HIST 3068 - Uniting the Kingdoms: Britain 1534-1801

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

England, Scotland and Ireland were united under the crown in 1603, and the principality of Wales had been formally annexed to England under Henry VIII. But there was no substantive `British? identity before the eighteenth century, at the earliest. The fraught relations between the three kingdoms, which often manifested as rebellions and war, suggest that the British nation was always an artificial construct which papered over serious and enduring divisions among the three kingdoms and four peoples. Yet in the eighteenth century Britain held together to win several wars against its main European rival, France. The constituent parts of the Union participated actively in those campaigns, and during the following century they helped to establish a second British Empire to replace the one that was lost in America. This course takes a comparative approach to the histories of early modern England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales to examine the ways in which power was wielded and opposed over three centuries during the attempt to form a kingdom united under English rule, from the revolt of the Fitzgeralds of Kildare (1534) to the second Act of Union (1801). Particular attention is paid to the British context: the impact of English imperialism on its Anglo-Celtic neighbours, the absorption of Wales, the conquest and colonisation of Ireland, and the conflicts with Scots and Irish people which led to acts of union in 1707 and 1801.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3068
    Course Uniting the Kingdoms: Britain 1534-1801
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Course Description England, Scotland and Ireland were united under the crown in 1603, and the principality of Wales had been formally annexed to England under Henry VIII. But there was no substantive `British? identity before the eighteenth century, at the earliest. The fraught relations between the three kingdoms, which often manifested as rebellions and war, suggest that the British nation was always an artificial construct which papered over serious and enduring divisions among the three kingdoms and four peoples. Yet in the eighteenth century Britain held together to win several wars against its main European rival, France. The constituent parts of the Union participated actively in those campaigns, and during the following century they helped to establish a second British Empire to replace the one that was lost in America. This course takes a comparative approach to the histories of early modern England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales to examine the ways in which power was wielded and opposed over three centuries during the attempt to form a kingdom united under English rule, from the revolt of the Fitzgeralds of Kildare (1534) to the second Act of Union (1801). Particular attention is paid to the British context: the impact of English imperialism on its Anglo-Celtic neighbours, the absorption of Wales, the conquest and colonisation of Ireland, and the conflicts with Scots and Irish people which led to acts of union in 1707 and 1801.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Elsa Reuter

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    By the end of the course, students should be able to: 
    1 Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the history of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
    2 Demonstrate an understanding of how historians have interpreted and explained this history, and show an awareness of the socially-constructed nature of historical knowledge.
    3 Independently locate a wide range of primary and secondary sources appropriate to the study of sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and eighteenth-century Britain, using on-line databases.
    4 Contextualise and interpret a wide range of primary and secondary sources to understand and critically evaluate the period and the arguments of historians.
    5 Construct evidence-based arguments in which students engage with the key debates about the formation of a British nation, including the impact on and responses by England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
    6 Develop and communicate their ideas about the history of Britain, both orally and in writing, within the conventions of the discipline of history.
    7 Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical implications of the practice of history in shaping our understanding of the historical cultures of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    5, 6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3, 4, 5, 6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no textbook for this course. All tutorial readings are electronic and will be accessible via the course's MyUni Canvas site.
    Recommended Resources
    Texts you may find useful are:

    Ellis, Steven. The Making of the British Isles: The State of Britain and Ireland 1450-1660. London: Routledge, 2007.

    Lockyer, Roger. Tudor and Stuart Britain. Harlow, UK: Pearson Education Ltd., 2005.

    O'Gorman, Frank. The Long Eighteenth Century: British Political and Social History 1688-1832. London: Bloomsbury, 2016.

    Ireland

    Lenihan, Padraig. Consolidating Conquest: Ireland 1603-1727. Harlow, UK: Pearson Education Ltd., 2008. 

    Moody, T W, Martin, F X & Byrne, F J (eds). A New History of Ireland, vol 3: Early Modern Ireland. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

    Moody, T W & Vaughan, W E (eds). A New History of Ireland, vol 4: Eighteenth-century Ireland. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.

    Scotland

    Goodare, Julian. State and Society in Early Modern Scotland. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.

    Devine, T M & Wormald, Jenny (eds). The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.

    Wales

    Jenkins, Geraint. The Foundations of Modern Wales 1642-1780. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

    Williams, Glanmor. Renewal and Reformation Wales 1415-1642. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.




    Online Learning
    The course has a website, accessible through MyUni. Please consult it regularly for readings, updates, lecture recordings, powerpoint slides, and additional resources.

    The University has access to a number of academic journals that have full text articles available online. Use Academic OneFile , Academic Search Premier , Project Muse and JSTOR databases (on the Library’s catalogue, Library Search) to locate articles in these journals.

    Librarians at the Barr-Smith library have also compiled a very useful guide to primary and secondary sources for early modern and eighteenth-century British history, particularly related to the Uniting the Kingdoms course. This can be accessed online here.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Face-to-face teaching on campus consisting of a two-hour lecture and one tutorial per week.

    The lecture will combine the traditional lecture format with the use of audio-visual material, and will provide the broader context for the tutorial topics.

    Tutorials will explore a specific topic through discussion and debate. Students will prepare for each week by completing the set reading as well as finding a relevant primary or secondary source related to their group.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will need to devote approximately 13 hours per week to this course (divided over 12 weeks of study). This consists of 1x 2-hour lecture and one tutorial per week, and 10 hours per week of independent study, during which time students will prepare for tutorials and work on assignments.

    This course is designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including lectures, tutorials, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 156 hours.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Lectures
    Lectures will cover the Tudor, Stuart and Hanoverian regimes and their approaches to governing England, Ireland Scotland and Wales. Specific topics include the Reformation, the reign of Elizabeth I, the Stuarts, the Civil Wars, the regicide and interregnum period, the 1688 "revolution", the Enlightenment and the Acts of Union. 

    Tutorials
    At the beginning of the course, students will be asked to select either England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales as the focus of their research for and discussion in tutorials. Each week students will be expected to find a primary or secondary source that is relevant to the week's topic and their chosen focus to contribute to their group. Tutorials will also form the basis of their SGDE assignment. 
    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The SGDE will form part of students’ participation in their tutorials as well as one of their assessments. Students will form small groups of 3-4 with each group focusing on the experience of either England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales. Each week students will research and discuss the perspective of their group revelant to the topic at hand, eg. the Reformation. This work will form the basis of a presentation on the impact of and response to English imperialism from the reign of Henry VIII through to the Act of Union (1801).
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Weighting Learning Outcome
    Annotated Bibliography Formative & Summative

    Week 4

    15% 2, 3, 4
    Research Essay (3000 words) Formative & Summative Week 7 50% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    SGDE Presentation Formative & Summative Week 10 20% 1, 5, 6, 7
    Class Test Summative Week 12 15% 1, 5, 6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    N/A
    Assessment Detail
    Annotated bibliography: A list of 8 -10 citations, including primary and secondary sources, with each citation accompanied by a 100 – 150 word descriptive and evaluative paragraph examining the relevance and value of the source to supporting the argument in answer to their chosen essay question.

    Research essay: A 3000-word essay in response to a question, supported by critical analysis of evidence from primary and secondary sources. The questions will be distributed to students at the beginning of the course.

    SGDE presentation: Groups of 3-4 students will script and present on the period from 1534 to the 1801 Act of Union from the perspective of their group's focus, eg. England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales.

    Class test: A 2-hour in-class test held at the end of semester to evaluate students' understanding of the key events and themes covered in the course. 
    Submission
    Written assignments must be submitted to the Online Turnitin Submission point on MyUni by 23:59 on the due date. Please keep note of submission receipts as proof of submission.

    Extensions will be granted on the grounds of hardship or illness. Students must apply through the official procedure (https://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/modified/) unless:
    1. The extension required is two days or less;
    2. The assessment is worth 20% or less;
    3. The student is registered with the Disability Office and has a Disability Access Plan.

    Students who submit an essay late, without having gained an extension, will be liable to a penalty of 2% per day that the essay is overdue, including weekends, for a maximum of one week. Unless special arrangements have been made, essays more than one week late may not be accepted.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    In addition to the SELTs, students will be encouraged to give feedback on any aspect of the course throughout the course. This includes, but is not limited to, content, teaching and assessments. 
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.