ENTREP 5016OL - Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Online - Quadmester 2 - 2016

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise and entrepreneurship and introduces the role of the entrepreneur, innovation and technology in the entrepreneurial process. It is not about small business or life style businesses but instead the development of growth oriented businesses - whether for-profit or not-for-profit. Entrepreneurship is both a way of thinking and of doing. It involves "building something from nothing" and successful entrepreneurs know how to manage and mitigate uncertainty and risk. The course content is relevant to those individuals thinking about starting a business or who are already in business - large or small, those who are interested in commercialising their own innovations or of others, and those who advise entrepreneurs or engage in policy making in the entrepreneurship area.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENTREP 5016OL
    Course Entrepreneurship and Innovation
    Coordinating Unit Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation & Innov Centre
    Term Quadmester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s Online
    Units 3
    Contact approx 4 hours per week over 10 weeks (interaction and preparation)
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise and entrepreneurship and introduces the role of the entrepreneur, innovation and technology in the entrepreneurial process. It is not about small business or life style businesses but instead the development of growth oriented businesses - whether for-profit or not-for-profit. Entrepreneurship is both a way of thinking and of doing. It involves "building something from nothing" and successful entrepreneurs know how to manage and mitigate uncertainty and risk. The course content is relevant to those individuals thinking about starting a business or who are already in business - large or small, those who are interested in commercialising their own innovations or of others, and those who advise entrepreneurs or engage in policy making in the entrepreneurship area.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Allan O'Connor



    Teaching Staff:

    Term 2 Online
    Name: Dr Anton Jordaan

    Short Bio:
    Anton Jordaan was originally trained as an accountant and tax specialist.  Five years after founding an accounting and tax consultancy, he sold his shares to his partners and set out to establish, grow and harvest a number of business ventures in the education and training space. In subsequent years, one of his businesses was acquired by a stock exchange listed company; and a few years later his business was involved in an IPO. Following the IPO he served as a director of this newly listed company for 2 years.
    In addition to the strategic leadership and financial roles over the years, Anton has maintained an interest in education and training, and has 20 years teaching experience in tertiary, vocational and corporate education environments. He has delivered entrepreneurship and project management programs in Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, Hong Kong, USA, UK, Netherlands, South Africa, Oman, Qatar, Russia, Canada and Australia.

    After attaining a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Accounting, he completed an Honours degree in Accounting, a Master of Commerce degree in Business Management, a MBA degree with an Entrepreneurship focus, and a Master of Advanced Business Practice degree. He completed a PhD in Entrepreneurship at The University of Adelaide and is a member of CPA Australia.

    Email: anton.jordaan@adelaide.edu.au

    Term 3 Online
    Name: Julie Logan

    Bio:
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Monday 11th April to Sunday 19th June 2016
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    An action learning approach is adopted whereby students “learn through doing” through analysis of relevant cases and through interactive and traditional exercises that relate to lecture topics. On completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1 Develop a plan for implementing entrepreneurial activities in a globalised and competitive environment being responsible for the social, ethical and culture issues.
    2 Identify the attitudes, values, characteristics, behaviour, and processes associated with successful entrepreneurial behaviour.
    3 Understand what is meant by entrepreneurship and innovation from both a theoretical and practical perspective.
    4 Involve in a continuing learning process through the interaction with peers in related topics, as individuals and as team members.
    5 Describe the ways in which entrepreneurs perceive opportunity, manage risk, and organise resources and add value.
    6 Acquire a wide range of source materials that facilitate the continuing learning process in the future.
    7 Recognise the role of the entrepreneur in the new enterprise creation process.
    8 Critique a plan for implementing entrepreneurial activities in a globalised and competitive environment being responsible for the social, ethical and culture issues.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    2, 3, 5, 6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 8
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    5, 7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 8
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text book:
    Timmons, Jeffry A., Gillin, L. M., Burshtein, S., and Spinelli, Stephen Jr. (2011). New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century – A Pacific Rim Perspective, 1st Edition. McGraw-Hill Irwin.

    Two Case Study readings will be provided to enable you to produce the analysis, contribution and participation in the discussion forum in weeks 3, and 7:
    1. Roxanne Quimby Case Study (pp. 119-125)
    2. Mike Bellobuono Case Study (pp. 412-421)

    Case studies from:
    Timmons, Jeffry A. and Spinelli, Stephen Jr. (2009). New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century, 8th edition. McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston.

    Additional readings to produce your Critical Analysis research Paper will be made available through the LEARN site:

    1. Amabile, Teresa M. (1997) Motivating Creativity in organisations: On doing what you love and loving what you do. California Management Review, 40 (1) 39-58.

    2. Birkinshaw, Julian. (2003) The Paradox of Corporate Entrepreneurship. Strategy and Business, 30, pp 46-58

    3. Getz, I. and Robinson, Alan G. (2003) Innovate or Die: Is that a Fact? Creativity and Innovation Management, 12 (3) 130-136.

    4. Nohria, N. and Gulati, R. (1996) Is Slack Good or Bad for Innovation? Academy of Management Journal, 39 (5) 1245-1264.

    5. Costanzo, Laura A. (2004) Strategic Foresight in a high-speed environment. Futures 36 (2) 219-235.

    6. Wilson, Keeley and Doz, Yves L. (2011) Agile Innovation: A Footprint Balancing Distance and Immersion. California Management Review, 53 (2) 6-26.

    7. Lichtentaler, Ulrich.(2011) Open Innovation: Past Research, Current Debates, and Future Directions. Academy of Management Perspectives, 25 (1) 75-93.
    Recommended Resources
    There is a wide range of material available on the course topics including the following:
    Bessant, J. (2003) High Involvement Innovation: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage Through Continuous Change. Chicester: John Wiley & Sons.
    Drucker, P. (1999) Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
    Fagerberg, J, Mowery, DC and Nelson, RR (2005) The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford University Press, NY.
    Hisrich, R.D., Peters, M.P., and Shepherd, D. (2008) Entrepreneurship, McGraw-Hill Irwin, Boston.
    Moore, Geoffrey, (1999) Crossing the Chasm, Harper & Collins.
    Porter, ME, Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance, Free Press, New York, NY, 1985

    Journals
    There is a range of journals where entrepreneurship research scholars publish their research, such as:
    · Journal of Business Venturing
    · Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice
    · Journal of Small Business Management
    · Academy of Management Review
    · Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship
    · Venture Capital
    · Small Business Economics

    Web links
    The following links may provide interesting or useful information in relation to creativity, the various aspects of the entrepreneurial process, venture formation, etc.
    www.brainstorming.co.uk
    www.mind-mapping.co.uk  
    www.entrepreneur.com
    www.youngentrepreneurs.net.au
    www.openideo.com
    www.inc.com
    www.business.gov.au
    www.ausindustry.gov.au
    Online Learning

    LEARN is the University of Adelaide’s platform for dedicated online delivery. LEARN is a customised version of Moodle, and houses all course requirements including the course profile, announcements, additional course materials (beyond the prescribed text), assessment items, discussion forums, grading, feedback, links to various university and course resources, an internal website email system, a technical assistance facility, etc. LEARN is only accessible once the URL and a password have been provided to the student on enrolment. Students are given access to the course prior to the start date to familiarise themselves with the operational aspects and functionality of the website. 

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is offered in online mode.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a guide, a 3 unit course comprises a total of 156 hours.
    Learning Activities Summary
    This is a draft schedule and session dates are a guide only. The timetable may be changed during the course delivery if necessary.
    Week Content Readings Activities
    1  Introduction to entrepreneurship The entrepreneurial process

    Chapters 1 & 3

    Online Lesson content 

     · Provide a bio/LEARN student profile for the Introductory assignment

    · View the video clip/s to provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    . Take the self-assessment quiz to gauge pre-existing entrepreneurial knowledge/terminology
    2  The entrepreneurial mind Ethical decision making and the entrepreneur  Chapters 2 & 10

    Online Lesson content
     · View the video clip/s to provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    . Entrepreneurial Ethics Application Exercise
    3  The opportunity
    Screening venture opportunities
    Sustainability
     Chapters 8

    Online Lesson content
     · Roxanne Quimby Case Study - provide an answer to the discussion question/s and comment on your classmates’ responses

    . Timmons Model Application Exercise
    4 The business plan Chapters 4, 5 & 6

    Online Lesson content
     · Lean Startup vs Business Plan Case Study - view the video clips provided, compile an initial submission to the discussion question/s then comment on your classmates’ submissions and responses
    5  Entrepreneurial leader and the team
    Leading rapid growth, crises and recovery The family as entrepreneur
     Chapters 9, 17 & 18

    Online Lesson content
     Activity:
    Provide an answer to the discussion question/s and comment on your classmates’ responses

    Assignment:
    The Entrepreneur Interview due (25%)
    6  Resource requirements Franchising  Chapters 11 & 12

    Online Lesson content
     Activity:
    Provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    Assignment: Critical Analysis Research Paper (15%)
    7 Entrepreneurial finance Chapter 13

    Online Lesson content
     · Mike Bellobuono Case Study - provide an answer to the discussion question/s and comment on your classmates’ responses
    8  Obtaining venture and growth capital Obtaining debt capital Chapters 14 & 16

    Online Lesson content
     · Provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    . Crowd Funding Application Exercise
    9  The deal: valuation, structure and negotiation The harvest and beyond Chapters 15 & 19
    Online Lesson content
     Activity:
    Provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    Assignment: Reflective Essay (12.5%)
    10 Social entrepreneurship Chapter 7

    Online Lesson content
    Activity:
    View the video clip/s to provide your initial contribution to and participation commentary in the discussion forum

    Assignment: Business Plan Critique due (25%)
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    An overview of the course assessment appears in the following Table. Details appear in the following section:
    Assessment No.Form of Assessment/Collaborative TaskLength (in word count)WeightingDue DateLearning outcome covered
    1  Application Activities (3) 500 9% Day 7 of weeks 2, 7, & 8 1, 3, 4, 5, 7
    2 Discussion Forum Participation (10) 300-500 words 15% Days 3-7 of weeks 1-10 1, 3-7
    3 Entrepreneur Interview 1500-2500 words 25% Day 7 of week 4 1-5
    4 Critical Analysis Research Paper Maximum 1500 words 15% Day 7 of Wk 6 2, 6,7
    5 Reflective Essay Maximum 1500 words 11% Day 7 of Wk 9 1,5,6
    6 Business Plan Critique
    Maximum 2500 words
    25% Day 7 of week 10 1-5,7
    Total 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students must complete all course assessment requirements.

    Course results are subject to moderation by the ECIC Board of Examiners
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment 1: Application Activities (3)
    Weighting: 9%
    Due Dates: Day 7 of weeks 2, 7 & 8
    Submission Details: Via Drop Box in LEARN

    Task:
    Complete a response to the assignment prompts contained in the course page. The assignment asks you to apply concepts learned in the week to various situations, problems, or work-related deliverables.

    Scope:
    This exercise will assess your knowledge, understanding and application of the relevant material covered.

    Length and Presentation:
    500 words

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated critical thinking, including applications in practice
    · Demonstrated complete understanding of the assignment and the underlying concepts
    · Met the minimum substantive expectations
    · Demonstrated an appropriate writing style and language choice
    · Use of additional research, appropriately cited, to support the argument will produce a higher grade

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 3, 4, 5, 7
     
     
    Assessment 2: Discussion Forum Participation
    Weighting: 15%
    Due Dates: Days 3-7 of weeks 1-10
    Submission Details: Via discussion prompts on the forum in LEARN

    Task:
    Respond to the discussion prompts and questions each week by the due dates outlined in the assignment. You should expect to post an initial response on day 3 and then follow up responses and inputs to the posts of your classmates and faculty during days 4-7

    Scope:
    This exercise will assess your knowledge, understanding and application of the relevant material covered.

    Length and Presentation:
    The object is quality, rather than quantity in demonstrating your understanding of the concepts and ability to apply them. The initial analysis /response to the assigned discussion prompts must be posted by the due date (day 3). It is expected you will read all discussion postings, and then post 3 - 4 follow-up responses to your classmates’ postings by end of week.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated critical thinking, including applications in practice
    · Demonstrated complete understanding of the assignment and the underlying concepts
    · Met the minimum substantive expectations
    · Posted the required subsequent responses to the posts of your classmates or to the responses to your initial post – responses are substantive in nature (at least 100 words) and should include constructive feedback and meaningful inputs or extension to the discussion
    · Demonstrated good-quality writing, concise language choice and appropriate citations where relevant

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
     

    Assessment 3: Entrepreneur Interview
    Weighting: 25%
    Due Dates: Day 7 of week 4
    Submission Details: Via Drop Box in LEARN

    Task:
    Refer to the “Visit with an Entrepreneur” Exercise 1 on pp. 29-31 of the prescribed text. Using this as the basis for your assignment, identify a suitable entrepreneur who has been in business for at least three years. The better learning experience comes from a business that is growth oriented and exhibits innovation in its products or services, systems, processes, etc.

    Prepare and conduct an interview with the selected entrepreneur using the questions from Exercise 1 as a suggested guide.. Preparation is crucial if you are to derive maximum benefit from this assessment. Reflect on the responses obtained during the interview, then write up your report (using Step 4 of Exercise 1 as a basis for your discussion).
    The correct approach is to produce an insightful evaluation of what you learned through this exercise and how theory may differ to the reality of the entrepreneur’s experiences.
    The incorrect approach would be to merely produce a massaged reproduction of the interview.
     
    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the topic and the correct application of theories, concepts and frameworks and, if appropriate, the effective use of local and international research data to support your analysis and discussion.
     
    Length and Presentation:
    Maximum 2500 words
    In Word document format
    Must include a Assessment Cover Sheet

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated a well-defined and sound perspective with obvious understanding
    · Demonstrated critical thinking and synthesis through a solid argument, opinion, or application of concept/s
    · Additional research sources, appropriately cited, other than those assigned, and examples are specific, detailed and directly support the argument
    · Demonstrated quality and depth of analysis and insight, with reasonable and objective interpretation
    · Distinguishes between fact and fiction, explores reliability, and compares and contrasts

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
     
     
    Assessment 4: Critical Analysis Research Paper
    Weighting: 15%
    Due Dates: Day 7 of week 6
    Submission Details: Via Drop Box in LEARN

    Task:
    Readings available through the LEARN site:
    1. Amabile, Teresa M. (1997) Motivating Creativity in organisations: On doing what you love and loving what you do. California Management Review, 40 (1) 39-58.
    2. Birkinshaw, Julian. (2003) The Paradox of Corporate Entrepreneurship. Strategy and Business, 30, pp 46-58
    3. Getz, I. and Robinson, Alan G. (2003) Innovate or Die: Is that a Fact? Creativity and Innovation Management, 12 (3) 130-136.
    4. Nohria, N. and Gulati, R. (1996) Is Slack Good or Bad for Innovation? Academy of Management Journal, 39 (5) 1245-1264.
    5. Costanzo, Laura A. (2004) Strategic Foresight in a high-speed environment. Futures 36 (2) 219-235.
    6. Wilson, Keeley and Doz, Yves L. (2011) Agile Innovation: A Footprint Balancing Distance and Immersion. California Management Review, 53 (2) 6-26.
    7. Lichtentaler, Ulrich.(2011) Open Innovation: Past Research, Current Debates, and Future Directions. Academy of Management Perspectives, 25 (1) 75-93.

    These readings provide some knowledge and understanding of the Innovation topic. Your task is to critically analyse two or more of the academic papers listed above. A critical analysis is not merely a description of what you have read. It requires an evaluation of the paper/s, critiquing one against the other, comparing issues discussed and conclusions drawn, emphasizing themes which may emerge, the strengths and weaknesses of the articles, etc. A critical analysis is not an essay describing and agreeing with what the paper proposes, it is an expression of your beliefs, opinions and standpoint of your argument. It is a discussion and interpretation of your evaluation of the reading/s, being explicit in your reasons and providing evidence that influenced you in forming your judgement. Provision of evidence to substantiate your argument is crucial. Reference the material used to validate how and why you arrived at your conclusion/s. Reading wider than the articles provided will deepen your argument and corroborate any opinions stated. The purpose of a critical analysis is to evaluate the worth, truth, validity, utility, quality and merit of the argument postulated by the author/s.

    The points below give some ideas on how to extract sufficient information from the journal articles to develop a critical analysis. If you have a robust, focused argument to convey, you may not address all issues.
    · Briefly describe the the intention of or argument behind the paper/s – a couple of sentences is sufficient.
    · Comment on the research method/s used. Do you deem the method to be appropriate? Is it quantitative or qualitative, or a mix? Were surveys used? What does the literature actually reveal?
    · Evaluate the papers. What is the main line of argument? Is the evidence well presented, sufficient and convincing to support the main line of argument? Make a judgement on the value of the paper/argument.
    · Is the paper directed at a specialized or general audience? Assess the purpose of the writer/s. Is it to build theory, to inform, to describe a specific business issue, or to influence the reader through emotion or logical reasoning?
    · Is there dissension between the different authors? Which viewpoint do you agree with, and why? Are there alternative lines of argument? Why?
    · What are the findings? Are they strong, weak and/or “sound”? In your opinion, were there any omissions, limitations, or provision of contrary evidence?
    · Did the author/s achieve their purpose accurately, coherently and clearly?
    · What is the relevance to business and management practice?
    · How, why and where does innovation fit within entrepreneurship?
    · What conclusions did YOU reach? Provide evidence for your line of reasoning.
    · What have you achieved or contributed in completing this analysis?

    Note: This is not a précis of the papers analysed. What is sought is insight, critical thinking and integration of ideas to produce a paper that reflects what you derive from this exercise, your deductions, your perceptions, etc.

    Scope:
    This exercise will assess your knowledge and understanding of innovation theory, concepts, and the implications to practical management issues. The assignment also assesses your understanding of the role of critical analysis in practical business situations. It will do this by directing you to reflect on business issues, how opinions differ and how these viewpoints need to be evaluated if sense is to be made of the ambiguity in business.

    Length and Presentation:
    Maximum 1500 words
    In Word document format
    Must include a Assessment Cover Sheet

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated a well-defined and sound perspective with obvious understanding
    · Demonstrated critical thinking and synthesis through a solid argument, opinion, or application of concept/s
    · Additional research sources, appropriately cited, other than those assigned, and examples are specific, detailed and directly support the argument
    · Demonstrated quality and depth of analysis and insight, with reasonable and objective interpretation
    · Distinguishes between fact and fiction, explores reliability, and compares and contrasts

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 2, 6, 7
     
     

    Assessment 5: Reflective Essay
    Weighting: 11%
    Due Dates: Day 7 of week 9
    Submission Details: Via Drop Box in LEARN

    Task:
    Write a reflective essay on why you chose this particular course. Describe your anticipated outcomes, the journey you experienced through the duration of the course, any highs enjoyed or disappointments suffered, what you considered to be strengths and weaknesses, do you perceive yourself to have honed existing or gleaned new entrepreneurial capabilities from the course,what are your objectives and goals with the newly acquired knowledge and skills, are you able to disseminate the new knowledge thorugh your own business, disperse your learning into your networks, or adapt work practices of the organisation you work for, etc.

    In writing your Reflective Essay, there are few points to bear in mind. The introduction describes the background or reasons for selecting this course. What are your plans once you complete this course? How will you put the newly gained knowledge and skills to use?

    The main body of the reflective essay describes the process you used for working through the course. Your essay should reveal detail about any strong and weak points; it should share your positive and negative experiences, as well as your feelings experienced through the duration of the course.
    To conclude your essay, there are a few important factors to be cognisant of. You need to determine whether or not you have achieved your goals. Why or why not? How could the outcome be different? You also need to think about what you would like to change in the course work. Maybe you will not personally benefit from this change, but future students will have a chance to do so. In your essay conclusion, think about the expertise you have gained and how you would apply it in your professional and/or personal life. Have you experienced personal growth, confidence, promotion, greater risk propensity, etc, and if so, how will you utilise this to its best advantage?

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your knowledge and understanding of the material covered in the course.

    Length and Presentation:
    Maximum 1500 words
    In Word document format
    Must include a Assessment Cover Sheet

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated a well-defined and sound perspective with obvious understanding
    · Demonstrated critical thinking and synthesis through a solid argument, opinion, or application of concept/s
    · Additional research sources, appropriately cited, other than those assigned, and examples are specific, detailed and directly support the argument
    · Demonstrated quality and depth of analysis and insight, with reasonable and objective interpretation
    · Distinguishes between fact and fiction, explores reliability, and compares and contrasts

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 5, 6

     
    Assessment 6: Business Plan Critique
    Weighting: 25%
    Due Dates: Day 7 of week 10
    Submission Details: Via Drop Box in LEARN

    Task:
    Read the business plan that will be made available to you on the LEARN Site at the end of week 7. You are to undertake the following tasks:
    1. Critique the written business plan identifying the key strengths and weaknesses of the written document as to its readability, professionalism, content – missing or otherwise, and format (5%)
    2. Evaluate the business opportunity identifying the key strengths and weaknesses of the opportunity as to why you would invest/not invest. (8%)
    Develop three new ideas as to how you could build upon and expand the initial business idea into three other businesses. Use mindmapping software that you use reguarly or access one of the free tablet Mindmapping apps available (suggestions: Mindmeister, Mindomo, iMindMap, etc). If unfamiliar with mindmaps, do a little research on how they work before getting started. Begin with the business idea as your central topic/idea and then develop a range of aspects associated with the theme. This will allow you to explore many aspects of the topic that will reveal new insights and associations. Draw up 10 - 20 associations with the idea. Take 10 of these assumptions and challenge them as a means of provoking new possibilities. Develop 3 new business ideas from these compiling a short write-up on each of your ideas. Submit your mindmap as well as the 10 assumptions that you challenged, and the 3 new business ideas that you developed as a result of challenging the initial assumptions. (12%)

    Scope:

    This assignment will assess your knowledge and understanding of the material covered over the duration of the course.
    Length and Presentation:
    Maximum 2500 words
    In Word document format
    Must include a Assessment Cover Sheet

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Demonstrated a well-defined and sound perspective with obvious understanding
    · Demonstrated critical thinking and synthesis through a solid argument, opinion, or application of concept/s
    · Additional research sources, appropriately cited, other than those assigned, and examples are specific, detailed and directly support the argument
    · Demonstrated quality and depth of analysis and insight, with reasonable and objective interpretation
    · Distinguishes between fact and fiction, explores reliability, and compares and contrasts

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7
    Submission

    All text based assignments must be submitted via Drop Box in LEARN

    There are a few points to note about the submission of assignments:

    • Assignment Submission: Assignments should be lodged via Drop Box in the LEARN system. Please refer to individual assignment tasks for specific submission details relevant to each task. Note that assignments may be processed via TURNITIN, which is an online plagiarism prevention tool.
    • Cover Sheet: As part of your assignment, please add the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet to your assignment, providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work. Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration. Where applicable, also include the word count excluding title pages and references.
    • Backup Copy of Assignments: You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing. Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Lecturer prior to submission.
    • Extensions of Time: Any request for an extension of time for the submission of an assignment should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer. Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date. Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine extenuating circumstances and proof, such as a doctor’s certificate, may be required.
    • Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade. Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late (Unless otherwise stated in 'Assessment Related Requirements' or 'Assessment Detail' above). Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.

    Resubmission & Remarking

    Resubmission of an assignment for remarking after reworking it to obtain a better mark will not normally be accepted.  Approval for resubmission will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.