CHIN 3013 - Understanding Chinese Language for Chinese Speakers

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

This course is intended for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin studying Modern Standard Chinese in Australian context. The course aims to introduce students to the essentials of the Chinese language so as to enhance their proficiency in the practical use of the language in the Australian context. It focuses on important aspects of the language including its writing system, historical development, and its social and regional variances. Topics covered in this course include Chinese among world languages, Chinese in China and overseas, Romanisation schemes, the phonological, lexical and syntactic features of Chinese, the historical development of Chinese, reform of the Chinese language, analysis of traditional & simplified scripts and teaching Chinese as a foreign language in Australia.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CHIN 3013
    Course Understanding Chinese Language for Chinese Speakers
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites Native or near native Chinese language proficiency (including Chinese dialects)
    Assumed Knowledge Completion of junior secondary school or above in China, other Chinese speaking countries or regions, or equivalent with native or near native Chinese language proficiency (including Chinese dialects)
    Course Description This course is intended for native or near-native speakers of Mandarin studying Modern Standard Chinese in Australian context. The course aims to introduce students to the essentials of the Chinese language so as to enhance their proficiency in the practical use of the language in the Australian context. It focuses on important aspects of the language including its writing system, historical development, and its social and regional variances. Topics covered in this course include Chinese among world languages, Chinese in China and overseas, Romanisation schemes, the phonological, lexical and syntactic features of Chinese, the historical development of Chinese, reform of the Chinese language, analysis of traditional & simplified scripts and teaching Chinese as a foreign language in Australia.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Hong Cai

    Course Co-ordinator/Lecturer
    Dr. Hong Cai
    RM 641, Kenneth Wills Building
    Ph: +61 8 83132598
    Email: hong.cai@adelaide.edu.au


    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. acquire a sound knowledge of the basics of the Chinese language with regard to its structure, social and geographic profile
    2. understand the historical evolvement 
    3. read in and convert between the simplified and the traditional script of Chinese
    4. work with major Romanization schemes of Chinese, such as pinyin and the Wade-Giles system
    5. use major Chinese dictionaries and other resources to address language related issues
    6. understand the current situation of Chinese on the world stage and debate on the topic of reforming the Chinese language
    7. engage in collaborative work and use the Internet to solve problems encountered in practice


    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    5, 6, 7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    6, 7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    6, 7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    3, 4, 6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6, 7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    钱乃荣,2001, 《现代汉语》,江苏教育出版社;
    Reading materials provided in lectures.
    Recommended Resources
    Chao, Yuen Ren. 1968. A grammar of spoken Chinese / by Yuen Ren Chao. Berkeley: University of California Press.
    Chen, Ping. 1999. Modern Chinese: History and Sociolinguistics. Cambridge University Press.
    Gao, M. (2000). Mandarin Chinese : An introduction / Mobo C. F. Gao. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
    Hu, Yushu. 1992. Xian dai Han yu / Hu Yushu zhu bian. (增訂本, 香港第1版..; Zeng ding ben, Xianggang di 1 ban. ed.). Xianggang: San lian shu dian (Xianggang) yuo xian gong si.
    Liu, Jin & Tao, Hongyin. 2012. Chinese Under Globalization Emerging Trends in Language Use in China. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company.
    Lü, Shuxiang. 1983. Xian dai Han yu ba bai ci / Lü Shuxiang zhu bian. (香港第1版..; Xianggang di 1 ban. ed.). Xianggang: Shang wu yin shu guan (Xianggang) you xian gong si.
    Norman, Jerry. 1988. Chinese. Cambridge University Press
    Zou, Jiayan & Rujie You. 2001. Han yu yu hua ren she hui. Shanghai: Fudan University Press.
    Online Learning
    Journal articles and ebooks that the university libraries hold will be available to all students. 

    The MyUni site will be used to announce upcoming curricular and extra curricular events and host supplementary material. The site will help students and lecturers to communicate outside of class and help students prepare for lectures. 
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Classes are conducted with an interactive, student-centred approach. A topic is introduced in each lecture and further supported by discussions and problem-solving activities available online. Feedback on activity outcome will be provided to individuals and/or student groups. Discussions on Canvas will be used for Q&A about the lectures, tutorials, assessments and etc.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS
    2 x 1-hour lectures per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial per week 12 hours per semester

    WORKLOAD - SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING TOTAL HOURS
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester

    TOTAL = 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    WEEK LECTURE TOPIC
    1 Introduction: Languages in the World; Languages in China; Chinese language
    2 Introduction (continued): Chinese outside China; Influence of Chinese on Other Languages
    3 Basic Structure of Chinese: Sound, Word and Grammar
    4 Basic Structure of Chinese: Sound, Word and Grammar 
    5 Basic Structure of Chinese: Sound, Word and Grammar
    6 Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language
    7 Chinese Script (Han Zi)
    8 Reform of Chinese Language
    9 Historical Development of Chinese
    10 The Romanization of Chinese: History & Main Schemes
    11 Chinese Dictionaries from Han Dynasty to the Present Time
    12 Oral presentation

    * The learning activities are subject to change depending on circumstances.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Small group discovery is an integral part of the learning process. Techniques such as Think-Pair-Share will be used regularly in tutorials. Accumulative snow-balling techniques will be used to learn complex concepts and texts. Some worksheets and the oral presentation will be completed in small groups.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
    Worksheets Summative 20% 1-7
    Oral presentation Formative and summative 30% 1-7
    1500 word essay Summative 50% 1-7



    Assessment Detail
    Worksheets: students will be required to complete 10 weekly worksheets which are accessible on Canvas before the due dates. Each worksheet is worth 2% - 20% weighting.
    Oral presentation: students will need to deliver an oral presentation in Week 13 in small groups on a chosen topic - 30% weighting.
    1500 word essay: students will be required to write a 1500-word essay on a chosen topic - 50% weighting.
    Submission
    All assignments for this course must be submitted electronically via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.