HIST 2091 - Thinking About Emotion in Historical Perspective

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

How we feel and what counts as an emotion changes across time and geographical space. This course introduces students to the history of emotions, highlighting how our emotional worlds, how we feel and show our feelings, what language we use to express emotion, and the social acceptability of particular emotional expressions, have changed over time. Students will encounter some of the key concepts or approaches used by historians to understand how emotions worked in the past, using a range of examples from the medieval to the modern and across the world that highlight the diversity of emotional experience. Key issues that can be explored by students include how emotions are involved in national identity and the making of communities; how emotions are shaped by gender or within families; how the media uses emotion to shape public opinion; and the role of emotion in legal practices and the creation of justice. More generally, we will consider how emotions shape social, economic, political and cultural change. Through lectures, workshops and structured learning activities, students will have the opportunity to try out some of key history of emotion concepts by applying them to original historical sources. In learning about the past, students might also come to better understand the operation of emotion in the present.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 2091
    Course Thinking About Emotion in Historical Perspective
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level 1 undergraduate study
    Course Description How we feel and what counts as an emotion changes across time and geographical space. This course introduces students to the history of emotions, highlighting how our emotional worlds, how we feel and show our feelings, what language we use to express emotion, and the social acceptability of particular emotional expressions, have changed over time. Students will encounter some of the key concepts or approaches used by historians to understand how emotions worked in the past, using a range of examples from the medieval to the modern and across the world that highlight the diversity of emotional experience. Key issues that can be explored by students include how emotions are involved in national identity and the making of communities; how emotions are shaped by gender or within families; how the media uses emotion to shape public opinion; and the role of emotion in legal practices and the creation of justice. More generally, we will consider how emotions shape social, economic, political and cultural change. Through lectures, workshops and structured learning activities, students will have the opportunity to try out some of key history of emotion concepts by applying them to original historical sources. In learning about the past, students might also come to better understand the operation of emotion in the present.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Katie Barclay

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will:

    have a focused understanding of the historiography of the history of emotions;

    2 be aware of how different methodologies and concepts shape debates in the history of emotions;

    3 be able to locate, contextualise and analyse primary and secondary sources relevant to the history of emotions as part of independent or collaborative research;

    4 be able to apply appropriate history of emotions methodologies or concepts to primary and secondary sources to engage with historical problems;

    5 be able to effectively use appropriate spoken and written formats to portray their understanding of the history of emotions;

    6 be able to work independently of staff to achieve research goals in the history of emotion and contribute findings to group learning activities;

    7 be able to proficiently use contemporary technologies to communicate learning and research findings;

    8 be able to participate in professional practice and ethical issues in researching the history of emotions;

    9 have an understanding of the diversity of emotions across historical time and the ways they shape and are shaped by temporal and geographical context.



    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 3, 4, 6,
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    9
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1, 9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Students will be required to access primary and secondary literature for this course through the university virtual learning environment, as well as using library resources. There are no significant resource or workload impacts that are not currently considered under normal teaching arrangements.



    Recommended Resources
    Students will be provided with a course outline that includes reading lists, web-links, library resources, essay-writing guides etc. This is a vital resource that will be accessible through the university learning environment.



    Online Learning
    Course outlines and learning guides will be available on Canvas when enrolment opens. Reading recommended for each lecture and workshop shall be made available as part of the course outline from week 1. Additional reading or resources, in response to formative assessment, will be made available over the course in response to demand or need. Announcements within Canvas will be used when needed. Structured learning and workshop activities will be supported by an online discussion forum (on canvas), which will allow students to discuss ongoing content and to prepare for group work activities. Lectures will be recorded and available online.



  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is taught in a two-hour window, consisting of a lecture and workshop, and supported by a structured learning activity.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Workload Hours
    1 x 1-hour lecture per week 12
    1 x 1 hour workshop per week 12
    1 x 1 hour structured learning activity per week 12
    6 hours of independent reading each week 72
    1 hour of independent research each week 12
    3 hours of assignment preparation each week 36
    Total 156 hours
    Learning Activities Summary
    After some introductory material, material will be grouped into modules. Content modules may vary from year to year to accommodate guest lectures from leading international experts in the field of the history of emotion, but will be unified in that each will introduce students to at least one key concept in the history of emotions and a range of examples for understanding the application of that concept within a historiographical field, and will provide students opportunities to apply these ideas themselves. The following timetable is indicative only and may change each year.

    Week Topic
    1 What is the History of Emotions?
    2 Finding Emotions in Historical Sources
    3 Emotions & the Group
    4 Emotions & the Group
    5 Emotions & the Group
    6 Emotions & Gender
    7 Emotions & Gender
    8 Emotions & Media
    9 Emotions & Media
    10 Emotions & Law
    11 Emotions & Law
    13 Historical Emotions: Shaping the Present


    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Small group discovery experience is central to this course and is formed through a combination of the structured learning activity and related workshop activities, which are designed to ensure that student teams undertake active research to make discoveries, generate new knowledge, and engage in peer learning. Students shall conduct independent research and knowledge creation through their individual structured learning activities, particularly in week two of a module when they have to apply concepts to groups of primary sources. They then bring their findings from these activities to workshops, where they share their findings in small groups. In these small groups, guided by experienced researchers and structured activities, students shall be asked to interrogate their conclusions and test them against
    each other’s ideas and findings. In doing so, students not only demonstrate their own new research findings, but through peer learning have their ideas critically assessed and challenged. Then as a group, they report back to the whole room and a similar whole group debate
    occurs, guided by staff. In later weeks, independent research activity is enhanced through a loosening of the structured activities to allow students to independently find and select their own case studies and sources from those available in the library or on websites of resources. This encourages critical thinking and greater independence in their research skills. The small group discovery experience is assessed
    through the structured learning assignment and the methodology essay.



  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
    Answers to structured learning outcome questions (c.1000 words) Formative & summative 20% 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8
    Methodology essay (1500 words) Formative & summative 30% 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
    Research essay (2500 words) Summative 50% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9
    Assessment Related Requirements
    All pieces of assessment must be handed in to pass the course. This is a hurdle requirement.



    Assessment Detail
    Answers to structured learning outcome questions (1,000 words): Each structured learning activity will be accompanied by set questions for you to engage with and to guide the findings which you bring to group discussion. For this assessment, you will be required to submit responses to one module’s set of questions (i.e., both those relating to weeks 1 and 2 of a two week module). Submission will fall after class discussion, enabling you to edit responses and benefit from peer learning. This assignment supports your in-class group work, structured learning activities, and encourages participation. 20%

    Methodology essay (1,500 words): This essay will tests understanding of the methodologies and concepts used in the history of emotions. You shall select from a range of questions designed to assess this knowledge and skillset.

    Research essay (2500 words): This essay provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate understanding of historiographical debates in the field and to use research with primary sources and case studies to engage with historical problems. You will be able to select from a list of research questions or to create your own question.

    Submission
    Submission will be through Turnitin.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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