HLTH SC 2012 - Hacking Health

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

Hacking Health will bring together health professionals and technologists to both understand problems that need to be solved and to use cutting edge technology to develop innovative solutions for these problems. Hacking Health uses the principles of Translational Science to provide students with skills and practical knowledge to (i) creatively assess current health challenges in the community and collaboratively develop innovative solutions (ii) identify and appraise current technologies/interventions and strategies for effectiveness (iii) scope the role for potential new technologies/interventions (iv) consider the determinants of successful implementation of new or existing technologies/interventions. The course will build on the foundation skills developed in Clinical Skills and Simulation. Health clinicians and researchers from a wide range of disciplines will showcase successful innovation projects and students will then work in groups on solutions for a significant challenge within the health system.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HLTH SC 2012
    Course Hacking Health
    Coordinating Unit Health Sciences Faculty Office
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Incompatible HLTH SC 2105 Reflect, Resolve, Research Questions in Health
    Restrictions BHlthMedSc (Advanced) students only
    Course Description Hacking Health will bring together health professionals and technologists to both understand problems that need to be solved and to use cutting edge technology to develop innovative solutions for these problems. Hacking Health uses the principles of Translational Science to provide students with skills and practical knowledge to (i) creatively assess current health challenges in the community and collaboratively develop innovative solutions (ii) identify and appraise current technologies/interventions and strategies for effectiveness (iii) scope the role for potential new technologies/interventions (iv) consider the determinants of successful implementation of new or existing technologies/interventions. The course will build on the foundation skills developed in Clinical Skills and Simulation. Health clinicians and researchers from a wide range of disciplines will showcase successful innovation projects and students will then work in groups on solutions for a significant challenge within the health system.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Rick Wiechula

    Dr Hossein Afzali
    Professor John Karnon
    Dr Rick Wiechula
    Dr David Foley
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    A full course timetable will be available in MyUni Canvas.

    Key topics include:
    Module 1: Needs assessment of population health needs + Service mapping (identifying a priority area)
    Module 2: Option appraisal (identifying potential solutions)
    Module 3: Evaluation process (including feasibility and acceptability, and full evaluation to demonstrate safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness)
    Module 4: Implementation frameworks/models
    Module 5: Business case development and student presentations

    This course will be presented as a mix of lecture/seminars and workshops and delivered in 3 hour blocks. Weekly 1 hour seminars (including guest speakers) will be used to introduce and illustrate the course components. Workshops (2 hours/week) will be conducted in small groups (SGDE), providing interactive group discussions to clarify and apply the course components from seminars and improve understanding. SGDE will expose students to knowledge translation experts from disciplines across the Faculty (e.g.Adelaide Medical School, Adelaide Nursing School, Adelaide Dental School and School of Public health) who have different bodies of knowledge and perspectives on the topic enhancing cross-disciplinary interactions as most often applicable to real world health problems.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the principles and processes of knowledge translation
    2. Employ strategies to identify and prioritise health problems and opportunities for change
    3. Appraise current health practices to determine areas of deficit and need for new innovations
    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the design and innovation process to develop new solutions to health problems
    5. Develop frameworks to implement solutions
    6. Demonstrate an understanding and apply alternative study designs to the evaluation of successful implementation
    7. Display communication and collaborative skills working in small groups to apply the knowledge translation process to a specific health problem
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2-6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1-7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6,7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no set textbook for this course. All resources, including links to journal articles and reading lists, will be disseminated via Canvas.

    Resource impact:
    Access to flexible teaching spaces is required to run the seminars, to accommodate large and small group teaching. Depending on number of students enrolled, casual teaching budget will be required for group discussion facilitation and assessment marking. Articulate Story Line for the creation of online resources for this course will be required, hence individual licenses for course coordinators. Access to audio-visual learning studio and technical support to assist with development of on-line resources for teaching purposes may also be required.
    Recommended Resources
    N/A
    Online Learning
    The primary means of communication outside of formal contact hours will be via Canvas. Announcements and discussion boards will be the main method of communicating with the student cohort. Course material will be supported by online resources, with recordings via Canvas. Material will be sequentially released in line with the teaching and learning activities in each week.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course will be presented as a mix of seminars and workshops and delivered in 3 hour blocks. Weekly 1.5 hour seminars (including guest speakers) will be used to introduce and illustrate the course components. Workshops (1.5 hours/week) will be conducted in small groups (SGDE), providing interactive group discussions to clarify and apply the course components form seminars and improve understanding. SGDE will also bring together students from other disciplines (e.g. from School of Medicine, School of Nursing, Computer Science) who have different bodies of knowledge and perspectives on the topic enhancing cross-disciplinary interactions as most often applicable to real world health problems.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Is a 3 unit course so the total workload (including contact and non-contact) for a 3 unit course is 156 hours.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Key topics include: • Module 1: Needs assessment of population health needs + Service mapping (identifying a priority area) • Module 2: Option appraisal (identifying potential solutions) • Module 3: Evaluation process (including feasibility and acceptability, and full evaluation to demonstrate safety, clinical effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness) • Module 4: Implementation frameworks/models • Module 5: Business case development and student presentations
    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will be placed in groups and assigned a tutor. It is envisaged that students will work on the same research problem. Supervisors will assist in applying course components including the identification and analysis of a health priority, potential solutions, and the evaluation of options followed by an implementation plan. They will also facilitate a cross-disciplinary collaborative experience. Each group will jointly prepare and present research findings (group presentation), but each student will prepare separate research reports (final report).
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Task Type Weighting Course Learning outcomes
    Quizzes Summative 10% 1-4
    Reflective journal Summative 15% 1, 2
    Group presentation Summative 25% 1-7
    Final report Summative 50% 1-7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    N/A
    Assessment Detail
    Quizzes: Each student will be required to complete short quiz online, testing students’ understanding of concepts addressed in the course- 10% weighting.

    Reflective journal: Students will be required to individually complete a 1,000 word report describing briefly the needs assessment process taken and option appraisal reflecting on how their learning journey can be demonstrated- 15% weighting.

    Group presentation: Groups will give a presentation to students and guest speakers in which they present how they applied the course components to their priority area and their research findings- 25% weighting

    Final report: Students will individually submit a 3,000 word report on their research findings including background, methods, results and policy implications- 50% weighting.
    Submission
    Details will be made available on MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    This is a new course so no previous SELT data is available.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.