MUSGEN 2001 - From Elvis to YouTube

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

A survey of popular music of the Rock era. This course considers the stylistic, socio-cultural, economic, and technological aspects of popular music. Regarding style, greatest attention is given to the evolution of popular genres from the 1950s through the 1990s, including Rhythm and Blues, Rock and Roll, Folk Rock, Country, The Beatles/British Invasion, Motown and Soul, Progressive Rock, Metal, Funk, Disco, Punk, Rap/Hip-Hop, Grunge, Alternative, Electronic Dance Music, Avant-Garde Rock and Mainstream Pop. The first part of the course looks at the pre-cursors of Rock-era music including Anglo-American Folk and early Blues. The latter part of the course considers popular music in the first two decades of the 21st century, with emphasis on the institutionalisation of Rock music in contemporary society, and the role of digital technology in the transformation of both the creation and consumption of popular music.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MUSGEN 2001
    Course From Elvis to YouTube
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible GENMUS 1001, GENMUS 2030, MUSPMACT 2612, MUSST 1000A
    Assumed Knowledge Ability to play an instrument or read music is not required for this course
    Course Description A survey of popular music of the Rock era. This course considers the stylistic, socio-cultural, economic, and technological aspects of popular music. Regarding style, greatest attention is given to the evolution of popular genres from the 1950s through the 1990s, including Rhythm and Blues, Rock and Roll, Folk Rock, Country, The Beatles/British Invasion, Motown and Soul, Progressive Rock, Metal, Funk, Disco, Punk, Rap/Hip-Hop, Grunge, Alternative, Electronic Dance Music, Avant-Garde Rock and Mainstream Pop. The first part of the course looks at the pre-cursors of Rock-era music including Anglo-American Folk and early Blues. The latter part of the course considers popular music in the first two decades of the 21st century, with emphasis on the institutionalisation of Rock music in contemporary society, and the role of digital technology in the transformation of both the creation and consumption of popular music.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Steven Knopoff

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Understand and appreciate the historical, socio-cultural, and music-stylistic trends of English language popular music of the rock era, as well as of selected earlier popular forms which contributed to the development of music of the Rock era
    2. Recognise the aural, textual and visual components of a substantial representative number of styles and specific songs of this period
    3. Demonstrate aural awareness and critical listening skills through assigned- and in-class listening
    4. Understand the intrinsically linked cultural, technological, and economic underpinnings of popular music
    5. Demonstrate music research skills and confidence in written communication
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 3, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 3, 4, 5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Required Textbook available for purchase from UniBooks:
    Covach, John and Andrew Flory. 2012. What's That Sound: An Introduction to Rock and Its History. New York: W. W. Norton.

    Additional Required Resources:
    *Required Listening: Approximately 80 songs comprise the required listening for this course. These are available as streaming (downloadable) audio in the MyUni course and as .mp3 files available for loan at the Elder Music Library
    *Several info sheets containing information not in the textbook and a select number of lecture slides will be available in the MyUni course
    *Basic Elements of Popular Music': a list of basic music-technical terms/definitions that all students should learn will be available in the MyUni course
    Recommended Resources
    A wealth of relevant material including journals, reference materials, and online sound and video resources, are available via the University Library's Music Database page: http://libguides.adelaide.edu.au/music/databases
    Online Learning
    MyUni will be used to provide details of lecture and seminar content, set readings, and assignment instructions, as well as for assignment submission and announcements
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures will cover and explore the range of topics as set out in the Course Outline. Spoken word delivery will be supported by a large number of A/V exhibits.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    In addition to the 3 contact hours per week, it is anticipated that students would spend 6-8 hours per week in reviewing lecture notes, preparing the assigned readings and assigned listening, undertaking suggested readings and listening, revising for exams, and researching and writing the course essay.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The following schedule is indicative of the topics in this course. Some topics and ordering of topics may vary.

    WEEK 1

    Introduction to the Course; Introduction to Musical Terms; 'Four Themes' for Studying Rock Era Popular Music
    The World Before Rock 'n' Roll (19th c. - 1920s)
    WEEK 2
    The World Before Rock 'n' Roll (1920s-1950s)
    WEEK 3
    Rock 'n' Roll (mid-late 1950s)
    The Early Sixties: The Demise of Rock-'n'-Roll and the Promise of Soul (Girl Groups, Dance Music, and the Rise of the Pop/Rock Producer)
    WEEK 4
    Folk Music Revivalists; The Beach Boys and the Beatles in the early Sixties; Beatlemania and the 'British Invasion'
    American responses to the 'British Invasion'
    WEEK 5
    Folk Rock in the mid-1960s; Dylan, the Beatles and ‘Serious’ Pop Song Lyrics of the mid-Sixties
    WEEK 6
    Motown Pop and Southern Soul Music in the 1960s
    California Counter-Culture and the Evolution of Psychedelic Rock in the 1960s
    WEEK 7
    British Psychedelic Rock; Rock Festivals; Blues-Rock
    Singer-Songwriters; Progressive Country and the Development of Country-Rock in the late Sixties/early Seventies; The Growing influence of Rock Music on the Popular Mainstream in the 1970s
    WEEK 8
    British Heavy Metal, Progressive Rock, and Glam in the early Seventies
    Black Pop, Reggae, Funk and Disco in the Seventies
    WEEK 9
    Punk and New Wave in the late 1970s; Indie Bands and Post-Punk Legacy of the 1980s
    1980s Digital Technology, MTV, and the Popular Mainstream
    WEEK 10
    Rap and Hip Hop in the 1970s-80s and beyond; Grunge, Metal and other Alternative Styles in the 1980s
    Alternative Styles of the 1990s
    WEEK 11
    Pop (not Rock) in the 1960s-70s; The Avant-Garde in Rock and Pop 1960s-80s
    1980s Electronica and later trends in electronic dance and pop
    WEEK 12
    Popular Music in the Early 21st Century: Trends in Technology, Commerce, and Consumption
    Course summary
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
    Exam 1 Formative and Summative 20% 1, 2, 3, 4
    1000 word brief position paper Formative and Summative 15% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Exam 2 Summative 35% 1, 2, 3, 4
    1500 word essay Summative 30% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Assessment Detail
    Exam #1, 45 mins in duration, will assess material from the lectures, assigned readings and assigned listening as presented during the first 5 weeks of the course.

    Students will complete an 800-1000 word brief position paper in which the present an argument in favour of one of a dozen or more provided statements concerning popular music.

    Exam #2, 75 mins in duration, will mostly assess material from the lectures, assigned readings and assigned listening as presented during the final 7 weeks of the course. A small portion of questions will require recall of material from the first part of the course.

    Students will research and write a 1500 word essay which addresses one of three given topics and which involves comparing the work of two artists/groups of the student's choosing.
    Submission
    Written assignments should be submitted electronically as .pdf via MyUni, by 5:00 p.m. on the due date.

    Late assignment policy:
    Late written assignments will be accepted to a maximum of 7 days late with a late penalty of 2 marks per calendar day applied.

    Extensions without penalty may be granted when supporting documentation can be provided and then, and only then, by arrangement with the course lecturer prior to the due date and time. Extensions will not be granted under any other circumstance. To apply for an extension, use the medical/compassionate application form available at:
    https://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/forms/medical-compassionate-application-form.pdf
    The completed form should be submitted to the Elder Conservatorium Office, either in person at the Music Office front desk (Schulz Building Level 9, access via western Schulz lifts) or via email:
    music@adelaide.edu.au

    Students will receive feedback on their assessment tasks.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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