MANAGEMT 7053 - Organisation Innovation

North Terrace Campus - Summer - 2018

Processes of change are central to organizations and have never been more topical given the commercial context of ever more competitive and demanding global markets, changing socio-political pressures and world conflicts, the large movements of people (including refugees) across borders and countries, financial crises and uncertainties, fluctuating commodity markets, fierce business competition, shorter product life cycles and increasing customer demands. A sense of time compression and the accelerating pace of life in the face of disruptive innovations and shifts in consumer behaviour all underscore the importance of being able to successfully manage ongoing change and innovation. By the end of this course students will be aware of the wide range of theories and perspectives on managing change from conventional planning frameworks to more dialogical techniques in methods, such as, appreciative inquiry. They will by knowledgeable about the human dimensions to change at an individual and group level and appreciate the importance of power and politics in making change happen within and across organizations. They will also gain a deeper conceptual and practical understanding of the dynamic and complex processes of managing change through exploring and reflecting upon a broad range case study examples and leading frameworks on managing change.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7053
    Course Organisation Innovation
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Summer
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per day over 2 weeks
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange
    Restrictions Restricted to MBA students only
    Course Description Processes of change are central to organizations and have never been more topical given the commercial context of ever more competitive and demanding global markets, changing socio-political pressures and world conflicts, the large movements of people (including refugees) across borders and countries, financial crises and uncertainties, fluctuating commodity markets, fierce business competition, shorter product life cycles and increasing customer demands. A sense of time compression and the accelerating pace of life in the face of disruptive innovations and shifts in consumer behaviour all underscore the importance of being able to successfully manage ongoing change and innovation. By the end of this course students will be aware of the wide range of theories and perspectives on managing change from conventional planning frameworks to more dialogical techniques in methods, such as, appreciative inquiry. They will by knowledgeable about the human dimensions to change at an individual and group level and appreciate the importance of power and politics in making change happen within and across organizations. They will also gain a deeper conceptual and practical understanding of the dynamic and complex processes of managing change through exploring and reflecting upon a broad range case study examples and leading frameworks on managing change.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Patrick Dawson

    The University of Adelaide Business School

    Telephone: 08 83132066

    patrick.dawson@adelaide.edu.au

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of the course students will be able to:
    1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the main concepts, models and frameworks of change management and innovation, and their practical application.
    2. Explicate the key human dimensions and drivers of change.
    3. Demonstrate the core skills of case study appraisal.
    4. Explicate the complex processes associated with change and innovation. 
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 3, 4
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 3
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Textbook details available via MyUni and in resource folder.
    Recommended Resources

    Details of additional readings are available via MyUni and in resource folder.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes


    The MBA program is largely undertaken through face-to-face class sessions to facilitate interactions between the Lecture in Charge and fellow students. Accordingly there is an expectation that you will attend all of the scheduled classes. If work commitments, illness or other circumstances require you to be absent from some classes, please inform your Lecture in Charge in advance by either phone or email so that you may discuss the topic(s) to be covered in the class session and the tasks you need to complete before the next session.

    It is your responsibility to make arrangements with the Lecture in Charge to catch up on any information that you might have missed.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The course runs over 6 alternative days in Summer School. There are 12 three hour sessions run on each of the six days. The course comprises lectures, seminars, team presentations, workshop activities, video and case study analyses and guest speakers (possible field visit). There will be a critical evaluative piece, group project work and an individual written assignment - see Learning Activities Summary for more details.

    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Session Topics Textbook Readings Assessment
    1 Introduction to Change & Innovation
    1. Read Chapter 1
    2. Prepare Case 1.1
    3. Make notes for discussion on course readings
    Amis, J.M. (2017). Understanding Organization Change and Innovation: A Conversation with Mike Tushman. Journal of Change Management, pp. 1-12.
    Hughes, M. (2017). Reflections: Studying Organizational Change Leadership as a Subfield. Journal of Change Management, pp. 1-13.
    Participation
    2 Process of Change, Creativity and Innovation
    1. Read Chapter 2
    2. Prepare Case 2.1
    3. Make notes for discussion on course readings
    Seebode, D., Jeanrenaud, S. and Bessant, J. (2012). Managing innovation for sustainability. R&D Management, 42, pp. 195-206.
    Amabile, T.M. (2012). Componential Theory of Creativity. Harvard Business School.
    Participation
    3 History of Management Thought
    1. Read Chapter 3
    2. Prepare reflective and prospective exercise p.107
    No additional readings Participation
    4 Theories of Organizational Change
    1. Chapter 4
    2. Prepare Case 4.1
    3. Make notes for discussion on course readings
    By, R.T. (2005). Organisational change management: a critical review. Journal of Change Management, 5, pp. 369-380.
    Van De Ven, A.H. and Poole, M.S. (2005). Alternative approaches for studying organizational change. Organization Studies, 26, pp. 1377-1404.
    Participation
    5 Practice of Change Management
    1. Chapter 5
    2. Prepare Case 5.1 and 5.2
    3. Make notes for discussion on readings
    Stadler, C. (2007). Four Principles of Enduring Success. Harvard Business Review, 85, pp. 62-72.
    Wessel, M. and Christensen, C.M. (2012). Surviving disruption. Harvard Business Review, 90, pp. 56-64.
    Participation
    6 Culture and Change
    1. Chapter 15
    2. Prepare Case 15.1 and 15.2
    3. Make notes for discussion on readings
    Alvesson, M. and Sveningsson, S. (2016). Changing Organizational Culture: Cultural Change Work in Progress Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, pp.40-56. Participation
    7 Human Dimension to Change
    1. Chapter 6
    2. Prepare Case 6.1 and 6.2
    3. Make notes for discussion on course readings
    Dawson, P. and Mclean, P. (2013). Miner’s tales: Stories and the storying process for understanding the collective sensemaking of employees during contested change. Group & Organization Management: An International Journal, 38, pp. 198-229. Participation
    8 Conventional Change Frameworks
    1. Chapter 7
    2. Prepare Case 7.1 and 7.2
    3. Make notes for discussion on course readings
    Burnes, B. (2004). Kurt Lewin and the planned approach to change: a re-appraisal. Journal of Management Studies, 41, pp. 977-1001.
    Kotter, J. (2012). How the most innovative companies capitalize on today's rapid-fire strategic challenges - and still make their numbers. Harvard Business Review, 90, pp. 43-58.
    Participation
    9 New Developments and Postmodern Ideas
    1. Chapter 8
    2. Prepare Case 8.1
    3. Make notes for discussion on readings
    Bushe, G. and R., M. (2014). The Dialogic Mindset in Organization Development. Research in Organizational Change and Development, 22, pp. 54-97. Participation
    10 Project Presentations None None Project Presentations
    11 The Processual Turn
    1. Chapter 9
    2. Prepare Case 9.1
    3. Make notes for discussion on readings
    Buchanan, D. and Dawson, P. (2007). Discourse and audience: Organizational change as multi-story process. Journal of Management Studies, 44, pp. 669-686. Participation
    12 Time, Sensemaking and Politics: Field trip Parliament House
    1. Read pages: 226-230 and 338-341
    2. Make notes for discussion on readings
    Dawson, P. and C. Sykes (2018) ‘Concepts of time and temporality in the storytelling and sensemaking literatures: A review and critique’, paper being prepared for journal submission. Participation
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Participation in lectures, seminars and workshops Individual 10% 1,2,3,4
    Critical evaluative piece Individual 25% 1,2,4
    Project presentation (plus A4 summary handout) Group 25% 2,3,4
    Written assignment Individual 40% 1,2,3,4
    Assessment Detail

    Critical Evaluative Piece:

    Students are required to submit a critical evaluative piece (1200 words) on a change concept, model or framework. You should:

    • Identify a concept, model, framework or theory in which you have an interest
    • Summarize and critically evaluate, which includes:
      • Explaining concept, model or theory
      • Assessing weaknesses and strengths
      • Identifying and discussing potential areas for future development
    • Conclude

    Written Assignment

    Students need to: Provide an assessment of the change kaleidoscope as a diagnostic tool for managing change.  Each student is expected to submit a written assignment. Each assignment must be individually prepared and consist of no more than 2000 words (the 2000 words does not include any tables, diagrams, the bibliography and any appendices). You must also include a full bibliography following the Harvard referencing style. There are a number of guidelines available (see the web). If you are using referencing software, such as EndNote choose the style Sage Harvard. Alternatively you can either use the British system (where reference at the end has the author name and initials in Capitals) or the American (where not in capitals). There has been a useful guide for Education students at the University of Aberdeen in pdf format that you may wish to refer to at URL:

    http://www.abdn.ac.uk/library/documents/guides/edu/ugedu010.pdf

    Make sure that you follow normal citation conventions in preparing your coursework by citing the ideas or data of others at the point in your coursework where these ideas and data are included. Anyone who is unsure about citation should speak to the course leader.

    Project Presentation

    Presentations will be made to peers during the afternoon on day 5 of scheduled activities. Each group presentation will be between 20-30 minutes excluding time for questions. A suitable electronic slide show (e.g. power-point or prezi) should be prepared in support of the presentation.

    The group project work task is to: Identify and describe an innovation of your choice and then to consider whether there are any implications of this innovation for theory development.

    This task requires a groups of students to:
    1. Identify an innovation of your choice (any form of innovation can be chosen, for example, from those that are well known historical examples through to the more obscure and largely unknown innovations).
      1. Summarise the innovation (background information/nature of innovation)
      2. Assess the import of the innovation for society, organizations, people
    2. Identify concepts, models or theories (field of organizational change/innovation) that help explain key aspects of this innovation, for example:
      1. Emergence and development
      2. Impact on society/organizations
      3. Process and outcomes
    3. Discuss the extent to which concepts/models/theories align or not, that is:
      1. Do they help to explain?
      2. What areas do they fail to explain?
    4. Evaluate implications for concept/model/theory development and conclude

    Making the link between a practical example of an innovation and theory is the key learning and challenging part of the task. The main output from the project will be an A4 summary of key findings and a 20-30 minute presentation.

    Submission

    To gain a pass for this course, as student must achieve at least 50% overall with a minimum of 45% for the weighted average of all individual components. Students not achieving this requirement will have a fail (F) recorded as their final grade.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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