NURSING 7031 - Foundations of Critical Care

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course introduces the advanced practice nurse to the provision of care in the critical care setting. The concepts of assessment of the critically ill patient and the initial prioritising of care will be explored. The nursing and medical science related to the cardiac and pulmonary systems will be discussed in detail. The theoretical concepts and knowledge gained will enable the advanced practice nurse to engage in discussions regarding the principles of critical care nursing. It will have both theoretical and clinical components supported by classroom teaching. Students will also be expected to complete a range of clinical competencies throughout the course.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code NURSING 7031
    Course Foundations of Critical Care
    Coordinating Unit School of Nursing
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 5 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions Available to M.NSc and G.DipNurSc students only
    Course Description This course introduces the advanced practice nurse to the provision of care in the critical care setting. The concepts of assessment of the critically ill patient and the initial prioritising of care will be explored. The nursing and medical science related to the cardiac and pulmonary systems will be discussed in detail. The theoretical concepts and knowledge gained will enable the advanced practice nurse to engage in discussions regarding the principles of critical care nursing. It will have both theoretical and clinical components supported by classroom teaching. Students will also be expected to complete a range of clinical competencies throughout the course.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Iain Everett

    Course Coordinators:

    Iain Everett
    Phone: +61 8 8313 4308
    Email: iain.everett@adelaide.edu.au

    Catrina Walker
    Phone: +61 8 313 1847
    Email: catrina.walker@adelaide.ed.au

    Julia Muller Spiti
    Phone: +61 8 8313 6284
    Email : julia.mullerspiti@adelaide.edu.au

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Recognise the signs of cardio-respiratory distress; and differentially diagnoses potential causes based on history-taking and clinical assessment.

    2. Analyse and interpret diagnostic tests and monitoring used to assess the adequacy of the cardio-respiratory systems.

    3. Discuss the aetiology and pathophysiology of common cardio-respiratory disorders potentially resulting in cardio-respiratory failure.

    4. identify the priorities and formulate an effective nursing care plan to manage a patient with the potential to, or is experiencing cardio-respiratory distress.

    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the indications, rationales, setup, operation, application, monitoring, and troubleshooting required for managing a patient requiring technology to optimise their cardio-respiratory condition.

    6. Plan, implement and evaluate holistic plans of care in collaboration with the health care team

    7. Identify and evaluate the current clinical issues in critical care nursing and considers the implications for your clinical area

    8. Identify, critically appraise and integrate current evidence based guidelines and consensus statements to inform competent clinical practice




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1 - 8
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 4 - 8
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    6 - 8
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4, 6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6 - 8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Prescribed texts

    Aitken, L Marshall, A & Chaboyer, W 2015, ACCCN’s critical care nursing, 3rd edn, Mosby Elsevier, Sydney.

    OR

    Curtis K, and Ramsden C 2016, Emergency and Trauma Care for Nurses and Paramedics. 2nd edn, Elsevier, Sydney.

    AND

    Talley, NJ & O’Connor, S 2018, Clinical examination: a systematic guide to physical diagnosis, 8th edn, Churchill/Livingstone, Elsevier, Sydney.

    AND

    Wesley, K 2017, Huszar’s: ECG and 12-Lead Interpretation, rev. 5th edn, Elsevier



    Recommended Resources
    Reading lists, web-links, library resources, essay writing guides, study guides, referencing guides, TURNITIN



    Online Learning
    • Use of MyUni, Articulate Storyline for resource materials / lectures
    • Use of announcements, discussion boards, quizzes, lecture recordings, external web-links
    • Materials will be made available during the semester



  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course will be delivered through a blended learning mode:

    Up to five hours face-to-face sessions per week (on-campus) including: a blend of lectures and tutorials utilising the principles of; ‘Problem-Based Learning’.

    Lectures
    The lecture locations will be made available on the MyUni website. Articulate storyline Lectures/office Mix will be available on the MyUni Canvas course to facilitate students preparation for specific weeks, and therefore students are required to review these reosurces prior to attending class.

    Reading
    There are several prescribed texts for this course and an online reading list that will be made available on MyUni in the Canvas course. The readings have been carefully chosen. The required and recommended readings have been selected to optimise knowledge on the topic and so that they will continue to be of use after graduating.

    Clinical Practice and Skill Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge acquisition with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical hours in their specialty setting during the semester.



    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements. The delivery mode of this course is mainly face-to-face lectures and tutorials on campus (up to five hours contact per week). Although attendance is not compulsory in this course, students are strongly encouraged to attend the classes. Many of the lectures and tutorials presented in this course will involve problem-based learning using real-life case studies and will have a close link to your clinical specialty.

    Reading
    There are several required texts for this course. The online reading will be made available via Canvas course on MyUni. However you are strongly advised to research and read widely each topic in this course. You are expected to invest about 24 hours per week of study to successfully complete this course.

    It is recommended that you plan your time commitment to the course at the beginning of the semester. This includes all study activities, attendance at lectures / tutorials, readings and assessments; some weeks it will be more and others less.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The course content will include the following:

    WEEK         TOPIC
    1 Cardiovascular anatomy & physiology
    Anti-arrhythmic pharmacology
    2 Rhythm monitoring; Sinus & Atrial arrhythmias
    Junctional & Ventricular arrhythmias
    3 Atrio-ventricular blocks
    Cardiac pacing
    4 12-lead ECG interpretation
    Axis; bundle branch & fascicular blocks
    5 Differentiation of broad complex tachycardias
    Other ECG findings
    6 Acute Coronary Syndromes
    Heart Failure
    7 Haemodynamic monitoring
    Shock states
    8 Inotropes & vasoactive pharmacology
    Massive Transfusion
    9 Hypertensive crisis
    Vascular emergencies        
    10 Respiratory anatomy & physiology
    Respiratory assessment; monitoring & diagnostics
    11 Acute respiratory failure
    Common respiratory disorders
    12 Oxygen therapy
    Non-invasive & Invasive ventilation
    13 UWSD insertion & management
    Pain, analgesia & procedural sedation
    Specific Course Requirements
    Clinical Practice and Skill Acquisition
    This course supplements theoretical knowledge acquisition with field based learning. Students are required to complete clinical skills and work a minimum of 300 clinical hours in their specialty setting during the semester.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    It is our endeavour to have Small Group Discovery (SGDE) experiences for many of our tutorial based exercises during our face to face time with students. Groups will be allocated to work together on clinical scenarios and problems that will be explored for solutions/actions that reflect evidence based care, professional team work and best practice.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME
    Search Strategy                    Formative       NGP                  3, 7, 8
    Annotated Bibliography Summative 30% 7, 8
    Essay Summative 30% 1 - 8
    Written Exam Summative 40% 1 - 5, 7, 8
    Clinical Skills Diary Summative NGP 1 - 8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    It is recommended that students closely follow the guidelines provided in the School Manual and the School Style and Referencing Guide all assessments required in this course, as course coordinators strictly follow these guidelines when marking students’ work.
    All assessment in this course must be attempted and submitted in order to satisfactorily complete this course. Where assessments items are not satisfactorily attempted and/or completed, final grades will be withheld.


    Assessment Detail

    Search Strategy – Formative (NGP): 1000 words. Assessment 1 is designed as preparation for Assessment 2 & 3. It is early in the semester so that you can receive feedback on your work before handing in your Annotated Bibliography and final Essay.
    It is the detailed description of the search strategy that you have created in order to identify current and relevant references in your topic of choice.

    Discuss the recent advances (within the last 10 years) that have occurred in the assessment and management of one of the following:
    Shocked states – Choose one type
    • Cardiogenic
    • Hypovolaemic
    • Distributive – septic, anaphylactic or neurogenic
    • Obstructive – Pneumothorax, Pulmonary Embolism and Tamponade

    These are broad topics, and you may wish to focus on one particular aspect of these.
    Once you have made your selection:
    • Identify the topic chosen and provide a brief paragraph which situates the topic, providing background, to assist in the development of the introduction for your final essay.
    Your search strategy must be referenced with primary and secondary sources about searching the literature.

    Anotated Bibliography Summative (30%): 1750 words. Using your search strategy from the first assessment, identify 10 of the most relevant articles on the topic and familiarise yourself with their content.
    Out of the 10 choose 5 and write an annotated bibliography for each justifying your choice after each Annotated bibliography based on sample, methodology, clinical context, etc..
    1. Bibliography list of the 10 articles (not in the word count)
    2. Annotated Bibliography – 5 articles - (200-250 words) and justification for inclusion (max 150 words).

    Essay – Summative (30%): 2000 words. In Assessment 3 you will use the Search Strategy and the Annotated bibliography to write your Essay.

    Subject: Discuss the recent advances (within the last 10 years) that have occurred in the Assessment and management of one of the following:
    Shocked states – Choose one type
    • Cardiogenic
    • Hypovolaemic
    • Distributive – septic, anaphylactic or neurogenic
    • Obstructive – Pneumothorax, Pulmonary Embolism and Tamponade
    These are broad topics, and you may wish to focus on one particular aspect of these.

    In your discussion you must include the following headings:
    • pathology/ pathophysiology
    • assessment
    • management

    Written Exam – Summative (40% - grade of 50% or more is required to complete the course): The examination will consist of a combination of multiple choice questions and short answer questions. Students will be expected to be able to analyse patient situations. The examination will be two hours in duration and will examine the theory taught in Foundations of Critical Care.
     
    Clinical Skills Diary - Summative (NGP). The assessment of skills will occur throughout the semester. Students will be assessed by the critical care registered nurses and clinical titleholders, with whom they work. Please refer to the information provided in the Clinical skills Diaries regarding skills assessment criteria.

    It is essential that students, who do not have exposure to a particular skill, negotiate with the coordinator within enough time to arrange for clinical experience to occur. The diaries will be graded Pass or Fail.



    Submission
    Assessments, unless otherwise stated in your Study guide, are to be submitted electronically via Assignments in MyUni on the due date identified in this Study guide. Instructions for assignment submission are available for all students under Tutorials at www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/.

    Turnitin is used to submit all assignments in this course. Turnitin is a plagiarism software tool that enables the student to identify any
    matching text before final submission.

    An assessment submitted via MyUni must be submitted as a .doc, .docx or .rtf file. If submitting a PowerPoint presentation for marking, the .ppt or .pptx must be submitted as .pdf file. It is also important to submit your file under your name, such as surname.firstname. MyUni stamps all the other details against your filename once you submit your assessment.

    Clinical Skills Diaries should be submitted in person to the students' respective Course Coordinator by 1630hrs on or before the due date.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Best aspects of this course 
    Lectures and the articulated lectures online
    Teaching method is good
    Huge wealth of topics relevant to my practice
    The lectureres make learning the content interactive and fun
    Very hepful with my role in emergency.
    Information is relevant and the content pushes us to learn best practices. It also is content relevant to all critical care environments which encourages each speciality to learn about the other.
    Contact hours, combined learning with ED and cardiac students. Two of the lecturers have current practice knowledge making the content more relevant
    Very relevant topics, well presented mostly
    Weekly face to face lectures.

    Areas for improvement
    Just housekeeping, wrong lecture times printed, calendar incorrect
    Sharing content around some weeks are very content heavy and others are light
    More relevant assignments. The assignments could have been more related to the lecture content.  


  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.