COMMGMT 4006 - Management, Information & Data

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

In this course, students are introduced to sense-making and security-conscious approaches to data and information, including sourcing primary and secondary data, analysing it, and presenting the results. They will also learn the mechanics, the security principles, and some of the analytical business methods and uses for data manipulation, analysis, and management using spreadsheets. This course provides students with critical foundations in data and information management that are required of employees by government, organisations, and small businesses, and are vitally important to the self-employed; and gives a solid foundation for future studies in big data, analytics, and business intelligence. This course incorporates research (with real clients) and teamwork as foundations for graduate careers. This is a partner course with Business Data Requirements, however both courses work well as stand-alone courses. It is possible to take these courses together, separately, or to only take one of the two.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code COMMGMT 4006
    Course Management, Information & Data
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 36 hours
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Course Description In this course, students are introduced to sense-making and security-conscious approaches to data and information, including sourcing primary and secondary data, analysing it, and presenting the results. They will also learn the mechanics, the security principles, and some of the analytical business methods and uses for data manipulation, analysis, and management using spreadsheets.
    This course provides students with critical foundations in data and information management that are required of employees by government, organisations, and small businesses, and are vitally important to the self-employed; and gives a solid foundation for future studies in big data, analytics, and business intelligence. This course incorporates research (with real clients) and teamwork as foundations for graduate careers.
    This is a partner course with Business Data Requirements, however both courses work well as stand-alone courses. It is possible to take these courses together, separately, or to only take one of the two.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Cate Jerram

    Dr Cate Jerram
    09.03 Nexus 10
    #34757
    cate.jerram@adelaide.edu.au
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/cate.jerram

    Teaching Team
    Dr Daowei Sun
    Email daowei.sun@adelaide.edu.au
    Work Phone 088313
    Office Location: 09.04 Nexus 10
    Office Hours: Flexible, email for appointments.

    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/daowei.sun
              Dr Larissa Statsenko
    Email larissa.statsenko@adelaide.edu.au
    Work phone 08 8313
    Office location: 09.?? Nexus 10
    Office hours: Flexible, email for appointments.

    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/larissa.statsenko




    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    This course meets weekly for 3 hour seminars on Thursdays from 1:00pm – 4:00pm.

    Venue: Nexus10, Room 207 (Computer Suite 4, level 2).
    Important – there will sometimes be a change of venue, so always check the course website (MyUni) and announcements, in case you need to go somewhere else.

    NOTE: there is an expectation that members of the course will participate actively in the online components of the course, and that MyUni will be accessed (asynchronously) at least 2-3 times per week in addition to physical attendance at class.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1. Establish and use criteria to: categorise the legal, ethical, and quality status of data, information, and sources; designate them for appropriate use; and present/communicate the findings effectively.
    2. Source and deal appropriately with primary and secondary data, information, and knowledge respectively, using the applicable methods, tools, storage, security, and management techniques.
    3. Use spreadsheets and workbooks (Excel) for effective organisation, management, analysis, and presentation, of data and information.
    4. Communicate with diverse individuals, teams, and clients, to conduct, manage, and present data- and information-based consulting and research projects.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1 - 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1 - 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1 - 4
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    1. Your presence in class and off-site in investigative activities.
    2. Use of all prerequisite resources provided in MyUni – before arriving in class.
    3. Those resources students are directed to source (find or create) and share.

    Note:
    No textbook will be used in this course.
    MS Excel; NVivo11Pro; Textpad; Internet; Server space (all provided by the university)
    Student research will determine text resource needs, & DRMC will be arranged on an ongoing basis with Library, to resource student selections (approved by Course Coordinator) each week.
    The major resources required are primarily: intelligence, imagination, sense of humour and integrity. Commitment also helps.
    Recommended Resources
    1. Everything provided on the MyUni site is strongly recommended as a great (required) starting point.
    2. Quality resources you find or create yourself and share with your classmates.
    Online Learning
    This course is built upon an engagement and self-directed learning pedagogy – almost all didactic and information-based ‘resources’ are provided online. In-class learning and off-site activities are where the ‘rubber hits the road’ – and are dependent upon students having worked through the necessary online resources.

    IF YOU HAVE TROUBLE ACCESSING the MyUni site for this course, please contact the Course Coordinator (CC) Dr Cate Jerram immediately! (Remember to give your official name, your preferred name, and your student id#.) Note: An enrolment into MyUni takes 24 hours to take effect, so - the sooner the better!
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    MIaD is conducted in intensive mode and uses Blended Learning (combined face-to-face and online) flipped classroom approach. It is a problem-based & research-based course, incorporating individual and team learning and projects (formative as well as summative), as it is very much geared to developing graduates capable of being independent and inter-dependent employees and/or successfully self-employed.

    There will be an element of gamification. Class time will predominantly be workshop (particularly communication skills, but also software) and will also include project-based participation and debates. Research and problem-solving will incorporate both self-directed and team-based learning. The course is designed to build students from early simulation games to end-of-course engagement with workplace (mentored) client projects, using workshop and games as well as Just-in-Time Discovery learning to acquire needed knowledge and skills, when and as required, to meet client needs.

    Projects conducted well should give students real projects for their professional demonstration portfolio, as well as higher-order communication skills; analysis skills; and data- and information-management knowledge and skill-sets.

    This means that:
    • participation in face-to-face classes is vital
    • participation in online and off-site activities is crucial
    • participating in and developing a community of practice is not only important now, but will ideally start to build a network of collegial peers who will continue as a support network for life.
    BLENDED LEARNING
    Class time will be predominantly workshop, so any 'lectures' will mostly be online (pre-recorded core concepts); students will be working in wikis and/or other collaborative tools; online communication and research tools will be taught and used; student-developed artefacts will be created and showcased; MS Excel, Textpad, and NVivoPro11 (all provided) will be used.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course has a 3 hour per week face-to-face component, and requires multiple (asynchronous) online engagements each week.

    Note: The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester) to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies. This means that you are expected to commit approximately 9 hours (for a three-unit course) or 13 hours (for a four-unit course) of private study outside of your regular classes.
    Learning Activities Summary
    MIaD will be delivered in 13 weekly seminars. Each seminar will commence online and be concluded in class. For more precise details, see MyUni.
    Each session will comprise communications skills practicum, software review workshop, individual & team research and problem-solving activities, class discussion and debate, and/or student presentations.
    Week13 will include an in-class reflective test.
    MS Excel and the basics of NVivo11Pro will be taught primarily online and reviewed in workshop.
    Team skills will be taught online and in workshop.
    Communication skills will be taught online and in workshop.
        

    Week

    Seminar Focus and Topics (Note: not set in concrete... order may change!)
    Week 01 - Groundwork & IMS Project Design 1
    - Theory of Data & Information
    - Intro to Spreadsheets & MS Excel
    Week 02 - Transnational & Boundary-less nature of IMS
    - Data, Information, Privacy, Security, Law & Ethics
    - IMS Project Design 2
    - Sensemaking Theory 1
    Week 03 - Business, Data, IT, IS and IM.
    - Data sourcing and collection
    - IMS Project Design 3
    Week 04 - Business, Data, IT, IS and IM 2
    - Data management & storage
    - IMS Project Management & Maintenance
    - Sensemaking Theory 2
    Week 05 - Business, Data, IT, IS and IM 3
    - Data analysis 1.
    - IMS Project Management & Maintenance 2
    Week 06 - Business, Data, IT, IS and IM 4
    - Data analysis 2.
    - IMS Project Progress and Development/Redesign
    - Sensemaking Theory 3
    Week 07 - Data analysis 3.
    - IMS Project Flexibility & Troubleshooting
    - Data, Information, Privacy, Security, Law & Ethics 2
    Week 08 - Data analysis 4.
    - IMS Project Flexibility & Troubleshooting 2
    - Sensemaking Theory 4
    Week 09 - Data analysis 5.
    - IMS Project Crisis Management
    - Sensemaking Theory 5
    Week 10 Synthesis 1:
      - data, information, knowledge
      - theory (sense-making)
      - theory and application
    Week 11 - Data, Information, Privacy, Security, Law & Ethics 3
    - Professional Presentation of Information
    - Synthesis 2
    Week 12 - In-class review of presentations for clients
    Specific Course Requirements
    • Students must pass the Assessment Task “in-class reflective report” to be able to pass the course.
    • Participation in both face-to-face and online activities is critical and therefore is required.
    • Any need to deviate from any of the stated expectations must be negotiated with the Lecturer-in-Charge.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    This course is designed along the core principles of the SGDE. Graduates of this course must be capable of working as effectively in teams as they do as individuals (and vice-versa), and students will be taught teamwork skills. As this course is part of the Information Management and Systems stream, it is critical that Graduates of this course are capable of Discovery Learning to be able to keep pace (both during studies and during their graduate careers) with rapid technological and information changes in a fast-moving and globalised world. Students are taught self-directed learning skills as a core part of this course, and are similarly taught networking and collaboration skills to start developing their professional community of practice.

    Teamwork is required. Collaboration is encouraged. Collusion is unacceptable.
    Peer Review and support is required.
    Critical Analysis (of own work and each other's) is absolutely necessary.

    Ideally, if a Community of Practice is genuinely developed during this course, it will help each of you create a network that can build to sustain and support you throughout your entire career.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Collaborative /
    Individual
     Weighting  Word Count / Time

    Due Date 

    Learning Outcomes
    #1 Resource Compilation TBA 20% TBA ◾Draft: week 3
    ◾Final: week 9
    1, 2 (& 3, 4)
    #2 Analytical Worksheets (Excel) TBA 20% TBA ◾Draft: week 5
    ◾Final: week 11
    3 (& 1,2,4)
    #3 Client Project (staged) Individual & team 40% TBA ◾Week 12 1 - 4
    #4 In-class reflective report (Test) Individual 20% 1 hour ◾Project Design: Week 3
    ◾Raw findings:1 Week 4
    ◾Self & peer assessment: Week 5
    ◾Raw findings 2: Week 6 ◾Spreadsheet: Week 8
    ◾Analysis: Week 10
    ◾Client presentation: Week 12
    ◾Self & peer assessment 2: Week 12
    1 - 4
    Total 100%


    Assessment Related Requirements
    Please note: students must pass the final Assessment Task (Reflective Report / Test) in Week 13. Any student failing to gain a mark of 10/20 or higher in the final Test will receive a final course grade of 48 Fail.

    The critical things to note about the assessments in this course are that:
    • they are very interdependent - built on the concept of community of scholars and peer support. ie: if you miss deadlines or mess up, your colleagues suffer as well as you;
    • the assessment activities all contribute to an actual research project as well as to your (and your peers') future career strengths (whatever career paths you follow).
    Therefore:
    • be timely - meet deadlines;
    • but be sane - when you can only do it by half-killing yourself - negotiate;
    • collaborate (note: acknowledged collaboration is a powerful professional and academic strength; Unacknowledged collaboration is called 'collusion' and is seen as cheating);
    • do your best - not just for your own work, but when in investing in others' growth;
    • be excited about your learning and growth and about your peers' learning and growth - it is exciting!
    • and have fun (if you don't learn to enjoy it now, it will always be 'unpleasantly hard work' rather than deeply satisfying and rewarding endeavour);
    • know that it DOES get easier - every piece you do makes the next one easier; every impossible-to-understand article you read makes the next one more possible and more readable - and your Resource Compilations will help you scale that wall faster and more easily than you can expect... the collaboration with your peers will make a world of difference. Therefore (again) your feedback to one another is critical!
    Assessment Detail
    Wherever possible, assessment details remain consistent but due to the emergent design nature of the course can sometimes change. Any and all changes will always be posted in the Assessment Folder in MyUni and in the Announcements, with accompanying Email.

    Submission Dates & Times are listed under each Assessment Task.
    Marking Rubrics and greater detail on assessment tasks will be available in MyUni in the Assessments folder.

    #1 Resource Compilation - 20%, (CLOs 1, 2 [& 3, 4])

    • Draft due by start of seminar Week 3
    • Final due by start of seminar Week 9
    The goal of this assignment is to accumulate a number of quality resources (annotated) which supports your knowledge of the field generally, and your information needs for your client project specifically. Done well, this Resource Compilation will be useful throughout your whole degree program, and probably afterwards as well.
    Your draft Compilation will receive feedback and a ‘temporary’ indicative mark out of 20. This mark is replaced by the mark you receive for your final submission.
    Resources to be compiled and annotated include assigned readings and self-selected readings (annotated). Other resources are also encouraged including links to books, videos, YouTube clips, etc. Full details are on MyUni.Rubric will be posted on MyUni after negotiation with class.

    #2 Analytical Worksheets (Excel) - 20%, (CLO 3 [& 1, 2, 4])

    • Draft due by start of seminar Week 5
    • Final due by start of seminar Week 11
    Students will be assigned analytical tasks which must be accomplished in Excel. Competency in use of the software is required to pass the course, but all marks higher than a pass are graded on analytical use and quality.
    Again, feedback and a temporary grade are given for the early draft. Final marks overwrite the original grade after the final submission is marked.
    Full details and Rubric will be posted on MyUni after negotiation with class.

    #3 Client Project (staged) - 40%, (CLOs 1, 2 , 3 , 4)

    • Project Design due: Week 3
    • Raw findings 1 due: Week 4
    • Self & peer assessment due: Week 5
    • Raw findings 2 due: Week 6
    • Spreadsheet due: Week 8
    • Analysis due: Week 10
    • Client presentation due: Week 12
    • Self & peer assessment 2 due: Week 12
    This project is graded in components as the project is built. The project will be planned together in class, and supervised by academics, but students will be communicating with clients in the field (with a research mentor), conducting their own primary and secondary research both individually and in teams, and reporting back in class. Students will not be permitted to progress stages until they have passed required previous stages.
    Please be aware – as this assessment task involves REAL CLIENTS in organisations, there will NOT be much flexibility around deadlines and KPIs.
    Nevertheless... Rubric will be posted on MyUni after (some) negotiation with class.

    #4 In-class reflective report (Test) - 20%, (CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

    • Due date: Week 13, class time
    • Duration: (1 hour - time to be negotiated)
    This report will be written under closed-book test conditions. A minimum of 50% (10 marks) must be achieved in this report, to pass the course. The report will require reflective self-analysis and team-evaluation of the client project. Full details and Rubric will be posted on MyUni after negotiation with class.
    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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