ASIA 2028 - Ten Things You Should Know About China

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

Do the Chinese eat everything? Who are the Chinese? Is China communist? What is China? Do you want to learn Chinese? But which Chinese language? Who is Confucius and what did he say? What is Yin and Yang? Is there such a thing as Chinese literature? Who is arguably the most important writer in modern China and why? What do you know about the Great Leap Forward? Is the Cultural Revolution cultural and revolutionary? Do you know the colour of Deng Xiaoping's cat? What has that anything to do with the Chinese economy? This course will question almost everything you know or you think you know about China. Ten Things You Should Know aims to challenge the accepted Australian wisdom and understanding of China, past or present, as presented in the media and some popular writings. By focusing on ten topics of personality or events and their surrounding issues in China's history and societal developments, this course will provoke debates and offers alternative perspectives to the answers of the above mentioned and other questions. The course aims to achieve three major goals for the students: 1) a critical understanding of some most important issues on China, 2) placing Australia and yourself in international context and 3) critical thinking towards anyone including the lecturer in this course who talks about China. Once you finish the course you will be the leading light in topics on China when you are with your family, among your friends and in social gathering (seriously).

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ASIA 2028
    Course Ten Things You Should Know About China
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description Do the Chinese eat everything? Who are the Chinese? Is China communist? What is China? Do you want to learn Chinese? But which Chinese language? Who is Confucius and what did he say? What is Yin and Yang? Is there such a thing as Chinese literature? Who is arguably the most important writer in modern China and why? What do you know about the Great Leap Forward? Is the Cultural Revolution cultural and revolutionary? Do you know the colour of Deng Xiaoping's cat? What has that anything to do with the Chinese economy? This course will question almost everything you know or you think you know about China.
    Ten Things You Should Know aims to challenge the accepted Australian wisdom and understanding of China, past or present, as presented in the media and some popular writings. By focusing on ten topics of personality or events and their surrounding issues in China's history and societal developments, this course will provoke debates and offers alternative perspectives to the answers of the above mentioned and other questions. The course aims to achieve three major goals for the students: 1) a critical understanding of some most important issues on China, 2) placing Australia and yourself in international context and 3) critical thinking towards anyone including the lecturer in this course who talks about China.
    Once you finish the course you will be the leading light in topics on China when you are with your family, among your friends and in social gathering (seriously).
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Mobo Chang Fan Gao

    Professor Mobo Gao Coordinator l Lecturer 
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    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Monday, 26th February introduciton lecture  (no tutoirals)
    Monday 5th March China lecture  (tutorial organization)
    Monday 12th March public holiday no lecture (tutorials on China)
    Monday 19th March Chinese & Chinese language lectures on two topics followed by tutorials on Chinese
    Monday 26th March Confucianism lecture followed by  totural on Chinese language
    Monday 30th April Taoism tutorial on Confucianism
    Monday 7th May Chinese Literature tutorials on Taoism
    Monday 14th May Lu Xun and the Chinese intelligentsia tutorials on Chinese literature
    Monday 21st May The Great Leap Forward tutorials on Lu Xun and the Chinese intelligentsia
    Monday 28 May The Cultural Revolution tutorials on the Great Leap Forward
    Monday 4th June Deng's cat and the Chinese economy tutorials on the Cultural Revolution
    Moday 11th June no lectures tutorials on the Chinese economy
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes


    1 Retain relevant information in lectures, participate actively in tutorials (preparation, listening, sharing ideas and respecting the views of others) identify and access key sources of information in the discipline including journals, texts, vidual material and internet sources etc. analyse different cultural viewpoints and world views
    2 Contribute positively to group work, lead a small group (equitable participation, managing completion of a task, resolving conflicts)
    3 Locate and access appropriate information for assessment tasks (books, reports, journals, websites)locate and access appropriate information for assessment tasks (books, reports, journals, websites)
    4 Read critically for assessment (identify purpose, bias, perspective, evidence base, facts, ideas, opinions, cause, effect, logic) ‘read’ and interpret research within the discipline including: reliable sources, major themes, prominent contributors, theoretical approaches, emerging issue
    5 Able to use key sources of information within the discipline by using both primary and secondary sources of information in assignments
    6 Critically analyse ideas, and critically evaluate sources
    7 Evaluate various types and modes of information for use in assessment tasks (merit, relevance, currency and significance
    8 Evaluate resources set for an assignment set task (merit, relevance, currency and significance)
    9 Understand the characteristics of the scholarly literature within a discipline including: reliable sources, major themes, prominent contributors, theoretical approaches, emerging issues analyse and evaluate how language communicates meaning 
    10 Analyse different cultural viewpoints and world views 
    read critically for assessment (identify purpose, bias, perspective, evidence base, facts, ideas, opinions, cause, effect, logic) ‘read’ and interpret research within the discipline including: reliable sources, major themes, prominent contributors, theoretical approaches, emerging issue
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    6, 8, 9
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2, 3
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    7, 8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    8. 9
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3, 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    The reader (compulsory)

    A list of reference readings will be supplied in each lecture

    Recommended Resources

    A reference list will be supplied in the lectures

    Online Learning

    websites address will be loaded onto Myuni

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction (no tutorials)
    Week 2 China  (tutorials orgnization)
    Week 3 no lecture and tutorials on China
    Week 4 Chinese and Chinese language (tutorials on Chinese)
    Week 5 Confucianism and tutorials on Chinese language
    Week 6 Taoism and tutorial on Confucianism
    Week 7 Chinese literaturte and tutorials on Taoism
    Week 8 Lu Xun and the Chinese intelligentisa tutorials on Chinese literature
    Week 9 The Great Leap Forward and tutorials on Lu Xun and Chinese intelligentsia
    Week 10 The Cultural Revolution and tutoriasl on the Great Leap Forward
    Week 11 Deng's cat and the Chinese economy and  tutorials on the Cultural Revolution
    Week 12 no lecture and tutorials on the Chinese economy
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Structured Learning

    Lectures

    1 x 2 hour lecture per week (except public holidays) 24 hours per semester

    Tutorials

    1 x 1 hour per week, 12 hours per semester

    Self-Directed Learning

    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per wek 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester

    total of 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary

    Structured learning

    Lectures 2 hours a week for 12 weeks (except public holidays)

    Tutorials 1 hour a week for 12 weeks

    Self organized learning

    Reading 6 hours a week
    Prepapraton 2 hours a week
    Research  2 hours a week

    Assessments:

    Tutorial participation and attendance

    Essay of 2000 words

    Examination

    Small Group Discovery Experience
    • In your tutoral class you will be asked to sit with a group of 5 to 6 stuents throughout the semester
    • each week one of the group will do the presentation
    • all the others will discuss and comment on the presentation within this group
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    2000 words essay on any of the ten topics covered in the course Summative

    Fri Week 12

    30% LO 1, 5, 7, 8,9,10
    Group tutorial presentation Formative and Summative to be scheduled during seminars 20% e.g. 1,2,3,4,6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    tutorial participation formative and summative to be sheduled during the course 10% LO1, 2, 4, 8, 9, 10
    Examination summative to be scheduled for the end of the semester 40% LO3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Assessment Related Requirements
    tutorials attendance and participation are required
    Assessment Detail
    1. Tutorial participation 10%
      1. attendance 5%
      2. peer comments 5%
    2. Tutorial Presentation 20%
      1. choice of one topic out of ten
      2. presentation to your group
      3. submit to peer comments
    3. Essay 30%
      1. 2000 words
      2. submitted to Myuni through Turnitin in PDF
      3. penalty of 5% for late submission
      4. penalty of 5% for not submitting in PDF form
      5. criteria
        1. Referencing?
        2. Is there an argument?
        3. logic and clear expression in English
        4. Structure?
        5. Critical?
      6. Note that high percentage of similarity may indicate plaigarism which is NOT allowed under any circumstances
    4. Examination 40%
      1. This is largely summative
      2. to answer questions related to the topics covered in the course
      3. the aim is to demonstrate whether you have attended the lectures, read the Reader and its reveleance sources
      4. No smart phone or written materials such as encyclopedia or Reader are allowed during the examination
    Submission
    1. Essay has to be
      1. computer-typed
      2. submitted through Turin in PDF format
      3. End of Friday week 12
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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