PHIL 1111OL - Introduction to Logic Online

Online - Summer - 2020

Logic is fundamental to the way humans communicate. Our public debates and private reasoning are shaped by logical principles, even though most of us would struggle to spell them out. Introduction to Logic Online will cover the basics of formal logic, which provides symbolic methods for representing and assessing the logical form of arguments. You will develop an understanding of symbolic language and logic, as well as familiarity with precise models of deductive reasoning. However, no previous experience with symbolic methods or mathematics is assumed. There are no prerequisites, but many students find that Argument and Critical Thinking is a useful preliminary. This course is offered fully online and intensively over a 4 week period. Students engage with pre-recorded lecture materials and participate in the equivalent of 3 hours per week of structured discussion.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PHIL 1111OL
    Course Introduction to Logic Online
    Coordinating Unit Philosophy
    Term Summer
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Online
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week online
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible PHIL 1110
    Course Description Logic is fundamental to the way humans communicate. Our public debates and private reasoning are shaped by logical principles, even though most of us would struggle to spell them out. Introduction to Logic Online will cover the basics of formal logic, which provides symbolic methods for representing and assessing the logical form of arguments. You will develop an understanding of symbolic language and logic, as well as familiarity with precise models of deductive reasoning. However, no previous experience with symbolic methods or mathematics is assumed. There are no prerequisites, but many students find that Argument and Critical Thinking is a useful preliminary.

    This course is offered fully online and intensively over a 4 week period. Students engage with pre-recorded lecture materials and participate in the equivalent of 3 hours per week of structured discussion.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Antony Eagle

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The course has no regularly timetabled activities. Course material is supplied in screencast micro-lectures and online discussion boards, and students can engage with course content on a timetable of their own choosing and without coming to campus.

    Students can expect to be involved in learning and assessment activities for this course between January 13 and February 21, 2020.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Represent the structure of statements and arguments using a formal logical framework;
    2. Assess formalised arguments for validity using truth tables and deductive methods;
    3. Apply these formal methods to clarify and assess real-world arguments;
    4. Display knowledge of and facility with symbolic logic under a variety of assessment conditions;
    5. Demonstrate understanding of interpretative questions and controversies arising from formal approaches to real world statements and arguments.
    ​
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3,5
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    There is an open access textbook that is freely downloadable:

    PD Magnus, Tim Button, and Antony Eagle (2019) Forallx Adelaide https://github.com/antonyeagle/forallx-adl.

    The course is structured around this text, so all students are required to familiarise themselves with it. If there is sufficient interest, the book may be made available in a hard copy for purchase.

    ​
    Online Learning
    This course is run wholly online and asynchronously. If there is sufficient interest, there may be opportunities to take part in 'webinar' discussions facilitated by the course coordinator using Zoom. 

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course is offered intensively, with four weeks allocated indicatively to content mastery, and two weeks to take-home examination. The course workload is equivalent to a semester-length course:

    WORKLOADTOTAL HOURS
    STRUCTURED LEARNING
    6 hours equivalent lectures per week 24 hours per semester
    6 x 15 minute discussion activities per week 6 hours per semester
    4 x 30 minute quiz answer review per week 6 hours per semester
    Sub-total 36 hours
    SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING
    6 hours reading per week 24 hours per semester
    10 hours quiz preparation/completion per week 40 hours per semester
    10 hours take home exam preparation per week 40 hours per semester
    4 hours completion of sample exercises per week 16 hours per semester
    Sub-total 120 hours
    TOTAL 156 hours per semester
    ​
    Learning Activities Summary

    Students can engage with course content on their own schedule, so long as they are prepared for the two take-home exams at the appropriate times. You expect the following broad pattern of activities when enrolled in this course:

    DateCourse WeekActivity/ContentTextbook sections covered
    January 13–17 1 The nature of argument; sentential logic; beginning truth tables §§1–9
    January 20–24 2 Truth tables completed; proofs in sentential logic §§10–13, §§26–29, §§31–32
    January 27–31 First take-home exam
    February 3–7 3 Quantified logic and its semantics; identity and descriptions §§15–21
    February 10–14 4 Interpretations and proofs in quantified logic; advanced topics §14, §§22–25, §30, §§33–38
    February 17–21 Final take-home exam
    ​
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASKTASK TYPEWEIGHTINGCOURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
    Online quizzes Formative and Summative 40% 1,2,3,4
    Take home midterm exam Summative 30% 1,2,3,4,5
    Take home final exam Summative 30% 1,2,3,4,5
    ​
    Assessment Detail
    AssessmentDescription% weighting
    Online quizzes Students complete online quizzes through MyUni associated with each topic. There will be approximately 30–35 short quizzes, each worth the same amount, to a total of 40% of the course mark. 40%
    Mid term exam Students complete a mid term take home open book exam on the first half of the course material. Students have 72 hours to complete the exam. 30%
    Final exam Students complete a mid term take home open book exam on the second half of the course material. Students have 72 hours to complete the exam. 30%
    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.