ENTREP 7019 - Social Entrepreneurship

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 1 - 2017

This course provides students with a knowledge and understanding of the principles of social entrepreneurship. Case studies are presented and students then apply this knowledge to an individual topic that forms the basis of their reports. This course is relevant to entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs that have a social, environmental or non profit focus.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENTREP 7019
    Course Social Entrepreneurship
    Coordinating Unit Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation & Innov Centre
    Term Trimester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Intensive: 36 - 40 hours
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge ENTREP 5016
    Course Description This course provides students with a knowledge and understanding of the principles of social entrepreneurship. Case studies are presented and students then apply this knowledge to an individual topic that forms the basis of their reports. This course is relevant to entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs that have a social, environmental or non profit focus.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Paul Steffens

    Program Director Contact Details:
    Entrepreneurship & Innovation
    Name: Prof. Paul Steffens
    Email: paul.steffens@adelaide.edu.au


    Teaching Staff:

    Name: Dr Sharon Zivkovic

    Short Bio:
    Sharon Zivkovic is the Principal Facilitator at Community Capacity Builders. Community Capacity Builders is a for-profit social enterprise that has developed a project based, trans-disciplinary education program that combines citizenship education and leadership development. Sharon is also the Cofounder of Wicked Lab, a new technology start-up that is developing enterprise software which will assist communities and governments to address complex social policy problems. Prior to establishing Community Capacity Builders, Sharon held positions in the non-profit, private and public sectors.  

    Sharon’s qualifications are a PhD, Bachelor of Accountancy, Graduate Diploma in Education (Education and Training of Adults), Master of Entrepreneurship, Graduate Certificate in Research Commercialisation and a Vocational Graduate Certificate in Education and Training for Sustainability. For her doctoral research, Sharon investigated the scaling of a social innovation from a complexity theory perspective.

    In 2001 Sharon received the Enterprising Woman of the Year Award in recognition of her contribution towards creating strong and enterprising communities. She received the Award for Best Overall Paper at the 2012 International Social Innovation Research Conference for her paper ‘Government’s role in social innovation: Balancing unplanned exploration and planned exploitation’. In 2015 Sharon received the Pank/University of South Australia School of Management Prize for Entrepreneurship and in 2016 received a Fresh Scientist Award for her work in addressing complex social policy problems with complexity science.

    Email: sharon@communitycapacity.com.au

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Opening intensive:
    Thursday 2nd & Friday 3rd February 2017
    9am to 6pm
    Napier 210 Teaching Room

    Closing intensive:
    Thursday 16th & Friday 17th March 2017
    9am to 6pm
    Napier 210 Teaching Room
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1 Explain the characteristics that define social entrepreneurship
    2 Describe different forms of social enterprise organisations
    3 Apply and critique social entrepreneurship frameworks
    4 Explain key considerations in resourcing social entrepreneurship
    5 Apply the theory of change model for social enterprises
    6 Describe the challenges in growing a social enterprise and scaling social impact
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,5 & 6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3-5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3-5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3-6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text book: Wei-Skillern, J., Austin, J., Leonard, H. and Stevenson, H. (2007), Entrepreneurship in the Social Sector. London: Sage Publications


    Readings provided via MyUni:

    Topic 1: Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship

    1. Peredo, A.M. and McLean, M. (2006) ‘Social entrepreneurship: A Critical review of the concept’. Journal of World Business, 41 (2006) pp. 56-65

    2. Light, P. (2006) ‘Reshaping Social Entrepreneurship’, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Fall 2006, pp. 47-51.

    3. Mort, G.S., Weerawardena, J., and Carnegie, K. (2003). ‘Social entrepreneurship: Towards conceptualisation’. International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, 8 (1): 76-89

    4. Drayton, W. (2002), 'The citizen sector: Becoming as entrepreneurial and competitive as business', California management review, 44(3): 120-132

    5. Simons, R. (2000), ‘Social Enterprise: An opportunity to harness capacities’, Research and Advocacy Briefing Paper, No. 7, December 2000, The Smith Family

    6. Nowak, M. (2005), ‘Profiles of Change: Easy Being Nic’, Social Fusion’s Leadership Series, Social Fusion

    7. Martin, R.L. & Osberg, S. (2007). ‘Social entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition’. Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring 2007, pp. 28-39.

    8. Dees, G.J. (1998) ‘The Meaning of ‘Social Entrepreneurship’, Stanford University, Draft Report for the Kauffman Centre for Entrepreneurial Leadership, 6pp.

    9. Defoourny, J. & Nyssens, M. (2012), 'The EMES Approach of Social Enterprises in a Comparative Perspective'

    10. Goldstein, J.A., Hazy,  J.K. and Silberstang, J. (2008) 'Complexity and social entrepreneurship: A Fortuitous Meeting', Emergence: Complexity & Organization, 10 (3).

    11. Bloom, P.N. and Dees, G. (2008) ‘Cultivate your Ecosystem’, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2008, pp. 45-53.

    12. Kania, J. and Kramer, M. (2011) ‘Collective Impact’, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Winter 2011, pp. 35-41.

    Topic 2: Social Enterprise

    1. Haugh, H. (2007), ‘Community-Led Social Venture Creation’, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, March 2007, 31 (2), pp. 161-182

    2. Montgomery, N. (2006), ‘Co-Op Comeback in the Outback: Rural communities are providing funds to plug the drain of essential services’, Ethical Investor, April 2006, issue 54, pp. 31-34.

    3. Barraket, J., Mason, C., and Blain, B. (2016), Finding Australia's Social Enterprise Sector 2016: Final Report, Social Traders and CSI Swinburne, Melbourne.

    4. Duniam, M. & Eversole, R. (2014), Social Enterprises and Local Government: A Scoping Study, Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government, Sydney.

    Topic 3: Social Entrepreneurship Framework
    1. Yunus, M., Moingeon, B. & Lehmann-Ortega, L. (2010), ‘Building social business models: lessons from the Grameen experience’, Long Range Planning, vol. 43, no. 2-3, pp. 308-325.

    2. Di Domenico, M., Haugh, H. & Tracey, P. (2010), ‘Social bricolage: theorizing social value creation in social enterprises’, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 681-703.

    Topic 4: Resourcing Social Entrepreneurship

    1. Philanthropy Australia (2015), Fast Facts & Stats.

    2. Liffman, M. (2007) ‘The cultural and social history of philanthropy in Australia’, Australian Philanthropy, issue 67, Summer 2007, pp. 4-5.

    3. Lyons, M., North-Samardzic, A. & Young, A. (2007), ‘Capital Access of Nonprofit Organisations’, Agenda, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 99-110.

    4. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (2013), The Social Enterprise Development and Investment Funds: Progress Report June 2013, Canberra: Australian Government.

    5. Wilson, K. E., Silva, F., & Ricardson, D. (2015). Social Impact Investment: Building the Evidence Base. SSRN 2562082.

    6. Lehner, O. M., & Nicholls, A. (2014). 'Social finance and crowdfunding for social enterprises: a public–private case study providing legitimacy and leverage', Venture Capital, 16(3), 271-286.


    Topic 5: Defining the Social Value Proposition

    1. W.K. Kellogg Foundation (2004) Logic Model Development Guide, Updated January 2004, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Michigan

    2. Brest, P. (2010), ‘The Power of Theories of Change’. Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring 2010, pp. 47-51.

    Topic 6: Scaling Social Impact

    1. Dees, J.; Anderson, B.B., Wei-Skillern, J. (2002) Pathways to Social Impact: Strategies for Scaling Out Successful Social Innovations, CASE Working Paper Series No. 3, Centre for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship, Faqua School of Business, Duke University.

    2. Mulgan, G. (2006) ‘The Process of Social Innovation’, Innovations, Spring 2006, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 145-162.

    3. Westley, F., Antadze, N., Riddell, D. J., Robinson, K., & Geobey, S. (2014). Five Configurations for Scaling Up Social Innovation Case Examples of Nonprofit Organizations From Canada. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 0021886314532945.
    Recommended Resources
    Recommended Resources
    There is a wide range of material on the course topic available. The following provides some additional reading guidance if you are interested in reading further on the topic.

    Dees, G.J., Emerson, J. and Economy, P. (2002) Strategic Tools for Social Entrepreneurs: Enhancing the Performance of Your Enterprising Nonprofit, Wiley, New York.

    Emerson, J. and Twersky, F. (1996), New Social Entrepreneurs: The Success, Challenges and Lessons of Non-Profit Enterprise Creation, The Roberts Foundation: Homeless Economic Development Fund, San Francisco.

    Leadbeater, C. (1997), The Rise of the social entrepreneur, DEMOS, London
     

    Library Resources
    The University of Adelaide’s Barr Smith Library provides a range of learning resources including texts, journals, periodicals, magazines, and access to online databases and information services. It also offers a virtual library which is accessible via the University’s website. Access to the Library's electronic resources.

    Online Learning
    MyUni is the University of Adelaide's online learning environment. It is used to support traditional face-to-face lectures, tutorials and workshops at the University. MyUni provides access to various features including announcements, course materials, discussion boards and assessments for each online course of study.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is offered in blended learning mode with the face-to-face component offered as intensives.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a guide, a 3 unit course comprises a total of 156 hours work  (this includes face-to-face contact, any online components, and self
    directed study).
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Day Topic Reading/Activities
    1 1: Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship Core Text: Chapter 1

    Readings: Topic 1.1-12

    Activity: Ashoka (Video) and Gent en Garde Cases

    Case Questions
    2: Social Enterprise Readings: Topic 2.1-4

    Activity: Various Cases (Videos)

    Questions for each case
    2 2: Social Enterprise (Continued)
    3: Social Entrepreneurship Framework Core Text: Chapter 2, pp. 9-44

    Readings: Topic 3.1-2

    Activity: Steve Mariotti and NFTE Case (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 28-44)

    Case Questions
    3 4: Resourcing Social Entrepreneurship Core Text: Chapters 3-5

    Readings: Topic 4.1-6

    Activities:
    Case 1: IPODERAC (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 151-169); Case Questions

    Case 2: Guide Dogs for the Blind (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 204-229); Case Questions

    Case 3: KaBOOM! (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 230-258); Case Questions
    5: Defining the Social Value Proposition
    Core Text: Chapter 7

    Readings: Topic 5.1-2

    Activity:
    The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy Case (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 345-376)

    Case Questions
    4 5: Defining the Social Value Proposition (Continued)
    6: Scaling Social Impact Core Text: Chapter 6;

    Readings: Topic 6.1-3;

    Activity: STRIVE Case (Wei-Skillern et al., 2007, pp. 271-294)

    Case Questions
    Specific Course Requirements
    Preparation for case study discussions:

    10% of the assessment for this course is from active participation in case study discussions during the 4 days of face-to-face sessions. For Topics 1 and 2, videos of case studies will be screened and students will be asked to apply the content of the topics to the cases shown in the videos. There is no pre-reading required for the video case studies for Topics 1 and 2.
    The case studies for Topics 3 to 6 are from the core text. For Topics 3 to 6 students are required to read the case studies in the core text and prepare answers to the questions specified at 4.3 Learning Activities Summary before the face-to-face session for the topic. Note: (1) Whilst the case studies are from the core text, many of the case questions are different to those specified in the core text. (2) Students will need access to a copy of the core text before day 2.

    Access to a social enterprise:

    For Assignment 2 you will need to identify a social enterprise, obtain permission to use them as a case study, and get their agreement to have access to the information required to undertake assignment 2.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    An overview of the course assessment appears in the following table. Details appear in the following section:

    #Assessment TaskLengthWeightLearning Outcomes
    1 Submit and present answers for one case study 400 words 10% 1-6: depends on which case study chosen
    2 Submission to inquiry 1800 words 30% 1
    3 Internal report and logic model 3000 words 50% 3, 4, 5, 6
    4 Participation in case study discussions See below 10% 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Total 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students must complete all course assessment requirements.

    Course results are subject to moderation by the ECIC Board of Examiners
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment 1: Submit answers for one case study
    Weighting: 10%
    Submission Details: Via Turnitin link in MyUni

    Task:
    Select one case study from those assigned for Topics 4, 5 and 6. Prepare a summary of your answers for this case study.
    You will present your answers to your chosen case study at the closing intensive

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of Topic 4, 5 or 6.

    Length and Presentation:
    400 word summary containing key points from your answers to one case study

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Addressing all questions for the case study
    · Demonstrating a clear understanding of the course material and ability to relate the course material to the assignment questions
    · Clarity of expression, good use of language
    · Logical planning, structure and sequence in presenting your findings
    · Overall presentation, including correct grammar, spelling and punctuation



    Assessment 2: Submission to Inquiry
    Weighting: 30%
    Submission Details: Via Turnitin link in MyUni

    Task:
    Given the failure of Australia’s first Social Entrepreneurs Network, an inquiry has been established to investigate if the formation of a new network would progress the field of social entrepreneurship in Australia. By referring to the relevant literature and your own experiences and practice write a submission for the inquiry’s terms of reference:
    The terms of reference for the inquiry are:
    1. By comparing and contrasting the different meanings attributed to the term social entrepreneurship, do you believe it is possible to develop a Social Entrepreneurs Network in Australia that will strengthen the collective voice of social entrepreneurs without diminishing the distinctive contribution of each perspective? (70%)
    2. What membership structure do you suggest the proposed Social Entrepreneurs Network adopt and why? For example (but not limited to these examples): successful individual social entrepreneurs only; or successful individual social entrepreneurs from the non-profit sector only, or anyone with an interest in social entrepreneurship - practitioners, consultants and academics (10%)
    3. What aims should the Social Entrepreneurs Network adopt and why? (10%)
    4. What are the potential benefits and risks of establishing a Social Entrepreneurs Network in Australia? (10%)

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the Topic 1 and Topic 2 course topics.

    Length and Presentation:
    1,800 words maximum
    Present as a submission to an inquiry that addresses the specified terms of reference.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Addressing all relevant areas of the assignment questions
    · Demonstrating a clear understanding of the course material and ability to relate the course material to the assignment questions
    · Evidence of wider reading, research, and of critical analysis of the issues and concepts used
    · Clarity of expression, good use of language
    · Logical planning, structure and sequence in presenting your findings
    · Overall presentation, including correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
    · Use of references in formulating your responses including proper acknowledgment and the appropriate use of references



    Assessment 3: Internal Report and Logic Model
    Weighting: 50%
    Submission Details: Via Turnitin link in MyUni

    Task:
    Identify a social enterprise, obtain permission to use them as a case study, and get their agreement to have access to the information required to undertake this assignment.
    You need to show evidence that you have gone to the relevant literature as well as to an actual social enterprise and produce:
    1. An internal report that:
    a. Describes all of the components of the social entrepreneurship framework and the use of bricolage for one of the social enterprise’s programs (40%)
    b. Clearly defines the social value proposition of the program (15%)
    c. Compares and contrasts different approaches for scaling a program’s social impact and makes recommendations for how the social enterprise could best scale the program’s social impact (25%)
    2. A diagram of a ‘basic’ logic model OR a theory of change for the program (20%)

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the Topic 3, 4, 5, and 6 course topics.

    Length and Presentation:
    Report 3,000 words maximum

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    · Addressing all relevant areas of the assignment questions
    · Demonstrating a clear understanding of the course material and ability to relate the course material to the assignment questions
    · Evidence of wider reading, research, and critical analysis of the issues and concepts used
    · Clarity of expression, good use of language
    · Logical planning, structure and sequence in presenting your findings
    · Overall presentation, including correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
    · Use of references in formulating your responses including proper acknowledgment and the appropriate use of references



    Assessment 4: Participation in Case Study Discussions
    Weighting: 10%
    Submission Details: In class

    Task:
    For Topics 1 and 2, videos of case studies will be screened and students will be asked to apply the content of the topics to the cases shown in the videos. There is no pre-reading required for the video case studies for Topics 1 and 2.
    The case studies for Topics 3 to 6 are from the core text. Note: whilst the case studies are from the core text, many of the case questions are different to those specified in the core text. For Topics 3 to 6, students are required to read the case studies in the core text and prepare answers to the questions specified in the topic notes before the face-to-face session for the topic the case study relates to.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of all course topics.

    Length and Presentation:
    Active participation in case study discussions in class

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    Active participation in discussions and adhering to the following ground rules:
    · We will respect confidentiality
    · We will share time equitably to ensure the participation of all
    · We will listen carefully and not interrupt
    · We will keep an open mind and be open to learning
    · We will not be disrespectful of the speaker even if we do not respect their views
    Submission
    All text based assignments must be submitted via MyUni.
    Please refer to step by step instructions: MyUni Learning Centre

    There are a few points to note about the submission of assignments:
    • Assignment Submission:  Assignments should not be emailed to the instructor; they must be lodged via the MyUni Course site (unless specified to do both). Note that assignments may be processed via TURNITIN, which is an online plagiarism prevention tool.
    • Cover Sheet:  Please submit, separate to your assignment, the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work.  Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration.
    • Backup Copy of Assignments:  You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing.  Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Lecturer prior to submission.
    • Extensions of Time:  Any request for an extension of time for the submission of an assignment should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer.  Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date.  Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine extenuating circumstances and proof, such as a doctor’s certificate, may be required.
    • Failure to submit: Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade.  Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late (Unless otherwise stated in 'Assessment Related Requirements' or 'Assessment Detail' above) Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.

    Resubmission & Remarking

    Resubmission of an assignment for remarking after reworking it to obtain a better mark will not normally be accepted.  Approval for resubmission will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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