MUSGEN 3005 - Village Voices - Greenwich Village in the 1960s

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

This course explores one of the most culturally fertile and vibrant eras of recent times (the 1960s) by focussing on a location (Greenwich Village, New York) that was a hub of artistic experimentation and collaboration, against a background of social change and political turmoil. The course will explore the emergence of new art forms - both 'high art' and popular - and the dynamic interactions between artists in different disciplines, with a particular focus on music. The ability to read music or play an instrument is not required for this course. Topics include: The Avant Garde: John Cage, Morton Feldman, Edgard Varese, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, Judson Dance Theatre; Poetry in Action: political activism in the work of Bob Dylan, Allen Ginsberg and The New York School; Less is More: minimalism in the arts and music: Phil Glass, Steve Reich, La Monte; Young, Phil Niblock, Sol LeWitt, Jasper Johns, Robert Morris, Donald Judd; Happenings, Fluxus and Conceptual Art: Allan Kaprow, George Maciunas, George Brecht, Philip Corner, Jonas Mekas, Harry Smith, Underground Cinema; Pop Art and Art Rock: Andy Warhol, The Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, The Fugs; Jazz at the Village Vanguard: Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor and Free Jazz.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MUSGEN 3005
    Course Village Voices - Greenwich Village in the 1960s
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible GENMUS 3011
    Course Description This course explores one of the most culturally fertile and vibrant eras of recent times (the 1960s) by focussing on a location (Greenwich Village, New York) that was a hub of artistic experimentation and collaboration, against a background of social change and political turmoil. The course will explore the emergence of new art forms - both 'high art' and popular - and the dynamic interactions between artists in different disciplines, with a particular focus on music. The ability to read music or play an instrument is not required for this course. Topics include: The Avant Garde: John Cage, Morton Feldman, Edgard Varese, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg, Judson Dance Theatre; Poetry in Action: political activism in the work of Bob Dylan, Allen Ginsberg and The New York School; Less is More: minimalism in the arts and music: Phil Glass, Steve Reich, La Monte; Young, Phil Niblock, Sol LeWitt, Jasper Johns, Robert Morris, Donald Judd; Happenings, Fluxus and Conceptual Art: Allan Kaprow, George Maciunas, George Brecht, Philip Corner, Jonas Mekas, Harry Smith, Underground Cinema; Pop Art and Art Rock: Andy Warhol, The Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, The Fugs; Jazz at the Village Vanguard: Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor and Free Jazz.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Stephen Whittington

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes


    The objectives of this course are to develop:

    1 understanding of the political, social, and artistic context in which experimental and radical art forms developed in Greenwich Village during the 1960s.

    2        Understanding of the relationship between different art forms and the progressive dissolving of boundaries between them.

    3        Ability to analyse critically  texts and art forms, and the cultural context in which they are created.

    4       Ability to think creatively and apply to the creation of art forms.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,4
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Online Learning
    Extensive readings and weblinks are available online for this course.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is taught through a 3-hour seminar.
    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary


    Topics

    The Historical Background: Greenwich Village Bohemia 1850-1940 ; The political climate of the sixties and the making of the counterculture – the battles for civil rights, for personal freedom, for feminism and gay rights, against the Vietnam War, against censorship.

    The Old Avant-Garde
    – The Forties and Fifties: Abstract Expressionism, the Beats, the birth of Underground Cinema. Harry Smith, Maya Deren, John Cage, Morton Feldman, Edgard Varèse, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg.

    The Folk Music Revival: Politics and Folk Music - Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, the folk club scene, Sing Out!, the Newport Folk Festivals


    Less is More: minimalism in the arts and music –La Monte Young, Phil Glass, Steve Reich, Phil Niblock, Sol LeWitt, Jasper Johns, Robert Morris, Donald Judd.

    Free Jazz: Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Albert Ayler, Sun Ra, and the policital climate in which it developed.


    Underground Cinema – Harry Smith, Stan Brakhage, Jack Smith, Ron Rice, Ken Jacobs, Kenneth Anger, Jonas Mekas

    Happenings, Fluxus and Conceptual Art – Allan Kaprow, George Maciunas, George Brecht, Philip Corner, Jonas Mekas, Harry Smith, la Monte Young, Henry Flynt, Yoko Ono

    Poetry in Action: the mimeograph revolution and the work of Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, Joe
    Brainard, Piero Heliczer, Ed Sanders and the Fugs.                


    Pop Art and Art Rock – Andy Warhol,,The Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, The Fugs

     

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary


    a.       Critical analysis (1500 words)                                          40%                       Learning Objectives: 1,2

    b.       Creative/research project class presentation                  10%                       Learning Objectives: 3,4

    c.       Creative/research project final submission                       50%                       Learning Objectives: 3,4

    Assessment Detail


    1.     A critical analysis of a significant work of literature, poetry, music, visual art, performance art or other art form, relevant to this course. It is recommended that this critical analysis focus on an in-depth study of a single work (e.g. a poem by Ted Berrigan, a song by Bob Dylan, a film by Ken Jacobs), rather than a superficial analysis of a larger work (e.g. an entire album by Bob Dylan, a
    poetry collection by John Ashbery). An exception might be made when a series of works is closely related (e.g. painting of soup cans by Andy Warhol.) (1500 words).
     

    2.   A creative project (e.g. musical work, film, poetry, interdisciplinary art, visual art, conceptual art) on a relevant theme, accompanied by an exegesis of c. 1500 words; the details of the project are to be negotiated with the course co-ordinator. The exegesis must contain a description of the sources of inspiration for the work, frame of reference, structural or formal considerations, and methodology.

     

          OR: A research project in an area relevant to this course: Essay: 3500 words.

     

    All student creative and research projects must be presented in class in Weeks 11-
    12. The work may be presented in a draft or incomplete form at this stage.

     

     

    Submission
    All work is submitted online, unless by prior arrangement. Alternative forms of submission are possible where file size or the nature of the project require it.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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