ENTREP 3050 - ECIC Study Tour

North Terrace Campus - Winter - 2016

This course is an intensive overseas study tour, with up to 80 contact hours expected. The Study Tour will involve visiting an overseas location for approximately two weeks, and will involve academic seminars, group work, industry and government visits and cultural activities. This course is focussed on Entrepreneurship (the Entrepreneurship Experience). Students will learn to understand what entrepreneurship is all about, particularly in a foreign environment. The course will be relevant to students no matter whether they wish to start up their own business, work for a small entrepreneurial firm or for a larger corporation where there is always a need to find new markets and commercialise new products. The entrepreneurial process is important to not-for-profit organisations, government, and, of course, commercial ventures.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENTREP 3050
    Course ECIC Study Tour
    Coordinating Unit Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation & Innov Centre
    Term Winter
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 80 hours
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Assumed Knowledge 1 Semester of successful undergraduate study
    Course Description This course is an intensive overseas study tour, with up to 80 contact hours expected. The Study Tour will involve visiting an overseas location for approximately two weeks, and will involve academic seminars, group work, industry and government visits and cultural activities. This course is focussed on Entrepreneurship (the Entrepreneurship Experience). Students will learn to understand what entrepreneurship is all about, particularly in a foreign environment. The course will be relevant to students no matter whether they wish to start up their own business, work for a small entrepreneurial firm or for a larger corporation where there is always a need to find new markets and commercialise new products. The entrepreneurial process is important to not-for-profit organisations, government, and, of course, commercial ventures.
    Course Staff
    Name: Dr Wendy Lindsay

    Short Bio: Wendy holds an MBA from Bond University, and a Master of Advanced Business Practice from the University of South Australia. Her PhD, obtained from The University of Adelaide, adopted a repeated measures longitudinal research design to examine the effects of personal values, entrepreneurial attitude, and entrepreneurial intentions on business start-up behaviour of nascent entrepreneurs. Her research interests include opportunity recognition, entrepreneurial attitude, values, business start-up behaviour, social entrepreneurship, gender issues, family business, well-being/quality of life and cultural influences on Indigenous business.

    Wendy’s academic experience comprises lecturing (face-to-face and online) in the entrepreneurship and innovation area at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels at the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia, and Bond University.

    Wendy’s business experience includes general management in the professional practice environment, and through provision of consultancy services to a diverse range of clients. She has founded/co-founded businesses in the areas of financial management, administration, tourism accommodation, e-learning streaming media, offshore Indigenous entrepreneurship training, and most recently, a registered training organisation. Wendy also enjoys community outreach through Rotary and volunteers with Little Athletics.

    Email: wendy.lindsay@adelaide.edu.au 

    Phone: +61 8 8313 2564

    Personal Link: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/wendy.lindsay
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    This is a 2 week intensive study tour to South Africa to provide students with insights to Entrepreneurship within uncertain environments. The tour will include site visits, a series of lectures, and group discussion

    Learning outcomes:

    By the end of this course students will:
    1. Appreciate the importance of creativity, innovation and design thinking to identify ideas for solutions that lead to creation of new or enhancement of existing opportunities
    2. Define and apply detailed knowledge of the entrepreneurial process using appropriate tools and frameworks
    3. Understand the importance of the environment (ethical, cultural, innovation, sustainability, and global issues) and its influence on strategic decision making for entrepreneurial activity
    4. Demonstrate effective leadership in creating and participating in a resourceful, collaborative entrepreneurial team
    5. Determine how an entrepreneurial ecosystem may impact the establishment and growth of entrepreneurial ventures
    6. Understand how cultural differences, ethical perception, economic challenges and uncertain environments can create profound long-lasting impact on society
    7. Be an effective oral and written communicator using appropriate presentation styles for intended audience, purpose and context


    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 6, 7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2, 4, 7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3, 6, 7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3, 4, 6, 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no required textbook.
    Recommended Resources
    Readings will be provided on MyUni
    Online Learning
    Course Notes & booklet will be printed and provided to teh students at the airport.

    Readings a
    re all available electronically for enrolled students by download from MyUni

    Library Resources
    The University of Adelaide’s Barr Smith Library provides a range of learning resources including texts, journals, periodicals, magazines, and access to online databases and information services. It also offers a virtual library which is accessible via the University’s website. The University Library web page is: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/ 
    From this link, you are able to access the Library's electronic resources.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is offered in blended learning mode with the face-to-face component offered as intensives.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a guide, a 3 unit course comprises a total of 156 hours work (this includes face-to-face contact, any online components, and self-directed study).
    Learning Activities Summary
    Learning Activities Summary
    Session Date Topic Readings/Activities
    PD See MyUni Pre-Departure:
    Background Reading
    OECD Economic Survey: South Africa 2015
    GEM Global Report
    1 See MyUni What is Innovation?
    2 See MyUni Entrepreneurial Process: An Overview
    3 See MyUni Types of Entrepreneurs
    4a See MyUni Entrepreneurship does not exist in a vacuum:
    The Environment: PESTEL Framework
    Group Activity: PESTEL
    4b See MyUni Entrepreneurship does not exist in a vacuum:
    The Environment: Opportunities and Risk
    Group Activity: Risk Assessment
    5 See MyUni Overview of the Lean Startup
    6 See MyUni Business Modelling:
    The Business Model Canvas
    Individual Activity: Business Model Canvas Presentations
    7 See MyUni What Underpins recognition and development of entrepreneurial opportunities: Creativity, design thinking, problem solving
    8 See MyUni Sustainability of Businesses
    9 See MyUni Wrap-up and de-brief:
    Short Presentations on Key Takeaways
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment  No. Form of Assessment/ Collaborative Task Length (in word count) Weighting Due Date Learning Outcome
    1 Learning Logs/Journals
    Two submitted during the tour
    (Individual Assignment)
    Min 500 words per post (no maximum applies)

    10%

     During Tour
    Week 1
    1,2,4
    2 Concept Statement on Potential Opportunity
    (Individual Assignment)
    1000 words 10%s
    During Tour
    Week 1
     1, 2, 3
    3 Business Model Canvas Presentation
    (Individual Assignment)
    Oral Presentation 20%
    During Tour
    Week 2
    2, 3, 4, 5
    4 Peer Assessment of Business Model Canvas Presentations
    (Individual Assignment)
    500 words 10% During Tour
    Week 2
    2, 3, 4, 5
    5 Feasibility Study
    (Group Assignment)
    3000 words 30% On return
    15/08/2016
    1 - 6
    6 Reflective Essay
    (Individual Assignment)
    2000 words 20% On return
    29/08/2016
     
     1 - 6
    TOTAL 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students should attend all classes in order to pass the course. There is considerable experiential learning in workshops during the intensive classes that build your knowledge and thus enable you to be successful in this course.  

    Course results are subject to moderation by the ECIC Board of Examiners

    Appropriate use of the Internet in assignments

    The purpose of this document is to assist students with appropriate use of the material they have accessed on the Internet in assignments. The Internet is a wonderful source of information and sometimes students are not aware of how to use it properly. For example, a recent case had over 70% of words copied from over 20 other sources. Furthermore, many students think this is the appropriate use of the Internet.

    IT IS NOT.

    Due to an increasing number of students infringing the University’s Academic Honesty Policy within the Master of Applied Project Management, a more rigorous method of checking assignments is used.

    There is a hierarchy of penalties, the lowest of which is the loss of some assignment marks and the student’s name being placed on the Faculty’s Academic Dishonesty Register for six months. This only occurs if I believe this occurred through error. The second level penalty is more significant which is loss of all marks for the assignment and being placed on the University’s Academic Dishonesty Register for the remainder of their time at the University. Even higher penalties can involve the University deciding the student should not graduate. This has occurred in the Master of Project Management.

    Appropriate use of the Internet denotes all directly copyied of sections of other reports in "inverted comas", as a quotation, with a citation to the source. To include a group of words without use of inverted commas and without noting where the words came from is an example of academic dishonesty.  To submit one's own work from earlier assignments without making reference to the source is also academic dishonesty.

    Students may not be aware that the University has use of an international database called Turnitin in which all direct use of other material can be traced.

    On a more positive note students need to understand the points made in any paper they access on the Internet and integrate these thoughts into their argument rather than just copying large passages. Of course this takes more work but this is what tertiary education requires and, in the end, make students into better thinkers and more able to express their ideas in their assignments.
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment 1: Learning Journals (Individual Assessment)
    Weighting: 10%
    Due Date: During Tour – Week 1
    Submission: Handed to Academic Instructor during tour

    Preamble:
    What is a learning journal? It is similar to a diary or journal entry and is used as a tool for problem solving and learning progression. The emphasis is on reflection and self-evaluation of learning … not simply to record notetaking from lectures or an experience. Learning journal writing helps to sharpen ability to observe and document one’s own learning, and to extrapolate that for self-assessment and planning purposes. Learning Journals usually focus subjectively on personal experience, reactions, and reflections; a critical record of learning as it occurs. Journaling of this nature is beneficial to students as it coalesces their thinking, determines what they are learning, where they may be struggling and why, and if further input or assistance is required.

    Task:
    Reflect and critically analyse two learning experiences, concisely communicating that learning with respect to two or more of the following items:
    • Reinforcing your learning by reflecting and evaluating the main elements that left an impression
    • What was especially interesting and gives you cause to pursue it in more detail?
    • What questions came to mind, due to relevant material read on the topic?
    • Did any key aspects accentuate your strengths or highlight possible weaknesses?
    • General cognition of prior misconceptions and altered thinking
    • Potential action or altered future path (short or longer term perspective)

    Scope:

    This assignment will assess your understanding of course topics

    Length and Presentation:
    Presentation will be in the form of two learning journals of approximately 500 words each.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    The assignment will be assessed on the basis of your ability to:
    • thread elements of theory together with practice to yield better understanding of the course material
    • understand your strengths and weaknesses as a learner
    • identify methods of learning that suit your own learning style
    • gauge how to improve your learning in the future
    • generate a clear picture of your learning progress to better position you to plan future learning

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 2, 4


    Assessment 2: Concept Statement on Potential Opportunity (Individual Assessment)
    Weighting: 10%
    Due Date: During Tour – Week 1
    Submission: Written and Handed to Academic Instructor during tour

    Task:
    A concept statement/proposal is a brief summary of an overall or business or project concept. It should contain the gist of the idea; in particular what the perceived opportunity is, what gap or problem exists and the solution provided, the value proposition, the envisaged product/s and/or service, the target market, competitors, and revenue model. Specific operational and financial details are not required. The purpose of the concept proposal is to attract the interest of potential investors or stakeholders and convince them that the idea is feasible, viable and worth investing in.

    Prepare a Concept Statement that depicts the important aspects of a potential opportunity you have identified. This project or venture idea may originate out of your critical thinking and evaluation of the Kliptown Youth Program (KYP). Identify potential opportunities that could impact the lives, education, employment, livelihood, wellbeing, social interactions, etc, of the KYP students, their stakeholders, or the community in which KYP is situated.

    A Concept Statement template is provided to guide your write up of the potential opportunity you have conceived.

    Scope:

    This assignment will assess your understanding and application of course topics

    Length and Presentation:
    Presentation is in the format of a written Concept Statement of approximately 1000 words.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
     Clear description of the problem to be solved
     Clear and realistic definition of expected customers
     Clear identification of existing market players and differentiation of your concept
     Substantiation of your concept’s value proposition
     Clear definition of strategy
     Clear, concise, grammatically written communication

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1, 2, 3

    Assessment 3: Business Model Canvas Presentation (Individual Assessment)
    Weighting: 10%
    Due Date: During Tour - Week 2
    Submission: Oral presentation to Academic Instructor and peers during tour

    Task:
    Building on from the opportunity described in your concept statement, you will further develop this through the use of the Business Model Canvas (BMC). The BMC is a strategic management and entrepreneurial tool that enables you to describe, design, challenge, invent and pivot a business model. It enables the construction of a robust value proposition for your perceived opportunity. Play with the BMC using at different iterations or alternative business models for the same product, service, or technology, before selecting the favoured option. As the Strategyzer website suggests, use sticky notes when developing each of the nine elements that comprise the BMC. Ideas need to be mobile. Use both images and words to build and describe the thinking/strategy underpinning each building block to enhance big picture understanding.

    The final result will be presented to your peers in an oral presentation. These presentations form the first step in “selling” your potential opportunity as the basis for the Group Assessment Feasibility Study.

    View the BMC video clip on the Strategyzer website to grasp a quick overview .. http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas/bmc 

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding and application of course topics

    Length and Presentation:
    An 15 minute oral presentation using the Business Model Canvas template and any other appropriate props.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    • Rationale behind the value proposition (how an organization creates, delivers and captures value)
    • Generation of a business model that is simple, relevant and intuitively understandable
    • Comprehensive coverage of the four main areas of business: offer, customers, infrastructure, financial viability
    • Optimal understanding, treatment and application of the business model design processes

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 2, 3, 4, 5

    Assessment 4: Peer Review (Individual Assessment)
    Weighting: 10%
    Due Date: During Tour
    Submission: Handed to Academic Instructor during tour

    Task:
    Using a template provided, students will evaluate the individual oral presentations of the Business Model Canvas (BMC). You will use this assessment in conjunction with further discussions with presenters and peers to select the opportunity you wish to develop through moving the BMC forward into a comprehensive written Feasibility Study Report.

    Value-add critique the compelling elements amongst your peers and identify perceived gaps or shortfalls within the presentations delivered. Do any of these opportunities trigger an interest, or build upon an existing passion? Use your assessment, level of interest and conversations as a guide to decide which opportunity you will negotiate to join as a team member. Alternatively, gauge where you can best offer skills, capabilities and/or experience to further develop the opportunity. You can also negotiate to bring team members on board to further the development of your own opportunity.

    Working as a cohesive group, students must negotiate and produce a list of the six most feasible potential opportunities, along with the respective three team members working on that opportunity.

    Inform the Academic Instructor through written submission of the team members who will progress the selected opportunity/potential venture to be further developed into the Feasibility Study report.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding and application of course topics.

    Length and Presentation:
    Completion of Peer Assessment Template of three potential opportunities presented. This to be handed to the Academic Instructor.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    • Engagement in the learning process and reflection/evaluation on learning and skill development
    • Working co-operatively and thinking analytically to provide constructive feedback from critical appraisal of peers’ work
    • Managing own learning autonomously while developing interpersonal skills
    • Development of an awareness of leadership within group dynamics

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 2, 3, 4, 5

    Assessment 5: Feasibility Study (Group Assessment)
    Weighting: 30%
    Due Date: On Return - 15/08/2016
    Submission: Online through MyUni


    Produce a Feasibility Study that is devloped from the Business Model Canvas (BMC) project or business opportunity you have modelled during the course. Use the feasibility plan outline provided.

    This can be a go, no-go, or go-if decision as long as it is clearly motivated. There are three possible recommendations for the business opportunity being presented:

    1. Yes, this appears to be a feasible and sustainable opportunity that should proceed to business planning and startup. The report should fully outline reasons and rationale within the report. Further, the report should recommend what actions are next required to capitalise on the opportunity.

    2. No, this is neither a feasible nor sustainable opportunity for further business planning. The report should fully outline reasons and rationale for this assessment. In this case the report should also suggest a course of action in response to the rejected opportunity. This could include a recommendation on what may be done to re-position the opportunity, an outline of other areas of potential opportunity discovered through the assessment process or actions that might be required in response to others who may detect or seek to exploit the opportunity.

    3. Yes, this may be a potentially feasible and sustainable opportunity if certain conditions occurr or actions were achieved. There is potential to proceed to full business planning and startup. The report should fully outline reasons and rationale and outline the conditions and/or actions that must change in order for the opportunity to become both feasible and sustainable. Where appropriate, the report should also recommend who should undertake further action and by when.

    Consider using frameworks and tools utilised in the course, as well as others that may lend further authenticity and validity to your report.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding and application of course topics

    Length and Presentation:
    The Feasibility Report has a 3000 word count limit, excluding references and appendices.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    • Logical, clear and concise descriptions, definitions and explanations covering the relevant prompts in the template
    • Comprehension of what makes a value proposition compelling
    • Thorough research of customer, market and competition
    • Provision of realistic financial details of the business opportunity
    • Clear, concise, and grammatical articulation of an innovative opportunity

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1 - 6

    Assessment 6: Reflective Essay
    Weighting: 20%
    Due Date: On return – 29 /08/2016
    Submission: Online through MyUni

    Task:
    Reflective exercises serve as a valuable means of facilitating the connection between theoretical elements and working practice, as well as to enable students to reflect on their own personal development over time. Early reflections are often characterised by skepticism and relativist attitudes to learning. Comparison between early and final reflective journal entries indicate that students critically re-evaluate many of their initial assumptions about learning experiences. . with a final reflective essay indicating that many students comprehend the value of reflective style learning journals as a key part of the learning process.

    Reflect and critically analyse key elements of the study tour and course content that resonated most with you, concisely communicating your learning with respect to:

    • Observing the operations of your own mind with a view to discovering deeper truths about yourself.

    • Careful reasoned thinking – referencing personal experiences on theories and more the generic experiences of others.

    • Adoption of a critical stance – it is not giving back just what is, but rather what might be – generating an improvement on the original.

    • Analysing/evaluating one or more personal experience(s), and attempting to generalise from that thinking to convert the experiences to tentative theories and/or enhanced understanding of the world and your path in it.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the course topics

    Length and Presentation:.
    A formal written essay with a maximum 2000 word count.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    • Demonstration of a reflection and reasoning process to make meaning of an experience
    • Addition of depth and breadth through personalization of theories, concepts, strategies, etc, presented in the course materials
    • Viewpoints and interpretations are supported, and appropriate examples are provided, as applicable.
    • Evidence of synthesis of ideas presented and insights gained throughout the course.
    • Implications for future

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1 - 6
    Submission
    All text based assignments must be submitted via MyUni.
    Please refer to step by step instructions: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/files/AssignmentStudentSubmission.pdf

    There are a few points to note about the submission of assignments:

    Assignment Submission: Assignments should not be emailed to the instructor but should be lodged via the MyUni Course site. Note that assignments may be processed via TURNITIN which is an online plagiarism prevention tool.

    Cover Sheet: Please submit, separate to your assignment, the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work. Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration.

    Backup Copy of Assignments: You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing. Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Lecturer prior to submission.

    Extensions of Time: Any request for an extension of time for the submission of an assignment should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer. Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date. Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine extenuating circumstances and proof, such as a doctor’s certificate, may be required.

    Failure to submit: Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade. Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late. Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.