HIST 3057 - Memory Wars in Contemporary Global Conflict

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

At the heart of contemporary global conflicts are diverging narratives of the past. This project focuses on how differing understandings of history are linked to conflicts in the present. We shall look at a wide range of case studies, including: the Sino-Japanese War and the Japanese occupation of Korea, the partition of India/Pakistan and of Israel/Palestine, Stalinism, Fascism, World War II and the Holocaust in Europe. The project also explores the connection between 'memory wars' and the rise of political extremism. Designed to be highly topical, the focus of the project is not on the past but on the politics of history in the present. The project will deepen students' understanding of some of the great conflicts in the world today. This is not a traditional undergraduate course. It is a collaborative research project in which students participate as active researchers. Each student will choose a particular country or region to research. The student will then feed the results of his/her research into a collective pool of information which is shared by the whole class. On the basis of the information gathered by the students themselves, we shall address wider, theoretical questions about the role of history, memory and identity in the modern world.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3057
    Course Memory Wars in Contemporary Global Conflict
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of level II undergraduate study
    Course Description At the heart of contemporary global conflicts are diverging narratives of the past. This project focuses on how differing understandings of history are linked to conflicts in the present. We shall look at a wide range of case studies, including: the Sino-Japanese War and the Japanese occupation of Korea, the partition of India/Pakistan and of Israel/Palestine, Stalinism, Fascism, World War II and the Holocaust in Europe. The project also explores the connection between 'memory wars' and the rise of political extremism. Designed to be highly topical, the focus of the project is not on the past but on the politics of history in the present. The project will deepen students' understanding of some of the great conflicts in the world today.
    This is not a traditional undergraduate course. It is a collaborative research project in which students participate as active researchers. Each student will choose a particular country or region to research. The student will then feed the results of his/her research into a collective pool of information which is shared by the whole class. On the basis of the information gathered by the students themselves, we shall address wider, theoretical questions about the role of history, memory and identity in the modern world.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Gareth Pritchard

    Room: Napier 508
    Telephone: 8313 4529
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Please see the course planner.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1 Demonstrate a broad knowledge of ‘memory wars’ and their role in contemporary global conflict.
    2 Demonstrate an understanding of a range of relevant theories of nationalism and collective memory.
    3 Evaluate the usefulness of these theories by applying them to the case studies that we cover in the course.
    4 Gather relevant data from a wide range of sources, including databases, newspapers and web sites, and evaluate its significance both with regard to specific ‘memory wars’ and to theories of nationalism and collective memory.
    5 Develop independent analytical positions with regard to ‘memory wars’ and their role in political conflicts in the contemporary world.
    6 Work effectively as part of a research team nested in a larger collaborative research project.
    7 Communicate findings and ideas in a range of formats.
    8 Demonstrate a sensitivity to the impact of differing understandings of the past on the world view of people of different social, cultural and political traditions
    9 Reflect critically on their participation in the project and on their own learning strategies.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 9
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 3, 4, 6, 9
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5, 9
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    6, 9
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    7, 8, 9
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    8, 9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no textbook or course reader for this course.
    Recommended Resources
    Much of the course will involve searching news websites for stories that deal with the politics of history. To this end, students will use a variety of news databases such as Google News, Factiva and Press Display. Other useful websites include: 

    Aljazeera (Europe) http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/
    BBC New (Europe) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world/europe/
    BBC Radio 4 http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/
    Spiegel Online http://www.spiegel.de/international/
    The Daily Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/
    The Guardian http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news
    Online Learning
    The project will be fully supported on Canvas. Students will be provided with a range of supporting materials, including: course guide, bibliography, links to relevant web sites (especially news webs sites), TURNITIN, interactive quizzes.

    As the project develops, students will themselves be developing and extending the learning resources that are available. Teams of students will be given collaborative tasks which produce learning aids that will be of benefit to the cohort as a whole.

    In the context of this course, the internet itself becomes an important focus of study (e.g. how different factions in ‘memory wars’ use the internet to get their message across, and what the comments on relevant websites (including YouTube and Wikipedia) tell us about conceptual structures and discursive strategies.

    The students will be using electronic platforms to store and share the data that they find. They will for example create a Wiki on memory wars that will be shared by the whole class. In their research teams they will be working in internet groups, talking to each other with IM, and collaborating on shared Google Docs (or similar online work spaces).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Each week there will be a two-hour workshop. This is the hub around which the whole course revolves and it is compulsory. 

    There will also be a one-hour interactive lecture each week. Students can listen to this on-line, though it is better if they can attend in person.

    Alongside the workshop and interactive lecture, there will be a range of voluntary sessions which students can attend if they choose, e.g. writing workshops, debates, discussions, reading groups.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS

    3 hours preparation for workshops per week = 36 hours per semester
    4 hours independent reading/research per week = 48 hours per semester
    3 hours assignment preparation per week =36 hours per semester

    TOTAL = 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Each student chooses a country on which s/he will become a specialist. Students are then grouped into regional research teams, e.g. South-East Asia, the Middle East, the Balkans, Central Europe, Russia etc. 

    In the interactive lectures, we shall cover basic conceptual and theoretical issues that are relevant to the study of memory wars in contemporary global conflicts. These include theories of nationalism, theories of collective memory, and debates about the role of historians and history teachers in the shaping of collective memory. 

    During the workshops, students sit in their research teams. The workshops will be used to train the research teams in the use of databases and internet research strategies. The most important activities in the workshops will consist of students reporting on their findings in a scaffolded structure, and then discussing the implications of their findings with the class as a whole. Some of the most important issues that we shall explore in the workshops are:

    + Memory Wars on the internet.
    + Memory Wars in school curricula, textbooks and museums.
    + Memory Wars in public architecture, statues and street names.
    + Memory Wars in academia.
    + Memory Wars in international relations.

    In the final two weeks of the project, we shall return to the key theoretical questions about the nature of nationalism, memory and collective identity and we seek to answer them in the light of the empirical data that we have collected.
    Specific Course Requirements
    There are no specific course requirements.

    However, students who can read languages other than English may, if they so desire, work in teams with other students who can speak/read the same language. For example, students who can read French may choose to work in a research team with other Francophone students, looking at French-language sources.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    SGDE is fundamental to this project. The student research teams will consist of up to 10 students. The research teams and their activities will be the focus of students’ experience. Students will sit in their research teams during the workshops. They will have to organise tasks within the teams. They will elect a team ambassador who will liaise both with staff and with other team ambassadors. The first assignment is a team assignment. The second assignment is a wiki-page produced by the team as a whole, but divided into sections that are written by designated individuals and assessed individually. Students can, however, choose in the second assignment to work with other students and be assessed collectively.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Team research plan Formative and summative Week 3 10% 4, 6, 7
    Team case study wikipage Formative and summative Week 6 20% 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
    Research essay Formative and summative Week 12 50% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8
    Reflective document Summative Week 13 20% 9
    Assessment Related Requirements
    N/A
    Assessment Detail
    Team research plan: Each research team will be required to submit a short research plan. This is a collective, group assignment. In the research plan, the team members will have to specify how they are going to divide up the case study wiki-page (which the team will have to produce as the second assignment). Each team member will be assigned a specific heading for the wiki. The team members themselves must decide how the tasks will be allocated. Team members will each write a very brief description of what they intend to do in their section of the wiki, and what kinds of sources they will be using. Weighting: 10%.

    Case study wiki-page: Each team is responsible for producing a case study wiki-page (for example, on memory wars in Ireland or in Ukraine). The wiki-page will be divided into sections (for example on museums, public monuments, school textbooks etc.). Each student will take responsibility for ONE section. However, two or more team members may – if they wish – work collectively and combine their word allocations. The wiki-page of each team will be a research tool for the group as a whole. It should contain hyperlinks to useful web material, reading lists etc. Weighting: 20%.

    Research essay: The synoptic assessment is a research essay. This is an individual assignment. In the research essay, students will address a general question about memory wars and contemporary global conflict. In answering this question, the student will have to draw not just on the case study on which s/he is now an expert, but on a range of case studies. The case study wiki will provide an invaluable research tool. Weighting: 50%.

    Reflective document: Alongside the research essay, the student submits a short reflective document. Students provide information on their attendance and participation in the team activities, and reflect on what they think they did well and on what they could do to improve their performance. Weighting: 20%.
    Submission
    All assignments (apart from the wiki-page) are submitted via Turnitin in Canvas.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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