PHYSIOL 3104 - Cellular & Systems Neurobiology

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

Cellular & Systems Neurobiology encompasses the study of the central and peripheral nervous system. We explore neuroscience from the level of ion channels, receptors and cell signalling, through to system level topics of sensory perception, homeostasis, higher cognition, learning and memory. Research case studies from the primary literature introduce cutting edge concepts and methods, whilst also developing critical evaluation skills. In-class review sessions are provided to assist with revising key material. Conceptual knowledge is assessed with four block exams throughout the semester and on-line tutorials.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PHYSIOL 3104
    Course Cellular & Systems Neurobiology
    Coordinating Unit Medicine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites PHYSIOL 2510
    Incompatible PHYSIOL 3001
    Assumed Knowledge PHYSIOL 2520
    Course Description Cellular & Systems Neurobiology encompasses the study of the central and peripheral nervous system. We explore neuroscience from the level of ion channels, receptors and cell signalling, through to system level topics of sensory perception, homeostasis, higher cognition, learning and memory. Research case studies from the primary literature introduce cutting edge concepts and methods, whilst also developing critical evaluation skills. In-class review sessions are provided to assist with revising key material. Conceptual knowledge is assessed with four block exams throughout the semester and on-line tutorials.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Sunita Ramesh

    Course coordinator:  Dr Sunita Ramesh
    email: sunita.ramesh@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    see the Course Planner for details
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    1. Demonstrate an understanding of foundational
    concepts of neurophysiology from the molecular to the systems levels.

    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the signalling processes involved in modulating
    neurophysiological functions for higher cognitive function and adaptation.

    3. Explain the major theories and supporting evidence for quantitative principles of
    neurobiology.

    4. Read and interpret case studies based on primary literature.

    5. Solve quantitative problems based on knowledge of first principles in neurobiology.

    6. Demonstrate an understanding the pathophysiological basis of nervous system diseases and
    the relevance of neuroscience research to ethics, environment, and health
    care.

    7. Acquire, read, interpret and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in
    a planned and timely manner

    8. Work in groups and individually in the pursuit of scientific knowledge

    9. Be conversant in a broad range of investigative methods and scientific
    applications, including the selection, implementation, ethical use, and
    limitations of the experimental techniques in physiology, neuroscience and
    related fields of research.








    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    4-7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    7-9
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3-9
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    8
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    7-9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Few additional resources are needed to complete this
    course.



    Recommended Resources

    Course reading will focus on review articles and published
    scientific papers, posted on the course Canvas website. There is no required
    textbook.


    ONLINE RESOURCES (free) recommended in the course
    include:

    Neuroscience, edited by D Purves et al., NCBI
    Bookshelf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK10799/

    Nernst Goldman Equation simulator, S Wright, University of Arizona
    http://www.nernstgoldman.physiology.arizona.edu/

    Topics in Biology, Khan Academy
    https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology

    Open University, iTunes
    http://www.open.edu/itunes/subjects



    Online Learning
    This course will use canvas as a major component. All lecture notes, tutorial activities
    and lecture recordings will be posted on Canvas.  Announcements and
    weekly student update emails will be sent via the site. The quizzes at the end
    of each module will be administered online via canvas. Theory will be presented
    in lectures and assigned published scientific papers, and supported by in-class
    review sessions (‘lectorials’). On-line tutorials will
    revise concepts and allow development of problem solving skills.







  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Blended learning will take place in this course.  Large group lecture sessions
    will vary.  Some sessions will be lectures, others will be question and answer
    sessions and case study (journal club) scenarios.  Students will be
    divided into small groups to undertake problem-solving tasks in these sessions
    and within the tutorial groups. Some lectures will be pre-recorded and utlilise
    the flipped classroom approach.



    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Workload- Structured learning
    Type                                Number of sessions               Duration of each session (h)           Total hours
    Lectures                            42                                        1                                                  42
    Exams in class                     3                                        1.5                                               4.5

    Assessment Tasks (semester)
    3 midsemester exams   at 20% each; total hours 36
    1 final exam (not cumulative) at 20%;   total hours 12

    Non-contact hours (semester)
    Weekly reading & other study (h/lecture);  total hours 50.4


    SUM TOTAL HOURS PER SEMESTER: 157

    Learning Activities Summary
    WEEK     LECTURE TOPIC

    1            Development of the central nervous system
    2            Neurotransmission and the cellular basis of memory and learning
    3            Introduction to sensory systems
    4            Olfaction and gustation
    5            Visual system
    6            Hearing and balance;  clinical translation
    7            Overview of the peripheral nervous system
    8            Neural crest development, and neural control of homeostasis
    9            Neural control of smooth muscle and organ function; genetic tools
    10          Overview of ion channels
    11          Principles of electrical signalling
    12          Synaptic signalling and information processing in the nervous system








    Specific Course Requirements
    Prerequisite:
    Physiol 2510 Physiology IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular Systems

    Assumed knowledge:
    PHYSIOL 2520 Physiology IIB: Systems & Homeostasis









    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students are encouraged to work in study groups for preparing and revising the lecture material and associated online tutorial exercises.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Mid-term examinations (in class)                3  at 20% each         
    Final examination (not cumulative)             1 at 20%
    Formative online problem sets                    4 at 0% each
    Online tutorials                                          4 at 4% each
    Guest lectures                                          2 at 2% each



    Examinations are MCQ tests (summative, one for each of the four
    blocks of lectures). Online tutorials are provided to allow revision
    of main concepts (formative), and paired with online quizzes (summative). Guest lectures
    require sudents to submit a question (for each lecture) in class after the lecture.

    This course will use canvas as a major
    component. All lecture notes, tutorial activities and lecture recordings will
    be posted on Canvas.  Announcements and
    weekly student update emails will be sent via the site. The quizzes at the end
    of each module will be administered online via canvas. Theory will be presented
    in lectures and assigned published scientific papers, and supported by in-class
    review sessions (‘lectorials’). On-line tutorials will revise concepts and
    allow development of problem solving skills.







    Assessment Related Requirements



    Assessment Detail
    Mid-term examinations (in class)               3  at 20% each         
    Final examination (not cumulative)             1 at 20%
    Formative online problem sets                   4 at 0% each
    Online tutorials                                         4 at 4% each
    Guest lectures                                           2 at 2% each
    Submission
    Not applicable
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    SELTS for the course and for the instructors will be run annually.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.