HIST 2092 - History of Crime & Punishment in England & Europe

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course has three principal strands for study: the meaning and incidence of 'crime'; the administration of justice via courts and trial procedures; and penal policy. These areas will be studied over several centuries, and particularly 1500-1900, a crucial period in British and European history because it encompassed the Protestant Reformation, several bursts of state formation, the transformation of the 'public sphere', and the development of urban-industrial societies. All these 'events' had a considerable impact on mentalities, communities, and cultures, with their corresponding determinations as to desirable social norms and the prosecution and punishment of deviance. They were also informed by the principal legal cultures in Europe: Roman or 'civil law', church law, and common law. Students will be encouraged to consider all these factors against two prevailing historiographical issues. First, what were the social agencies for change in labelling crime and dealing with criminals? And second, how should we interpret the transformation in criminal law and its enforcement which took place over the period: was it 'civilising reform' or 'an economy of industrial discipline'?

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 2092
    Course History of Crime & Punishment in England & Europe
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible HIST 2082
    Course Description This course has three principal strands for study: the meaning and incidence of 'crime'; the administration of justice via courts and trial procedures; and penal policy. These areas will be studied over several centuries, and particularly 1500-1900, a crucial period in British and European history because it encompassed the Protestant Reformation, several bursts of state formation, the transformation of the 'public sphere', and the development of urban-industrial societies. All these 'events' had a considerable impact on mentalities, communities, and cultures, with their corresponding determinations as to desirable social norms and the prosecution and punishment of deviance. They were also informed by the principal legal cultures in Europe: Roman or 'civil law', church law, and common law. Students will be encouraged to consider all these factors against two prevailing historiographical issues. First, what were the social agencies for change in labelling crime and dealing with criminals? And second, how should we interpret the transformation in criminal law and its enforcement which took place over the period: was it 'civilising reform' or 'an economy of industrial discipline'?
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Philip Ritson

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. display an understanding of the key themes in the history of crime and punishment in England and Europe;

    2. exhibit critical and analytical skills appropriate to upper-level university students, including the ability to read sources
    critically;

    3. display eveloped research and communication skills relevant to the study of the humanities;

    4. bring historical knowledge to bear upon the understanding of present-day issues associated with crime and punishment.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2,4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2,3,4
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Course readings and any material that must be read before each tutorial will be made available on MyUni.
    Online Learning
    Please consult the Myuni pages for this course regularly for updates and additional resources. The Myuni pages for the course also include links to very useful websites and will be used for e-submission of some assignments. The university has access to databases of scholarly journals directly related to this course and has a rich collection of British history books so students will have no trouble locating sources upon which to base a research project or essay.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Face-to-face teaching for this course begins with lectures in Week One. There will be two hours of lectures each week and one
    tutorial.  Attendance at lectures is strongly encouraged because they provide both essential subject matter for the course and
    the context for tutorial discussions. If you are unable to attend a given lecture or wish to review the material, the recorded lectures will be available via Myuni. The recordings are designed, however, to provide a back-up to (rather than substitute for) attendance in person.  Some of the video material shown in the course may not be available in the library or on Myuni so it is important to attend so you don’t miss its invaluable (and often entertaining) perspective.

    Tutorials and Workshops
    Along with the lectures, the weekly tutorials comprise the core of this subject. You are expected to attend your tutorial each week, having read the material in the Course Reader and text book for that topic. Readings are provided in the Course Reader and text book for the tutorial topics, which you are required to read and think deeply about before class and then to discuss in class. 

    Tutorials: tutorials for this, as for all History courses, are your forum and are designed to provide an interactive, collaborative learning experience. They provide an opportunity to share your ideas about the issues raised by the readings, to hear others’ ideas and to ask questions. In other words, they are an opportunity to partake in real intellectual debate about the ideas and events which shaped our world and current attitudes to crime and punishment: debates which are fundamental to both historical study and developing confidence and communication skills which will serve you well long after you leave university. When reading
    for your tutorial, keep the “Discussion Questions” in mind because they will provide the structure for our discussion. We may or may not discuss these questions in tutorials but they provide a good indication of significant issues associated with each topic. Please note that participation in tutorial discussions and workshops constitutes 10% of your final mark. You must attend tutorials regularly, demonstrate adequate preparation for them and contribute to the discussion (see assessment information for more details).

    Tutorial Attendance: Participation in tutorials is compulsory and you must attend at least 80% of them if you expect to pass the course (unless medical documentation is provided). If you cannot attend your tutorial or workshop, please let the tutor know in advance – not only is this good manners but it might be possible to ‘make-up’ the class at another time later in the week.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The time commitment for this course is a standard minimum 156 hours, during over the semester. This comprises formal contact time:
    lectures, tutorials and individual study, research, reading and writing time and time spent online. The contact hours are up to: 2 hours of lectures per week and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week. Thus, it is expected that students will spend three contact hours on the
    course and a minimum of seven hours in individual study per week. Naturally, though, this will vary. In general, your weekly workload
    includes attendance at two lectures and one tutorial/workshop per week, carrying out the weekly readings, otherwise preparing to participate in your tutorials, and working on your assessment tasks. Please note that it is the student’s responsibility to check the assessment tasks and organise their time effectively over the course of the semester.
    Learning Activities Summary
    A detailed lecture and tutorial progam will be available at the beginning of the semester when the Course Guide is Posted on MyUni
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Tutorials will be broken into three groups.  Each group will select a point in time at which the punishment for a crime changes and prepare a group presentation explaining why that penalty changed.  The presentation will be made in tutorials after the mid-semester break.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Critical Review (1,500 words)  25%

    Research Essay (3000 words)  40%

    Small Group Discovery Exercise Presentation  5%

    Class Test  20%

    Tutorial Participation  10%
    Assessment Detail
    Critical Review:
    You are required to submit a 1,500-word review of a book extract or journal article that will be made available on MyUni.  The principal aim of this exercise is to encourage the critical reading of the textits entirety.

    In the review you will be expected to:
    briefly explain the subject-matter and principal conclusions of the text;
    discuss the ‘approach’ of the author (i.e. what he/she intended to do and how
    the work is informed by particular ideas and/or previous work in the
    area);
    evaluate the text's contribution to knowledge in the area.



    Research Essay:
    Choose any of the essay questions: there is one per tutorial topic, as listed below. You will be able to begin researching the subject from the bibliography listed for that week. However, this is a research essay so you must move beyond the reading list provided. You must do more than merely summarise the available secondary literature. You will need to consult and evaluate primary sources and present your own, informed, opinion. Assessment will be based upon your research skills, your
    interpretation, and how convincingly you argue your case.

    The esdsay is worth 40% of the grade for the course, it is essential that you begin work on the essay early in the semester.

    Primary Sources for the essay: a starting point

    British Parliamentary Papers (Shannon, Ireland: Irish UP). (Hundreds of volumes, including 19th- century parliamentary reports on the administration of criminal law and policing.)British Trials, 1600-1900 English criminal trials, mainly for the 18th and 19th centuries.
    Cobbett,William (ed.). A Complete Collection of State Trials (London: 1812), many volumes of important criminal trials (available via University Library catalogue and Justis database).
    The English Reports (Edinburgh, 1900-32), 178 volumes. Includes reprints of virtually all published English trial reports as compiled by contemporary lawyers, but mainly civil cases, and hard to use unless you know what you are looking for (available via University Library catalogue and HeinOnline database).
    Old Bailey Proceedings: Pamphlets on trials at the Old Bailey, mainly 18th century, and compiled for sale to the public (available online at http://www.oldbaileyonline.org). 

    Class Test:
    There will be a 50 minute test held in the final lecture session. Students will be required to answer four or five questions with answers of about half a page to a page in length. The questions will be based largely upon the tutorial topics, although some material covered in lectures will be included. You will not be permitted to write an answer on the topic you have already covered in your course work essay.

    Tutorial Assessment:
    Weekly tutorials form the core of this course and your attendance is compulsory. Please note that assessment of your preparation for participation in class discussion constitutes 10% of your final grade. In order to gain those marks you must attend tutorials regularly, demonstrate adequate preparation and be willing to contribute to the discussion. You must also help to lead the discussion for the tutorial which relates to your Research Essay. The criteria for assessing tutorial participation are listed below.

    Fail: You have said nothing each week, or you have only once or twice participated. Note that attendance is not part of this grade, you must have read for the topic and contributed to the discussion.

    Pass: You read the “essential reading” material each week and contributed a few words to most discussions on the basis of your reading.

    Credit: You read the “essential reading” material each week and participated regularly in discussions, demonstrating an effort to come to terms with the topic.

    Distinction: You read the “essential reading” material and participated substantially each week. You demonstrated a conscientious effort to come to terms with the topic every week and relate it to the course as a
    whole.

    High Distinction: You read the “essential reading” material each week and contributed substantially to the discussion. You
    worked hard to integrate your reading for tutorials and lectures into anoverall understanding of what each topic was about, and how it related to the course as a whole. You made informed and thoughtful contributions which helped others in the class to understand the topic.

    Please note that your contribution to the discussion is expected to be informed by the assigned readings. Students who are vociferous each weekbut whose participation is based upon their general knowledge rather than careful reading of the documents and texts cannot expect to receivea high mark.
    Submission
    Online Submission of Assignments (e-submission) via MyUni. 

    Extensions
    Students wishing to apply for an extension need to submit the relevant form available at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html to the school office at least 5 days prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Exceptions to the Policy
    If one of the following criteria is met, an informal extension can be organised with the course coordinator or tutor:small extension – 2 days or less;
    assessment item is worth 20% or less;
    student is registered with the Disability Office (need to attach a Disability Access Plan – DAP).
    All work submitted late without an extension will incur a penalty of 2% per day including weekends.
    Normally written work will be returned a fortnight after submission.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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