PROF 3600 - The Indian Century?: A Virtual Study Tour UG

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2021

This virtual overseas experience will bring India to life through interactive activities such as on location Zoom sessions from a Hindu temple; a walking tour of Dharavi where you will meet residents of Asia?s largest slum; and even virtual treasure hunts to reveal incredible India using Google Earth. Each week includes three different ways for you to experience India: a seminar; an activity; and a panel discussion or case study shared by a guest speaker. Sessions typically include interactions with present and former employees from some of the world?s most exciting companies including Google, Facebook, EY, Infosys, Fabindia, Zomato and more. As well as prepare you for future travel to India this course might just help your 21st Century career. India is increasingly connected with graduate jobs too. Learning about India really has never been more relevant.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PROF 3600
    Course The Indian Century?: A Virtual Study Tour UG
    Coordinating Unit Professions Office
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This virtual overseas experience will bring India to life through interactive activities such as on location Zoom sessions from a Hindu temple; a walking tour of Dharavi where you will meet residents of Asia?s largest slum; and even virtual treasure hunts to reveal incredible India using Google Earth. Each week includes three different ways for you to experience India: a seminar; an activity; and a panel discussion or case study shared by a guest speaker.
    Sessions typically include interactions with present and former employees from some of the world?s most exciting companies including Google, Facebook, EY, Infosys, Fabindia, Zomato and more.
    As well as prepare you for future travel to India this course might just help your 21st Century career. India is increasingly connected with graduate jobs too. Learning about India really has never been more relevant.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Miss Melissa Connor

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. Discover, assess and articulate the significance of India within the wider human story - past, present and future.
    2. Recognise local and global challenges faced by India and how they align with, and impact, Australia.
    3. Describe ways India solves problems through different approaches to innovation – from the global business delivery model to low-cost medical devices.
    4. Apply analysis of Indian case studies to their degrees by learning directly from guest presenters at companies and social enterprises. Especially with regard to innovation in the 21st Century and the Indian connection to many careers.
    5. Gain experience working in digital environments by applying varied techniques to locate and evaluate information from Indian sources; collaborating in virtual environments; and communicating through visual as well as written presentation.
    6. Consolidate their learning by recognising the relevance of India to future career paths – from designing products and services for Indian consumers, to collaborating with Indian colleagues, to shaping and implementing practices that help solve common challenges.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2,3,5
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    2,3,6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Selected readings from books and papers will be provided
    Recommended Resources

    A reference list will be shared for further non-fiction and fiction readings.

    Twitter lists, online news/blogs and curated YouTube playlists will be recommended for students to follow and prompt discussion during the interactive sessions.

    Annual Reports from the companies and social enterprises will provide background for students prior to the interactions with guest speakers.

    We shall also be recommending movies, series and documentaries on Netflix and Amazon Prime as ways for students to engage and deepen their cultural understanding of India.

    Google Earth will be used to gain understanding of how India fits together and the diversity of the country (habitats, monuments and socio-economic variation).

    Online Learning
    Students will be engaged using innovative virtual techniques which help them develop transferable research and digital collaboration skills. These include ZOOM (including breakout rooms for smaller group work), online web resources and gamification (eg. Kahoot!, Menti and Perusall) and Google Earth.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Students will be engaged using innovative virtual techniques which help them develop transferable research and digital collaboration skills. These include ZOOM (including breakout rooms for smaller group work), online web resources and gamification (eg. Kahoot!, Menti and Perusall) and Google Earth. The Course Instructor will be based in India as will many of the guest speakers. During some sessions we shall include live interaction in the field – including walking tours of Delhi, Mumbai and Jaipur. Should social distancing policies allow it we shall organise some face-to-face activities such as Bollywood dance, yoga, movie night etc to give students a chance to meet each other in person. These will be alumni and student led, optional and will not count towards attendance.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Each week will have three distinct hour-long sessions – a lecture, a seminar featuring an interactive activity, a case study or panel session by guest experts.

    Students will be expected to also do a minimum of 6 hours reading, preparation and research. Eg. reading source texts prior to the lecture; online research such as finding and read web articles or YouTube documentaries related to the activity; and reading the annual report and secondary sources in prep for the guest session.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week Lecture Activities
    1 Is this the Indian Century? Why India? Why Now? India Quiz Game (via Kahoot!) inspired by Hans Rosling’s Factfulness with a discussion challenging our preconceptions
    2 Why is India the most diverse place on earth? (Environment & Culture) An Incredible India Treasure Hunt (Google Earth)
    3 What is meant by “Hinduism”? Introducing some key concepts and context - from life rituals and the Hindu goals of life to demystifying caste. Meet the Gods and Goddesses of the Hindu Pantheon (Temple Tour)
    4 India’s Plurality – from the indigenous religions of Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism to Bahai, Christianity, Judaism, Zoroastrianism & Islam Street Tour of Old Delhi – Experiencing Historic and Contemporary Plurality
    5 Why India is a World Leader in Compassionate Innovation? Social Enterprises Group Case Study Presentations
    6 India and the World: from Indian Ocean trade to the British Empire The Indian Connection: A Global Treasure Hunt of Indian Influence (Google Earth)
    7 The World’s Largest Democracy - The Independence of India, The Political System, Main Parties, Core Electoral Issues and Current Government Policies & Issues How Does India Get its News: Newspapers, TV, Online, Twitter
    8 From IT Services to Make in India: How India Re-Emerged as the Fastest Growing Major Economy in the World Your Cultural Compass Report –Comparing Your Preferences with other Australians and Indians using Hofstedes Cultural Insights Framework
    9 Digital India – From the World’s Largest Biometric ID Scheme to Banning TikTok India’s Digital Payments Revolution (Paytm, Google, Facebook) and the Battle for Indian
    10 eCommerce and Startup Ecosystem – Who is Building Billion Dollar Businesses in India and How In a Post-COVID world which Indian startup product should be launched in Australia? (Case Method)
    11 Learning About India Through Popular Culture – From Bollywood to Netflix Startup or Social Enterprise Pitch-Day (Group Presentations)
    12 Looking to the Future: India’s and Yours (Economy, Politics, Careers, Study Abroad) Revealing Invisible India’s Influence on Your Career - Articulating Your Experience with Employers
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due Length Weighting Learning Outcome
    Activities Individual Weekly Quiz 10-20 Questions 30% 1,2,3
    Presentation Group Week 5 10 Slide / 15 mins 10% 2-5
    Presentation Group Week 11 10 Slide / 15 mins 10% 2-5
    Reflective Essay Individual Week 12 2,000 words 50% 1-6
    Total 100%
    Assessment Detail

    A formative assessment will be provided to students after Week 4 based on their weekly quiz results and a participation rubric (shared in week one).

    Weekly Quizzes will be done during class via Kahoot! and asynchronously on Canvas.

    Presentations: Students are expected to contribute to two group presentations. They will work in groups using Google Slides and Zoom breakout rooms and will present live to the class. Established rubrics will be used to score the presentations.

    Reflective essay will be assessed using a rubric shared with students in advance. The reflective essay will incorporate;

    • Research
    • Knowledge and Comprehension
    • Creativity and Imagination
    • Structure and Presentation
    • Problem Solving and Critical Thinking
    Submission
    • Cover Sheet: Please submit, separate to your assignment, the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work. Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration.
    • Backup Copy of Assignments: You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing. Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Teaching Staff prior to submission.
    • Extensions on Assessments:  An application for Assessment Extension should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer.  Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date.  Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine medical, compassionate or extenuating circumstances.
    • Failure to submit: Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade. Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late. Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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