CLAS 2040OL - Archaeology of Classical and Hellenistic Greece

Online - Semester 2 - 2021

In this course, you will be introduced to the key techniques for recognising and dating Greek pottery, painting, sculpture and architecture of the Classical and Hellenistic periods, with a focus on the late 6th-3rd centuries BC. For the first part of the course, you will become familiar with the origins of the Classical Style that was to have a lasting effect upon western views of art, firstly via Roman enthusiasm for it in antiquity, and again upon its ?rediscovery? in the Romantic era. You will also look at the important role that Athenian painted pottery plays in dating archaeological sites. By the end of the course, you should be familiar with at least one dated artefact, sculpture and building from each quarter-century from the late 6th to early 3rd centuries. Excavations at sites such as Athens, Aigai and Verghina in Greece and Pergamon in Asia Minor (modern Turkey), provide case-studies for you to explore the material culture of Greece during its most influential period in ancient history.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CLAS 2040OL
    Course Archaeology of Classical and Hellenistic Greece
    Coordinating Unit Classics
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Online
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 Units of Undergraduate study
    Course Description In this course, you will be introduced to the key techniques for recognising and dating Greek pottery, painting, sculpture and architecture of the Classical and Hellenistic periods, with a focus on the late 6th-3rd centuries BC. For the first part of the course, you will become familiar with the origins of the Classical Style that was to have a lasting effect upon western views of art, firstly via Roman enthusiasm for it in antiquity, and again upon its ?rediscovery? in the Romantic era. You will also look at the important role that Athenian painted pottery plays in dating archaeological sites. By the end of the course, you should be familiar with at least one dated artefact, sculpture and building from each quarter-century from the late 6th to early 3rd centuries.
    Excavations at sites such as Athens, Aigai and Verghina in Greece and Pergamon in Asia Minor (modern Turkey), provide case-studies for you to explore the material culture of Greece during its most influential period in ancient history.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Margaret O'Hea

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    1. understand how archaeologists use stylistic analysis in dating ancient Greek material, and what cultural assumptions underly this;

    2. be able to identify major works of Classical and Hellenistic Greek sculpture, pottery and architecture through stylistic analysis and other archaeological techniques, where applicable;

    3. be introduced to English-language scholarship on Classical Greek archaeology and some current debates within it.




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2 and 3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2, 3
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    See MyUni at the beginning of this course.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    • Weekly online lectures (maximum 2 per week)
    • Fortnightly Zoom tutorial (1 hour per week) on topics from the tutorial programme on MyUni, starting week 1, alternating with
    • fortnightly online visual quiz (max. 30 mins duration) - 5 in total, starting week 2.
    • Weekly discussion board starting week 2 and ending week 11.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.
    An average of 12 hours per week, comprising:
    • 2.5-3 contact hours(lectures, Zoom tutorials/quizzes)
    • average of 3 hours of background-reading and note-taking to consolidate lecture-notes
    • average of 2 hours of tutorial readings and note-taking
    • average of 4 hours of research (reading and note-taking), cogitation, organisation and writing of assignments
    Learning Activities Summary
    The lectures will cover architecture, sculpture, pottery and minor arts from the origins of the Classical Style to the early Hellenistic period.
    The tutorial programme and lecture topics will be on MyUni for this course
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    • 5 online visual quizzes 8% each, total 40%:  Starting in week 2,   fortnightly visual tests  on identifying key artefacts/works of
      art/buildings will help students to recognise changes in form or style throughout the Classical and Hellenistic period.
    • Research essay at end of semester 40% - topic choices to be provided by end of Week 2.
    • Active participation in discussion boards 10%: Starting in week 2, these board activities ensure that the student is consistently
      engaged with the new, weekly material, visual images from lectures and from the modules, as well as selected weekly readings. There will be 10 discussion boards – effective participation is 1, non-participation is 0.
    • 1 short tutorial entry in first half of semester 10%: Students will be assigned to one of three topics at the start of semester – sculpture, pottery or architecture. Each student will be marked on one entry made in the first four weeks of the semester, using weekly readings.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Regular attendance at tutorials is expected of all students in this course. Students should watch and take notes of lectures on a weekly basis.
    Assessment Detail
    Guides to formatting, structure and citation styles for written assessment will be  on MyUni for this course, and should be followed for all written work. Assessment criteria  includes showing the appropriate use and formatting of citations and bibliography. Word limits for written assignments are approximate guides only. However, a penalty will apply to any paper less than 66% of the
    word limit, or more  than 133% of the word limit. This penalty will be a deduction of 5% of the final mark for that paper.* See the School rules pertaining to late submissions on MyUni for this course.


    Submission
    • Students must keep a copy of all assignments until their final grades for the course have been officially released.Classics staff will not read or comment on any first drafts of  papers. However, students are encouraged to talk to their tutor about their essay plan and direction of  argument.
    • Any student with an ongoing, serious medical or personal condition  which is likely to impact significantly on work is strongly advised to consult with a Student Counsellor or Disability Liaison Officer at the start of semester. A plan can then be negotiated with the course co-ordinator about any necessary modifications to  assessment, such as extension of due dates (although there will be no exemptions from all  the assignments, or from regular class attendance).
    • There is no possibility to resubmit any written assignment in this course. See MyUni for this course for School-wide rules on late penalties, and Faculty-wide policy on applications for late submission without penalty.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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