence for their creative work and a portfolio of compositions - and be responsible for the planning, organisation and presentation of a 20-minute public recital of their creative work.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Luke Harrald

    Dr Luke Harrald
    email: luke.harrald@adelaide.edu.au

    Ms Ronnie Taheny
    email: veronica.taheny@adelaide.edu.au

    Dr Peter Dowdall
    email: peter.dowdall@adelaide.edu.au












    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1 Demonstrate critical interpretations of music scholarship as relevant to both the theoretical and practical aspects of music and music-making
    2 Understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of creative projects and appropriately employ composition, digital media, and performance in a combination of formats to document outcomes
    3 Have confidence in the communications of research outcomes and creative work, whether delivered through oral, written, performance or other media, employing appropriate professional standards
    4 Understand the key theoretical and practical issues in the contemporary music industry and apply them more broadly in professional life
    5 Project management skills - including identifying overall goals and milestones, creating a plan, and management of personnel and schedules
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2, 3, 4, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 2, 3, 4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    2, 3, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    • Class handouts and materials placed on MyUni.
    • Each week students will be required to bring their instruments, or other technology they require to realise their group work.

    Headphones and personal file storage such as a portable hard drive or USB flash drive for use in the EMU Audio Lab. Students will have access outside class time to rehearsal spaces to prepare for their recitals.
    Recommended Resources
    Reading

    Anon. Australasian music industry directory, 33rd ed. Newtown, N.S.W.: Immedia, 2001.

    Anon. The rock pages : a guide for young musicians on how to get started in the S.A. music industry –and keep going. North Adelaide : Carclew Youth Arts Centre, c1995.

    Beall, Eric (2009) The Billboard Guide to Writing and Producing Songs that Sell. Billboard Books: Crown Publishing Group, New York.

    Fink, Michael. Inside the music industry : creativity, process, and business. New York: Schirmer Books, 1996.

    Blume, Jason (1999) Six Steps to Songwriting Success. Billboard Books: Crown Publishing Group, New York.

    Braheny, John (2006) The Craft and Business of Songwriting. Writer’s Digest Books, F+W Publications, Cincinnati.

    Goldberg, Justin. The ultimate survival guide to the new music industry : handbook for hell. Los Angeles: Lone Eagle Pub., c2004.

    Hannan, Michael. The Australian guide to careers in music. Sydney : University of New South Wales, 2003.

    Holloway, Rowena. Making music : a continuous case study of marketing in the music industry. Frenchs Forest N.S.W. : Pearson Education, 2003.

    Krasilovsky, M. William and Sidney Shemel. This business of music, 7th ed. New York : Billboard Books, c1995.

    Latham, Christopher. Survival of the fittest : the artist versus the corporate world. Strawberry Hills, N.S.W. : Currency House, 2004.

    Schulenberg, Richard. Legal aspects of the music industry : an insider’s view. New York : Billboard Books, 1999.

    Webb, Jimmy (1998) Tunesmith – inside the art of songwriting. Hyperion, New York. 
    Online Learning
    MyUni will be used to provide specialist seminar materials and assignments available during the semester. It will also be used for announcements and online submission of assessments.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    • Class handouts and materials placed on MyUni.

    • Each week students will be required to bring their instruments, or other technology they require to realise their group work.

    Headphones and personal file storage such as a portable hard drive or USB flash drive for use in the EMU Audio Lab. Students will have access outside class time to rehearsal spaces to prepare for their recitals.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS
    1 x 2 hour seminar per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 2 hour workshop per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 3 hour forum per week 36 hour per semester
    12 hours research & creative practice per week 144 hours per semester
    7 hours individual and / or group rehearsal per week 84 hours per semester
    TOTAL = 312 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Seminars and workshops in this course will use a flexible format, in response to student progress and learning.  Topics may cover multiple weeks.

    SEMINAR TOPICS
    Advanced songwriting techniques, including form, instrumentation, texture, harmony and lyrics
    Advanced production techniques and creative use of production
    Works lists and show reels
    The new music industry – crowd funding, digital distribution, building audiences / connection with fans via digital platforms
    WORKSHOP TOPICS
    Development of artist identity, persona
    EPKs, Media Releases and Marketing
    Independent artists as small businesses, Music Publishing
    Web Design, ePortfolio creation, digital presence
    Social Media, Digital Distribution Platforms
    HTML, Media Formats, Codecs
    FORUM
    A series of small and large group forums to enable students to prepare for their Recital.

    Topics covered in small groups may include: creating a project proposal and plan, rehearsal strategies, promotion and marketing, stage-management dependant on student needs.

    Students will perform at least once for the large group prior to the recital, and receive peer and lecturer feedback.
    Specific Course Requirements
    EMU Facilities

    This course will involve using the resources of the Electronic Music Unit (EMU). This includes facilities such as studios, recording spaces and digital audio workstations.

    Access and use of EMU is based upon the following:

    Users must complete and pass the EMU Guide Assessment (EGA). In order to pass the EGA users must receive a 90% or above grade. Users will have a maximum of 3 attempts at passing the EGA before being prohibited from taking the assessment further. If a user fails to pass the EGA after 3 attempts, or doesn’t pass by the end of week 4 of the course, they will not be permitted to continue the course and won’t be provided access or permission to use any of the EMU facilities.

    Sound Levels & Hearing Protection

    This course may require using spaces where a dB meter has been installed. If you exceed the set dB limit for the space, the lights will flash. Students found exceeding these levels will have their booking privileges revoked for two weeks, and repeat offenders may have their booking privileges revoked for the remainder of the academic year. In order to minimise risk in noise-prone situations, the Conservatorium makes both reusable gel ear-plugs and disposable foam ear-plugs available to students and staff free of charge at all times. Students and staff are also urged to consider purchase of customised personal hearing protection. For more information regarding sound levels, hearing and hearing loss please refer o the full content of the O'Brien Report available here: http://music.adelaide.edu.au/hsw/documents/
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Through this course, students will compose original creative work. In small groups, students will prepare their original compositions for live performance. Through this process, students will learn collaborative and research skills, enhance and further develop their creative process, and disseminate their new work publicly through live performance. Students will meet with mentors four times across the semester in small groups of 5, in order to work through the organization of, and prepare for their Recitals.

    A variety of performance venues are used semester-to-semester, including on-site venues such as UniBar and Scott Theatre, and off-site venues such as The Wheatsheaf Hotel, The Promethean, Jive, and The Jade Monkey.

    Students will also undertake small group work in the preparation of their e-Portfolios, researching current trends in artist promotion including websites, social media and other digital distribution platforms.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
    e-Portfolio Formative and Summative 50% 1, 2, 3, 4
    Forum Participation & Reflective Journal Formative and Summative 20% 3, 4, 5
    Recital Summative 30% 2, 3, 5
    Assessment Related Requirements
    As per Conservatorium policy, active and positive participation in 100% of classes is expected, any student who attends less than 100% of required classes without approved leave may result in a 5 (five) mark penalty for each unapproved absence. The penalties will be applied to the final total percentage mark for the year for the relevant component i.e. after all other assessments have been completed and calculated. Arrival after the scheduled starting time or departure before the scheduled finishing time may, at the lecturer or Co-ordinator’s discretion, be regarded as an unapproved absence.
    Assessment Detail
    e-Portfolio (50%) - The e-Portfolio will give students the opportunity to research new modes of musical dissemination through online media, and apply this research practically through building up a web presence for their creative work, incorporating both traditional, and web 2.0 elements. The e-Portfolio provides a platform for the presentation of the student’s creative work in a professional context, and will incorporate a Bio, Electronic Press Kit, Press Releases for the student’s performances, and Artist statement on the impetus behind their creative work. The e-Portfolio will also incorporate three new compositions that are open as far as musical style, genre and instrumentation are concerned, enabling students to continue the development of their individual compositional voice / style that they have been working on cumulatively since the beginning of the program; and may also incorporate previous work that supports the image developed through mentorship during the workshop.

    Forum Participation & Reflective Journal (20%) – Students will perform at least once during the forum, and take part in peer assessments each week (either as performers or peers). Through the Reflective Journal, students will document, consider critically, and reflect on the development and rehearsal phase of the Recital. At the beginning of the semester, students will develop a project proposal and plan, which will also form part of the submission. Students will also evaluate following their recital the success of the event, and how well they achieved what they set out to do in the original plan.

    Recital (30%) - Students will be assessed on their contribution and participation in preparation for and delivery of a 20 minute public recital of their work. Central to this assessment is the role they play in the organisation and development of their work – particularly their leadership role in their ensemble - in preparation for the recital, and the quality of their individual performance and effectiveness of their group overall in the presentation of their creative work. They will also be assessed on their contribution to the organisation of the overall event on the evening of the recital, of which their individual recital will form approximately 1/5th.
    Submission
    All written materials will either be submitted in-class as hard copy, or online via MyUni. The distinction between types of submission will be made clear in the 'Assignments' section of MyUni.

    Performances will take place both in-class, and as part of a Graduation Recital.

    Note that due to scheduling and practicalities, extensions for performance assessments are not possible.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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