COMP SCI 2009 - Programming for IT Specialists

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

Programming for IT Specialists builds on the programming knowledge developed in COMP SCI 1015 Introduction to Programming for IT Specialists to provide students with a solid coding foundation to undertake Information Technology work at the professional level. Students are introduced to other languages that are heavily used for systems works, including compiled, interpreted, and scripting languages, as well as the data structures and concepts vital to working in the systems area. Students will be introduced to key programming paradigms, such as object-oriented programming, event driven programming, and network programming. Students will develop working systems across a variety of platforms and will be assessed through programming assignments, weekly quizzes, project work, and a final examination. The course uses current technology and real examples to provide an authentic and useful development environment. While the majority of the course is assessed at the individual level, there are a number of group activities to build on the non-technical skills introduced in earlier courses.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code COMP SCI 2009
    Course Programming for IT Specialists
    Coordinating Unit School of Computer Science
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange
    Prerequisites COMP SCI 1015
    Incompatible COMP SCI 1102, COMP SCI 1202, COMP SCI 2202, COMP SCI 2202B
    Course Description Programming for IT Specialists builds on the programming knowledge developed in COMP SCI 1015 Introduction to Programming for IT Specialists to provide students with a solid coding foundation to undertake Information Technology work at the professional level. Students are introduced to other languages that are heavily used for systems works, including compiled, interpreted, and scripting languages, as well as the data structures and concepts vital to working in the systems area. Students will be introduced to key programming paradigms, such as object-oriented programming, event driven programming, and network programming. Students will develop working systems across a variety of platforms and will be assessed through programming assignments, weekly quizzes, project work, and a final examination. The course uses current technology and real examples to provide an authentic and useful development environment. While the majority of the course is assessed at the individual level, there are a number of group activities to build on the non-technical skills introduced in earlier courses.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Tim Chen

    Lecturer: Dr Tim Chen
    Lecturer:
    Dr Andrey Kan
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The following activities are timetabled for every week in semester.

    Lecture: Lectures are made available at 9am on Mondays. This will also be the time when the lecturers will live stream any content.

    Note: These lectures are on-line ONLY. If they are live-streamed, they will be recorded. The lecture may also consist of pre-recorded material for you to view at this time. You have the option of participating during the live-streaming session or any time after they are published in MyUni. Please check MyUni once enrolled for details regarding when lectures will be published.

    Workshops: Each student will have a two hour workshop, either face-to-face for students in Adelaide, or on-line for remote students. During this time, students will work through allocated problems with the supervision of a demonstration team.

    Practical sessions: Each student will have a two hour practical session, either face-to-face for students in Adelaide, or on-line for remote students. Students will have the opportunity to work on assigned practical problems, be marked for previous work, or submit work conducted outside of the session.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. Use Unix-based tools and BASH scripts to carry out system tasks
    2. Explain the benefits of object oriented design and understand when it is an appropriate methodology to use.
    3. Design object oriented solutions for small systems involving multiple objects.
    4. Implement, test and debug solutions in Python and C++.
    5. Manage memory usage in C/C++ programs,
    6. Explain fundamental computing algorithms, 
    7. Analyse algorithms and identify key algorithmic strategies, and
    8. Explain and apply regular expressions for common system tasks.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-8
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2-5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2,6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no required text book for this course. All materials will be provided through the University's Learning Management System, MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    The University provides computers on campus for students but remote students may find it useful to have access to a Linux computing environment, whether directly on their machine, via virtualisation, or using the Windows Subsystem for Linux v2. While there are many excellent online resources, students may also find it useful to consult any of the following books as a reference: 

    • Bash Guide for Beginners. (By Machtelt Garrels)
    • Advanced Bash Scripting Guide. (By Mendel Cooper)
    • Tutorial: programming in C, UNIX system calls and subroutines using C. (By A. D. Marshall)
    Don't forget that we have an excellent library!
    Online Learning
    All lectures will be conducted on-line. An on-line practical and workshop offering is available for remote students and those unable to attend campus. The course material will be available on-line throught the University's learning management system, myuni.adelaide.edu.au, and synchronised video meetings will be conducted over the Zoom platform.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    While the course is available in a 100% remote option for students unable to attend campus, there are face-to-face workshop and practical sessions for students, but all lectures are presented on-line.

    Lectures will be delivered as a combination of recorded live streams and pre-recording material. 

    Workshops will be small-scale activities where students will have the opportunity to work in small groups to complete a set of tasks.

    Practicals, and practical examinations, will be an individual activity where students complete tasks to demonstrate their current level of knowledge.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The expected course workload is 10 hours per week. This means that students are expected to put in at least 5 hours of work on projects in their own time, on a weekly basis.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The following activities are timetabled for every week in semester.

    Lecture: Lectures are made available at 9am on Mondays. This will also be the time when the lecturers will live stream any content.

    Note: These lectures are on-line ONLY. If they are live-streamed, they will be recorded. The lecture may also consist of pre-recorded material for you to view at this time. You have the option of participating during the live-streaming session or any time after they are published in MyUni. Please check MyUni once enrolled for details regarding when lectures will be published.

    Workshops: Each student will have a two hour workshop, either face-to-face for students in Adelaide, or on-line for remote students. During this time, students will work through allocated problems with the supervision of a demonstration team.

    Practical sessions: Each student will have a two hour practical session, either face-to-face for students in Adelaide, or on-line for remote students. Students will have the opportunity to work on assigned practical problems, be marked for previous work, or submit work conducted outside of the session.
    Specific Course Requirements
    There are no specific course requirements.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    There are no SGDE activities scheduled for this course.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessment for this course consists of a range of practical programming exercises, the completion of workshop exercises, quizzes and other coding assignments. There is no written examination for this course. All of these and their deadlines will be clearly identified on the course pages in MyUni.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    There are no specific requirements for this course other than those stated in relevant University policy.
    Assessment Detail
    Name Type Course weight
    Practical Exams Coding exam 40%
    Weekly Pracs Small coding assignments 15%
    Major coding assignments Large coding assignments 25%
    Weekly workshops Small scale activity 10%
    Weekly quizzes Knowledge quiz 10%
    Submission
    Submission of materials will take place through the University's submission systems, including MyUni (our LMS), and any required University repositories. Each assignment will clearly state the type of submission required for each assignment. Where electronic submission is required, our default, we reserve the right to not accept non-electronic submissions unless this is approved in advance or arranged as part of an access plan.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    This course is running for the first time in 2021. There are no previous SELT results to display.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.