FOOD SC 3580WT - Food Processing, Preservation & Packaging Techniques III

Waite Campus - Semester 1 - 2024

This course provides students with an extensive understanding of food manufacturing, processing techniques, and preservation methods along with principles of packaging. This comprehensive course integrates knowledge from diverse areas, namely chemical, microbiological, nutritional, and engineering aspects of food processing and preservation. The first half of the course introduces students to the range of processing techniques that are used in food manufacturing. This includes an exploration of the principles of each process, the processing equipment used, operating conditions, and the effects of processing on food-contaminating microorganisms. The latter half of the course focuses on various food preservation methods applicable to diverse food categories, including fresh fruits and vegetables, grains and pulses, fish, red meat, and milk. Additionally, the course delves into the principles of packaging, linking it to processing, preservation, distribution, and promotion of food products. Students will understand the role of different packaging materials in relation to food safety, quality, and shelf life. The course also considers the National Packaging Targets, emphasizing the goal of achieving a circular economy for packaging. Practical exercises, workshops/tutorials, and team-based activities will further enhance student experience, providing a hands-on approach to commonly applied technologies and Good Manufacturing Practices in compliance with government regulations.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code FOOD SC 3580WT
    Course Food Processing, Preservation & Packaging Techniques III
    Coordinating Unit Food Science
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Waite Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites FOOD SC 1000WT, FOOD SC 2502WT
    Course Description This course provides students with an extensive understanding of food manufacturing, processing techniques, and preservation methods along with principles of packaging. This comprehensive course integrates knowledge from diverse areas, namely chemical, microbiological, nutritional, and engineering aspects of food processing and preservation.

    The first half of the course introduces students to the range of processing techniques that are used in food manufacturing. This includes an exploration of the principles of each process, the processing equipment used, operating conditions, and the effects of processing on food-contaminating microorganisms. The latter half of the course focuses on various food preservation methods applicable to diverse food categories, including fresh fruits and vegetables, grains and pulses, fish, red meat, and milk.

    Additionally, the course delves into the principles of packaging, linking it to processing, preservation, distribution, and promotion of food products. Students will understand the role of different packaging materials in relation to food safety, quality, and shelf life. The course also considers the National Packaging Targets, emphasizing the goal of achieving a circular economy for packaging.

    Practical exercises, workshops/tutorials, and team-based activities will further enhance student experience, providing a hands-on approach to commonly applied technologies and Good Manufacturing Practices in compliance with government regulations.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Hayriye Bozkurt

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Describe the principles of the basic unit operations used in food processing and preservation, engaging with different traditions and practices.
    2. Identify the principles and applications of packaging, including material selection, in relation to food safety, shelf life, and environmental considerations, considering their impacts on diverse global contexts.
    3. Analyze and evaluate specific food processing, preservation, and packaging operations for selected food products, using critical thinking to optimize processing conditions and mitigate potential challenges.
    4. Apply knowledge of food processing, preservation, and packaging to develop a specific food product,
    5. Evaluate the implications of processing, preservation, and packaging techniques on the physical, chemical, microbiological, and nutritional quality of foods.
    6. Work collaboratively in diverse teams to communicate effectively, demonstrate leadership, comply with government regulations pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practices.
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Several resources will be required to facilitate learning and teaching:

    Digital Resources:

    Online Learning Platform (MyUni): MyUni will be extensively used for sharing lecture slides, supplementary reading materials, video resources, and for conducting online assessments. All students must have reliable access to the internet to utilize MyUni.

    Digital Readings and E-books: A variety of e-books and online articles will be recommended throughout the course to supplement the learning material. Links to these resources will be provided on the MyUni platform.

    Software: The course will require the use of SPSS and Foodworks software for certain tasks and assessments. Details regarding how to access these programs will be provided in advance.

    Textbooks:

    Highly Recommended Textbooks include:

    Food Processing Technology: Principles and Practice, 4th Ed. Edited by P.J. Fellows.
    Handbook of Food Engineering, 3rd Ed. Edited by Dennis R. Heldman.
    Food Science, 5th Ed. Potter, N.N., and Hotchkiss, J.H. Springer, New York.
    Handbook of Food Preservation, 3rd Edition, Edited By M. Shafiur Rahman
    Food Packaging: Principles and Practice, 3rd Ed. Edited by Gordon L Robertson.
    Modern Food Microbiology, 7th Ed. Jay, J.M., M.J. Loessner, and D.A. Golden. Springer, New York.
    Copies of these textbooks can be found in both the Barr Smith and Waite Libraries. They can also be purchased from the UniBook Shop at the North Terrace Campus.

    Useful Websites:

    A list of beneficial websites will be provided for students to explore various topics related to food standards, preservation methods, and food safety. These include resources from Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), Google Scholar, Pub Med, National Center for Home Food Preservation, and others. Links to these websites will be shared on MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    In addition to the required resources, the following resources are recommended to further support learning and teaching in this integrated course on Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging Techniques:

    Reading Lists:

    Supplementary reading lists will be provided periodically to delve deeper into specific topics. These may include research papers, industry reports, and other scholarly articles, which can be accessed through the university library's digital databases.

    Web Links:

    Various web links to helpful resources such as food industry news, processing techniques, preservation methods, packaging innovations, and more will be shared via MyUni. These can provide real-world context to the theoretical concepts discussed in the course.

    Library Resources:

    The university's Barr Smith and Waite Libraries have a rich collection of books, e-books, and journals relevant to food science and technology. Students are encouraged to make use of these resources for further reading and research.

    Essay Writing Guides and Study Guides:

    Guidelines and tips for effective essay writing and study techniques will be made available through MyUni. These resources can be of great help in preparing assignments and for exam revision.

    Referencing Guides:

    Proper citation and referencing are crucial in academic work. The university's referencing guides, which detail various referencing styles such as APA, Harvard, and Vancouver, will be available for students on MyUni.

    Computing Laboratories:

    The university's computing laboratories equipped with the necessary software (SPSS and Foodworks) will be accessible for students who need them for their practical work or assignments.

    IT Support:

    IT support will be available to help with any technical difficulties encountered while using the online learning platform, accessing digital resources, or utilizing university software.


    Turnitin as an Educational Tool:

    Turnitin will be used not only as a plagiarism detection tool but also as an educational tool. It will enable students to review their work for potential plagiarism issues before submitting their final assignments. Instructions on how to use Turnitin effectively will be provided via MyUni.
    Online Learning
    Online Learning:

    This course on Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging Techniques III will incorporate various online resources to facilitate and enhance learning experiences:

    MyUni Platform:

    MyUni is the university's main online learning system. It will be used extensively throughout this course to provide a wide range of resources and interactive learning opportunities. MyUni will house the following:

    Lecture Slides and Recordings: All lecture materials including slides and recordings will be made available on MyUni soon after each lecture. This will allow students to revisit the lecture content at their own pace and convenience.

    Reading Material: Supplementary digital readings and e-books will be uploaded on MyUni. These resources will supplement lecture content and enhance understanding of the course topics.

    Quizzes: Online quizzes will be conducted through MyUni to assess understanding and reinforce learning. The quizzes will typically follow completion of certain topics.

    Discussion Boards: Discussion boards will be facilitated on MyUni to promote student engagement and peer learning. Students can post questions, share resources, and engage in topic-related discussions.

    Announcements: Important course-related announcements, updates, reminders, and feedback will be regularly posted on MyUni.

    Assessments: All assessments, including assignment submissions and online exams, will be conducted through MyUni. Detailed instructions, deadlines, and feedback will be provided on the platform.

    External Web Links:

    A variety of external web links will also be provided throughout the course, including links to online articles, industry reports, useful websites related to food processing, preservation, and packaging, etc. These resources can help students gain a more practical and real-world understanding of the topics discussed.

    The online resources will be used continuously throughout the course to provide a comprehensive, flexible, and interactive learning experience. Students are encouraged to actively engage with these resources, ask questions, and contribute to discussions. All these resources are designed to assist in mastering the course content and achieving the learning outcomes.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging course will adopt a blended approach, combining traditional and innovative teaching methods to facilitate a dynamic learning environment.

    Lectures: The course will start with lectures, which are designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of food processing, preservation, and packaging. These lectures will provide foundational knowledge on which further practicals and workshops will build. Each topic will be interconnected, enabling students to gain a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Lecture topics will include;

    1. Introduction to Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging: An Integrated Approach
    2. Fundamentals of Food Structure: Implications for Processing and Preservation
    3. Essential Food Processing Techniques: Analysis of Unit Operations
    4. Impact of Processing on Food Quality: Microbial Safety and Nutritional Aspects
    5. Food Processing Technologies: Heat-Based
    6. Food Processing Technologies: Ambient Temperature
    7. Food Processing Technologies: Fermentation
    8. Waste Management in Food Processing: Environmental and Regulatory Considerations
    9. Emerging Trends in Food Processing: New Technologies and Innovations
    10. Principles of Food Preservation: Chemical, Biological, and Physical Techniques-Part 1
    11. Principles of Food Preservation: Chemical, Biological, and Physical Techniques-Part 2
    12. Advanced Food Preservation Strategies: High-Pressure Processing, Irradiation, and Pulsed Electric Fields
    13. The Effect of Preservation Techniques on Food Safety and Quality-Part 1
    14. The Effect of Preservation Techniques on Food Safety and Quality-Part 2
    15. Understanding and Enhancing the Shelf Life of Food: The Role of Preservation
    16. The Science of Food Packaging: Principles and Material Considerations
    17. Packaging in Relation to Food Preservation: Safety, Quality, and Shelf Life
    18. The Role of Packaging in Post-Processing Operations: Regulatory and Practical Perspectives
    19. The Interface of Food Processing and Preservation: Impacts on New Product Development
    20. Navigating Regulations: Compliance in Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging
    21. Sustainable Practices in Food Processing, Preservation, and Packaging: Environmental and Ethical Perspectives
    22. Exam Revision

    Practicals: Practical sessions will be implemented to provide students with hands-on experience and to help them understand the theoretical concepts learned in lectures more effectively. Each practical session is designed to relate closely with the lecture topics, reinforcing the concepts taught. For instance, after discussing the topic of "Fundamentals of Food Structure", students will be engaging in a practical session on "Food Structure - Angel Cake", allowing them to apply the concepts learned. Practical will be;

    1. Food Structure - Angel Cake
    2. Reformulation of Mayonnaise
    3. Rheological Analysis
    4. Fermentation - Sauerkraut and Yoghurt
    5. Measurement of pH and Water Activity
    6. Additives - Bread Making
    7. Freezing of Food Samples
    8. Drying of Fruits and Vegetables
    9. Canning
    10. Mozzarella Cheese making
    11. QC Investigation - Biscuits
    12. Packaging Material Analysis

    Tutorials/Workshops: These are designed to build upon the material covered in lectures and developed in practical sessions. Students will have the opportunity to analyze data from practical exercises, perform calculations related to the processing and preservation techniques discussed in lectures, and engage in group activities that facilitate the application of the knowledge gained. For example, after engaging in practical sessions such as "Freezing of Food Samples" and "Canning", workshops on "Freezing Process Calculations" and "Process Lethality Calculations" will allow students to delve deeper into the scientific and technical aspects of these preservation methods. Tutorials/Workshops will be;

    1. Impacts of Structure and Quality on Food Processing and Preservation
    2. Analysis of Practical Data from Food Structure
    3. Rheological Properties of Foods and their Role in Processing
    4. Analysis of Practical Data from Rheological Analysis
    5. Reformulation of Food Products in the context of Preservation
    6. Assessments and Feedback
    7. Analysis of Practical Data from Food Reformulation
    8. Interconnected Role of Food Processing in Preservation and Packaging
    9. Analysis of Practical Data from Food Preservation
    10. Freezing Process Calculations
    11. Process Lethality Calculations
    12. Assessments, Feedback, and Exam Revision

    Support Measures: The course will also include structured support to aid students in developing academic literacies and research skills. Regular assessments, feedback, and exam revision sessions will be conducted to support students' learning progression. Tailored assistance will be provided for particular student groups. For example, international students or those new to university study may benefit from additional tutorials or one-on-one sessions to ensure they are comfortable with course material and academic expectations.

    Interdisciplinary Approach: The updated course encourages an interdisciplinary approach, where food science principles are intertwined with technological advancements, industry regulations, and sustainability concerns. This comprehensive, integrated approach provides students with a broader understanding of the field, preparing them for real-world challenges in the food industry.

    The overall aim of this approach is to create a nurturing and conducive learning environment that promotes the development of both theoretical knowledge and practical skills. This approach will prepare students for a career in the food industry by equipping them with a comprehensive understanding of food processing, preservation, and packaging.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Contact sessions (semester)
    Type Number of sessions Duration of each session (hr) Total hours
    Lectures 22 1 22
    Tutorials/Class Exercises 6 1 6
    Workshops 6 1 6
    Practicals 12 3 36
    Other assessment not incl. in other contact time (e.g. mid-semester test) 0
    Final exam 3 3
    Other (e.g., field trips, project work) 0
    73

    Non-contact (semester)
    Type Number of sessions Anticipated time (hr) Total hours
    Weekly reading & other study (hours/lecture) 12 2 24
    Preparation of assessment - Online quizzes 4 4 16
    Preparation of assessment - Written reports 3 4 12
    Preparation of assessment - Poster 1 8 8
    Exam preparation 15 15
    Other (please specify):
    75


    Total workload (hrs/semester):148

    Workload/week (hr):12

    Expected workload (hrs/week):
    3 unit course 12
    6 unit course 24
    9 unit course 36
    12 unit course 48
    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

    Specific Course Requirements
    1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour tutorial/workshop and 1 x 2-3 hour practical per week.

    Lectures are used to deliver theoretical content relevant to the specified course objectives. Lectures include the opportunity for open discussion, questions and problem solving activities.

    Tutorials/workshops aim to develop and support the material covered in the lectures as well as provide a forum for acquiring skills and knowledge necessary to complete the assessment tasks. The tutorials take the form of class discussions, demonstrations and problems-solving activities. Additionally, student groups are required to present their Poster to the class during an extended tutorial time.

    Practicals further develop knowledge covered in the lectures, and are used to enable students to investigate and achieve skill-related outcomes.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Assessment type
    (Formative or Summative)
    Assessment weighting % (Summative tasks must add up to 100%) Hurdle Requirement
    (Yes or No)
    Course learning outcomes being assessed
    Practical reports Formative & summative 30% in total (3x10%) No 3,4,5
    Online Quizzes x 4 Formative & summative 20% in total
    (4 x 5%)
    No 1-6
    Poster and group presentation Formative & summative 20% No 3,4,5,6
    Online Exam Summative 30% No 1-6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Compulsory Attendance at Practicals and Tutorials: Attendance at all practical sessions and tutorials is compulsory. These sessions provide hands-on experience and applied learning that is critical to understanding the course material. Missing a practical or tutorial session may impact your ability to successfully complete related assessment tasks.

    Practical Reports: This is a core component of the course, contributing significantly to your final grade. It is also crucial for reinforcing students’ understanding of the theory and techniques discussed in the lectures and practical sessions.

    Group Project and Poster Presentation: Participation in the group project is mandatory. It is an essential part of this course, assessing students’ability to apply learned concepts and work effectively in a team.

    Online Quizzes: Online quizzes are to be completed within the specified timeframe. They will assess students’ understanding of the lecture material and should be completed individually.
    Assessment Detail

    This course will include four summative assessment tasks, each designed to align with the learning outcomes and measure different aspects of your understanding, application, and skills. Here is a brief overview of each task:

    Quizzes (Weightage: 20%):

    Online quizzes will be held after completion of every few topics. These quizzes will evaluate the students' understanding and retention of the material covered in the lectures.
    These quizzes will be a mix of multiple-choice questions, true/false questions, and short answer questions.
    Feedback will be provided after the submission of each quiz to aid in students' learning.

    Practical Reports (Weightage: 30%):

    Students will be required to submit three practical reports (each 10%) based on the laboratory exercises and workshops.
    These reports will assess students' ability to apply theoretical concepts to real-world scenarios, their understanding of food processing, preservation, and packaging techniques, and their ability to analyze and interpret data.
    Feedback on these reports will help students understand where they can improve in their practical understanding and data interpretation.

    Group Project Poster and Presentation (Weightage: 20%):

    A group project will assess students' ability to work in teams, apply course content in a practical context, and communicate effectively.
    The project will involve developing a plan for processing, preserving, and packaging a specific food product, addressing the considerations discussed throughout the course.
    Groups will present their project to the class, providing an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding and receive peer and instructor feedback.

    Final Exam (Weightage: 30%):

    The final exam will be a comprehensive test covering all the topics discussed in the course.
    The exam will assess students' overall understanding of food processing, preservation, and packaging, and their ability to integrate and apply the concepts learned.
    The exam will include a mix of short answer and essay questions.

    The total weightage for the summative assessments is 100%. All assessments comply with the university's Assessment for Coursework Programs policy and are designed to support and measure the achievement of the course learning outcomes.
    Submission
    E-Submission: All assessments, including quizzes, practical reports, and the group project, will be submitted online. This allows for easy tracking of your submissions and helps ensure that your work is securely received. Detailed instructions for how to submit your work will be provided for each assessment task. The final exam will also be conducted online, though it will consist of both multiple-choice and written answer questions.

    E-Marking: Online quizzes and multiple-choice questions in the final exam will be marked electronically, providing instant feedback and allowing for quick turnaround times for results. For the practical reports, group project, and written answers in the final exam, while submission will be electronic, grading will be conducted by course coordinator with feedback and marks released once grading is completed.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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