VET TECH 1015RW - Introduction to Mechanisms of Health I

Roseworthy Campus - Semester 2 - 2021

The work of Veterinary Technologists includes ensuring animals are well cared for and as well protected as possible from adverse environmental and health conditions. This course will provide the student veterinary technologist with some of the basic knowledge and tools to keep healthy animals in good health, and to monitor their health. The delivery of the course includes a series of lectures and practical classes where students will work collectively, independently or in small groups to experience the excitement of learning by experience. This approach to learning will help provide the student with skills to be effective life-long learners. This course will deliver learning experiences in the fields of Parasitology, Nutrition and Immunology. All topics central to ensuring and maintaining good health in animal species.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code VET TECH 1015RW
    Course Introduction to Mechanisms of Health I
    Coordinating Unit School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Roseworthy Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions Available to Bachelor of Veterinary Technology students only
    Course Description The work of Veterinary Technologists includes ensuring animals are well cared for and as well protected as possible from adverse environmental and health conditions. This course will provide the student veterinary technologist with some of the basic knowledge and tools to keep healthy animals in good health, and to monitor their health. The delivery of the course includes a series of lectures and practical classes where students will work collectively, independently or in small groups to experience the excitement of learning by experience. This approach to learning will help provide the student with skills to be effective life-long learners. This course will deliver learning experiences in the fields of Parasitology, Nutrition and Immunology. All topics central to ensuring and maintaining good health in animal species.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Brett Smith

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Discuss the role parasites play in animal and human health and identify common endo and ectoparasites in some domestic species.
    2 Describe the ways in which animals obtain their nutrition from dietary sources.
    3 Develop basic diets for dogs, cats, horses and ruminant farm animals.
    4 Explain the ways in which the immune system and vaccines can protect animals and humans from ill health.
    5 Apply and interpret basic haematological and serological tests which are used in veterinary laboratories to monitor the health of animals.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 2, 4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary
    What internal and external parasites are relevant to our companion and production species, and how do these effect animal health?
     
    Identify common animal parasites that have the potential to be zoonotic.

    How do we detect and manage parasites in our animals?

    Animals and humans require dietary nutrients to survive and enjoy good health. What are those nutrients and how much do they need?
     
    How does the digestive system of animals work and individual nutritional requirements achieved from their diets?

    What are the systems used to describe and measure the quality of diets which may be offered to animals?
     
    What does the immune system of animals do?

    How do vaccines help protect animals and humans from disease?
     
    What vaccines can we give dogs, cats, horses, cows and sheep?

    Can we measure the levels of antibodies in an animal and, if so, what does it tell us?

    What are the components of blood that we can measure in small veterinary laboratories?

    How do the levels of these components help us to know that animals are in good health?
    Specific Course Requirements
    The course will be delivered as a program of 72 hours of lectures and practical classes.

    Attendance at all practical classes (as identified by course coordinator) is compulsory. Student attendance will be recorded to track
    engagement and attendance.

    Students must have appropriate professional and protective clothing and footwear for practical classes, which may include white coats, overalls and boots.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Hurdle
    Yes or No
    Learning Outcome Due
    Early semester open book exam Summative 20% No 1 Week 5
    Mid semester open book exam Summative 20% No 2, 3 Week 8
    Late semester open book exam Summative 20% No 4, 5 Week 12
    Written Group Assignment Summative 40% No 1, 2, 3, 4 Week 13
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Assessment Item with hurdle % needed to meet hurdle Is additional assessment available if student does not meet hurdle requirement If additional assessment is available, explain what type
    Attendance at and participation in the practical classes is compulsory Engagement and completion of all practicals. Students missing more than two practical classes will fail the course unless they can provide signed medical certificates in line with University policy. Remedial practicals will be offered where reasonably possible. In many cases, practical classes require the time-consuming creation of resources and may be impractical to reproduce for small student groups. If one or two classes are missed students will be required to complete alternate activities, devised by the Course Coordinator, in order to achieve and demonstrate the skills involved in the missed class/es.
    Assessment Detail
    Three open book exams (60%)
    In each of these three equally weighted exams (20% of final grade each) of one hour in length each, students will be given a series of examination questions and will be able to use learning resources to assist answering the questions. There will be one exam each on the topics of Parasitology, Nutrition and Immunology addressing the theory delivered within each topic period.

    Written Group Assignment (40%)
    The group assignment will be based around a client information sheet on an assigned species covering the three topic areas of the course, parasitology, nutrition, and immunology. 10% of the course mark will be allocated to each of the three topic areas and a further 10% will be a peer assigned contribution grade for each group member’s involvement in the process.
    Submission
    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted, then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that the assignment is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days late or more without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the marks available for that assignment.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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