MEDIC ST 1501 - Foundations of Medicine

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2022

This course will present an integrated curriculum across the four domains of medicine (Science & Scholarship, Health & Society, Professionalism & Leadership and Clinical Practice). A number of curriculum threads will also be introduced including Indigenous health and Inter-professional learning (IPL). As part of Science and Scholarship, the course will deliver an overview of the human body and arrangement into systems dedicated to core functions (respiration, metabolism, movement, reproduction and defence) with a focus on the molecular and cellular basis of health and disease. In Clinical Practice students will be introduced a simulated clinical environment and scenarios with an overview of the major aspects of history taking and physical examination, bedside, laboratory and imaging investigations and appropriate behaviour in the clinical setting. The Health and Society domain will introduce basic principles of epidemiology, healthcare systems in the local, national and international setting, and public health initiatives required to maintain health at the population level. In the Professionalism and Leadership domain, students will be introduced to legal and ethical basis of medical practice and bioethical principles guiding the application of medical research and scientific advances. Students will also explore professional aspects of scientific writing and reflective practice. The course will be delivered in a multimodal format, including online content delivery, face to face lectures, scenario-based learning, workshops and practical sessions. Assessment will include written assignments, oral presentations, online quizzes, demonstration of clinical and professional skills and written tests.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MEDIC ST 1501
    Course Foundations of Medicine
    Coordinating Unit Medicine
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 12
    Contact Weekly lectures, workshops, practicals, tutorials, seminars and SBL sessions
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Restrictions Restricted to Bachelor of Medical Studies students only
    Course Description This course will present an integrated curriculum across the four domains of medicine (Science & Scholarship, Health & Society, Professionalism & Leadership and Clinical Practice). A number of curriculum threads will also be introduced including Indigenous health and Inter-professional learning (IPL). As part of Science and Scholarship, the course will deliver an overview of the human body and arrangement into systems dedicated to core functions (respiration, metabolism, movement, reproduction and defence) with a focus on the molecular and cellular basis of health and disease.
    In Clinical Practice students will be introduced a simulated clinical environment and scenarios with an overview of the major aspects of history taking and physical examination, bedside, laboratory and imaging investigations and appropriate behaviour in the clinical setting.
    The Health and Society domain will introduce basic principles of epidemiology, healthcare systems in the local, national and international setting, and public health initiatives required to maintain health at the population level.
    In the Professionalism and Leadership domain, students will be introduced to legal and ethical basis of medical practice and bioethical principles guiding the application of medical research and scientific advances. Students will also explore professional aspects of scientific writing and reflective practice.
    The course will be delivered in a multimodal format, including online content delivery, face to face lectures, scenario-based learning, workshops and practical sessions.
    Assessment will include written assignments, oral presentations, online quizzes, demonstration of clinical and professional skills and written tests.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Viythia Katharesan

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Describe the organisation of the human body and the structure and function of the major organ systems.
    2 Explain, at a foundational level, the molecular and cellular basis of health and disease and the core processes which contribute to responding to changes in internal and external environments.
    3 Formulate mechanistic hypotheses by interpreting key data in given scenarios.
    4 Conduct medical interviews with simulated patients, using a defined framework for history taking, and display appropriate rapport and empathy
    5 Perform limited physical examinations of designated body systems in simulated patients in a professional manner.
    6 Describe and reflect on the ethical principles which form the basis of the doctor-patient relationship: beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, rights to autonomy, confidentiality and informed consent
    7 Describe expectations of a health professional and demonstrate professional capabilities and behaviours including respect for colleagues, staff and tutors and acknowledge the Indigenous peoples as traditional custodians.
    8 Investigate self-care resources and reflect on how these can assist self and peers in maintaining wellbeing
    9 Describe the structure of the Australian health system, the key concepts in public health and its role in the health of a population
    10 Identify examples of the social determinants that can affect the health of individuals, families, communities and populations
    11 Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of Indigenous peoples’ histories, cultures, identities and belief systems
    12 Identify the connections  between history and the ongoing impacts of colonisation on Indigenous health outcomes
    13 Recognise the important role played by research in the generation of knowledge for health and medicine
    14 Demonstrate foundational research skills in locating, interpreting and referencing appropriate information relevant to health and medical sciences
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1 - 13

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    4,5,6,7,9,14

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    4,5,6,7,8,9

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    5,6,7,8,9

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    10,11

    Attribute 6: Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural competency

    Graduates have an understanding of, and respect for, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, culture and knowledge.

    10,11

    Attribute 7: Digital capabilities

    Graduates are well prepared for living, learning and working in a digital society.

    1, 7-14

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    5,6,7,8,9,11
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    All students should factor in the cost of their own laptop device. Required learning resources and readings will be provided on-line via the learning management system (MyUni). There are no prescribed textbooks, but students will need to access various online resources (including the Australian Medicines Handbook, Therapeutic guidelines and Up-to-date (available via the University library). Students may need to access other online resources via the University library
    Recommended Resources
    There are a range of recommended textbooks and peer-reviewed articles - the details of which will be communicated by course educators via the learning management system (MyUni). Students are encouraged to choose their resources that take their learning style into account. Materials such as online videos, presentations and documents will be provided via the Learning Management System (MyUni). Students may be required to submit written assignments via a Turnitin digital submission portal which can be accessed through learning management system (MyUni).
    Online Learning

    The learning management system (MyUni) will be used as a digital platform to:

    - host online teaching activities, resources including supporting documents, videos and external web-links.

    - help students navigate learning pathways through the course.

    - communicate course and program related announcements to students.

    - promote student discussion and communication via digital discussion boards.

    - enable students to access and complete formative and summative quizzes and submit assignments.

    These resources will be available for the duration of the program.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Lectures
    Key mechanisms, concepts and issues relating to the four domains of medicine (science & scholarship, clinical practice, health & society and professionalism & leadership) will be explained and discussed via a series of online video resources and in-person presentations.

    Bench-to-bedside research seminars
    Medical research seminars will feature invited world-class research scientists who will speak about their cutting-edge research relevant to the course theme.  These sessions will give opportunity for students to learn more about the process of medical research and how new knowledge is translated into clinical practice.

    Practical laboratories
    Multi-disciplinary interactive practical classes will provide students with opportunity to explore the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the human body.

    Scenario-based (SBL) workshops
    Scenarios will relate to common and important medical conditions, population and community health issues relevant to the course themes. Scenarios will be introduced (via MyUni) in the first week of each fortnightly block of teaching and then explored in detail by student groups within scenario-based learning sessions in the subsequent week. These sessions are designed to develop skills in hypothesis formulation, testing and clinical reasoning in addition to consolidating and applying knowledge across the various domains of medicine.

    Medical Practice workshops
    These workshops integrate teaching across clinical practice and professionalism and leadership domains and are designed for students to practice and gain competency in clinical examination techniques and concurrently apply professionalism and leadership skills. This structure models the importance of integrated medical practice in a clinical environment.

    Professionalism and Leadership workshops
    Facilitator guided workshops will help students to develop academic research and writing skills; and to develop skills to foster self-care, wellbeing and peer support.

    Health and Society workshops
    Tutor guided group workshops are designed to facilitate learning by providing opportunity for students to work collaboratively to explore themes including the role of epidemiology in population health, prevention and health promotion, assessing risk, the determinants of health and how these affect people’s health in both an indigenous and global context.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Assessment Weighting %
    Hurdle Requirement
    Course Learning Outcome(s) being assessed
    Weekly Quizzes Summative * No 1, 2, 6, 9, 10
    Mid-semester test (including DAQ) Formative - No 1,2,3,6,9,10
    End of semester test (including DAQ) Summative * Yes 1,2,3,6,9,10

    Indigenous Health Assignment

    (made up of 9 reflections + a quiz)

    Summative NGP Yes 10, 11,12
    Population Health Assignment Summative * Yes 9, 10, 14
    Clinical Competency 1 & 2 Formative - No 4, 5
    Clinical Competency 3 & 4 Summative NGP Yes 4, 5
    Vital Signs Assessment Summative NGP Yes 5
    Hand Hygiene Learning Module Summative NGP Yes 5
    Academic Integrity (incl. referencing) Summative NGP Yes 7, 14
    Oral Case Presentation Formative - - 3,4,5,7
    Mental Health First Aid Summative NGP Yes 8
    Professional Values Reflection Summative NGP Yes 6,7,8
    Contemporary Media Case Reflection Summative NGP Yes 6,7,8
    Professional Behaviour (timely submission of assignments, satisfactory active attendance and appropriate behaviour)

    Summative Components & Formative Components

    Yes 7
    *See Assessment Related Requirements below for further details
    Assessment Related Requirements

    The following minimum requirements are necessary for progression from the course:

    Science and Scholarship Domain: Students must attain at least a passing grade in the summatively assessed components (i.e. composite score of End of Semester Test (weighted at 80%) + Weekly Quiz average score (weighted at 20%)). It is a hurdle requirement for students to achieve a passing grade in the End of Semester test. The grade for the End of Semester Test will be determined by applying an appropriate standard setting method.

    Health and Society Domain: At least a mark of 50% in the summatively assessed components (Population Health Assignment). Satisfactory performance in Indigenous Health Assignment.

    Clinical Practice: Acceptable performance in clinical competencies 3 & 4, completion of competencies in Hand Hygiene Learning Module and Vital Signs Assessment.

    Professionalism and Leadership: Active contribution of small group teaching sessions, including attendance (80%); timely submission of assignments; completion of the Mental Health First Aid Module; appropriate academic referencing, and no substantiated record of unprofessional behaviour.

    Assessment Detail

    Assessment will be conducted under the GS8 Grade Scheme in recognition of the Integrated, Domain-led nature of the Medical Program curriculum. In addition, the program uses the philosophy of “Assessment for Learning”, where the learner is guided by assessment, and assessment feedback is used to shape and determine the learner’s progress.

    The integrated nature of the curriculum, with four Domains: Science and Scholarship; Clinical Practice; Health and Society, and Professionalism and Leadership, means that the successful learner must achieve a minimum standard of performance in each Domain, and deficiencies in an individual Domain cannot be compensated by performance in another.

    Weekly Quizzes: Each week, students will undertake a quiz that tests and consolidates the knowledge of that week’s learning. Questions can be drawn from across the Domains, with approximate weight related to the content taught during the week.

    Mid Semester Test (Formative): At mid semester, students will undertake a test for formative purposes. Material from across the curriculum will be assessed, via Multiple Choice, Short Answer, and Data Analysis Question formats.

    End of Semester Test: At the end of semester, students will undertake a test for summative purposes. Material from across the curriculum will be assessed, via Multiple Choice, Short Answer, and Data Analysis Question formats.

    Indigenous Health Assignment (NGP – Hurdle): Students will be required to complete 9 reflections and a final quiz, which are incorporated into the Foundations of Indigenous Health and Society module. Satisfactory completion of this assignment is required for progression.

    Population Health Assignment: A Population Health Assignment incorporating learnings from the Domain and a presentation.

    Clinical Competencies (Formative and NGP – Hurdle): Various clinical competencies will be assessed across the semester. Students will be required to demonstrate competency in a range of basic clinical skills including history taking and physical examination, bedside, laboratory and imaging investigations and appropriate behaviour in the clinical setting

    Appropriate Academic Integrity (NGP – Hurdle): Students will be required to reference appropriately across their submitted work. Satisfactory performance is required for progression.

    Oral Case Presentation (Formative): Students will develop and practice skills in case presentation.

    Mental Health First Aid (NGP – Hurdle): Students will be required to undertake the Mental Health First Aid program. Satisfactory completion of the module is required for progression.

    Professional Values Reflection (NGP - Hurdle): Students will write an individual reflection of 600 words on professionalism. Satisfactory performance will be required for progression.

    Contemporary Media Case Reflection (NGP – Hurdle):
    Students will write an individual reflection of 500 words on  a current media topic. Satisfactory performance will be required for progression.

    Professional Behaviour (Formative and NGP – Hurdle): Students will be required to demonstrate appropriate professional behaviour, as evidenced by timely submission of assignments, satisfactory active attendance at small group teaching sessions, and no unprofessional behaviour. Satisfactory performance is required for progression.
    Submission
    Written assignments submitted online via TURNITIN, on-line quizzes with e-marking.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    GS8 (Coursework Grade Scheme)
    Grade Description
    CN Continuing
    FNS Fail No Submission
    NFE No Formal Examination
    F Fail
    NGP Non Graded Pass
    P Pass
    C Credit
    D Distinction
    HD High Distinction
    RP Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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