MUSST 2003 - Instrumental Music Pedagogy 2

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

Introduction to the principal elements of instrumental music pedagogy. It is designed to equip those who may wish to undertake a limited amount of instrumental teaching with the knowledge and understanding to work empathetically and effectively with pupils, especially in a one-to-one situation. Lecture topics include the principles and philosophies underpinning the discipline, the structure and history of the profession, its examination systems and some if its recognised methodologies. Tutorials in string, wind, keyboard and other instruments concentrate on instrumental specific approaches at elementary levels with a pupil-centred focus.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MUSST 2003
    Course Instrumental Music Pedagogy 2
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 2 hours per week
    Incompatible GENMUS 2003
    Assumed Knowledge Well-established instrumental performance skills & theoretical knowledge
    Restrictions Available to BMus, BMusEd & BMusSt students only
    Course Description Introduction to the principal elements of instrumental music pedagogy. It is designed to equip those who may wish to undertake a limited amount of instrumental teaching with the knowledge and understanding to work empathetically and effectively with pupils, especially in a one-to-one situation. Lecture topics include the principles and philosophies underpinning the discipline, the structure and history of the profession, its examination systems and some if its recognised methodologies. Tutorials in string, wind, keyboard and other instruments concentrate on instrumental specific approaches at elementary levels with a pupil-centred focus.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Rodney Smith

    Mr Rodney Smith 
    Available to students: By appointment
    Location: Schulz 1112
    Phone number:  8313 5785
    Contact email:  rodney.smith@adelaide.edu.au
     

    Ms Ruth Saffir 
    Available to students: By appointment
    Location: Schulz 919
    Phone number: 8313 3762
    Contact email: ruth.saffir@adelaide.edu.au
     
    Music office location: Schulz level 2

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    1. The course seeks to give students knowledge and understanding of the relatedness of broad theoretical principles and processes of music education and their application in the field of beginning level instrumental/vocal music instruction for pupils of various age groups.

    2. The course seeks to give students a knowledge and understanding of appropriate specialist beginning to elementary-level instrumental/vocal teaching materials for various age groups in the individual teaching mode.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2.
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1, 2.
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1, 2.
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Booklists and other required sources of information will be distributed throughout the course.

    Recommended Resources


    Tait,M. and Haack,P. 1984. Principles and Processes of Music Education. New York and London. Teachers College Press. Columbia University.

    Beetlestone, F. 1998. Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching. Buckingham and Philadelphia. Open University Press.

    Craft, A., Jeffrey, R., Leibling, M. 2001. Creativity in Education. London and New York. Continuum

    Gumm, A. 2003. Music Teaching Style: Moving beyond tradition. Galesville. Meredith Music Publications.

    Crozier, R., Scaife, N., and Marks, A. 2004. All Together! Teaching music in groups. London. Associated Board.

    Baker-Jordan, M. 2003. Practical Piano Pedagogy. Miami. Warner Bros. Publications

    Proceedings of the Australasian Piano Pedagogy Conferences, 1993 – 2009.

    Lazear, David G. 1999. Eight ways of knowing : teaching for multiple intelligences : a handbook of techniques for expanding intelligence. Hawker Brownlow Education,

    Brice, Mary 2004 The Unfolding Human Potential: Dalcroze Eurhythmics. Editions Papillon, Geneva

    Landis, Beth and Carder, Polly The eclectic curriculum in American music education: contributions of Dalcroze, Kodaly, and Orff Washington : Music Educators National Conference, 1972

    Brophy, Jere E. c1998. Motivating students to learn / Boston: McGraw-Hill
    Online Learning

    Resources and announcements may be posted on MyUni under MUSST 2003

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Lectures with handouts and limited discussion cover the relatedness of broad theoretical principles and processes of music education to their application in the field of beginning level instrumental/vocal music instruction for pupils of various age groups.

    Tutorials develop and broaden, through discussion, knowledge and understanding of appropriate materials for beginning level instrumental/vocal music instruction for pupils of various age groups in the individual teaching mode.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    During the semester attendance at lectures and tutorials, plus approximately 7 hours preparation/teaching observation per week, will result in approximately 9 hours workload per week.

    Learning Activities Summary

    12 x 1hr lectures on the principles and processes of music education, the structure of the profession, the sources of materials, concepts and strategies of instrumental/vocal teaching, creativity in pupils and the place of instrumental/vocal teaching in a portfolio musical career.

    12 x 1hr tutorials focusing on the evaluation of methods, repertoire, lesson planning, teaching aids and music reading with pupils of various ages in individual tuition at a beginning and elementary level.

    6 lessons given by experienced teachers on or off campus to be observed and logged.

    WeekDateLecturerTopic
    Week 1 Ruth Saffir Why methodologies matter.
    Week 2 Rodney Smith A studio teaching profession? A portfolio career?
    Week 3 Ruth Saffir Tapping the intelligences
    Week 4 Rodney Smith The music experience – describing thinking, feeling, sharing.
    Week 5 Ruth Saffir Am I on my student’s wavelength? Aural, visual and kinaesthetic learning.
    Week 6 Rodney Smith Studio teaching – diagnosis, congruency and teaching styles.
    Week 7 Ruth Saffir Why are we here – motivation and goals.
    Week 8 Rodney Smith Studio teaching – learning, planning and evaluation.
    Week 9 Ruth Saffir Oh, so that’s why! Theory and practice enmeshed.
    Week 10 Rodney Smith Creativity and imagination in music pupils
    Week 11 Ruth Saffir Psychologist, parent or teacher? The teacher as significant person.
    Week 12 Rodney Smith The place of examination systems in studio teaching.
    Specific Course Requirements


    Active and positive participation in 100% of required lectures, tutorials, workshops or other practically based courses is expected.
    Small Group Discovery Experience

    Tutorials develop and broaden, through discussion, knowledge and understanding of appropriate materials for beginning level instrumental/vocal music instruction for pupils of various age groups in the individual teaching mode. At least 25% of these are conducted in small group discovery mode.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    AssessmentWeightingDue DateOutcomes being assessed
    Portfolio of annotated teaching techniques and materials and teaching observations. 70% This assessment addresses Learning Objective 2.
    1000-word Essay on lecture topics 30% This assessment addresses Learning Objective 1.
    Assessment Related Requirements


    LECTURE, TUTORIAL, WORKSHOP OR PRACTICALLY BASED COURSE PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE EXPECTATIONS

    Active and positive participation in 100% of required lectures, tutorials, workshops or other practically based courses is expected.

    LEAVE

    Sick Leave, Compassionate Leave or Professional Development Leave may, upon application using the relevant Leave of Absence form, be approved by the course coordinator or relevant staff member. (See Leave descriptors in the Conservatorium’s Participation and Attendance Policy for details.)

    PENALTY

    Although active and positive participation in 100% of required lectures, tutorials, workshops and practically based classes is expected, any student who attends less than 100% of required classes without approved Leave will receive a 2% penalty for each unapproved absence. The penalties will be applied to the final total percentage mark for the year for the relevant component - ie after all other assessments have been completed and calculated.

    Arrival after the scheduled starting time or departure before the scheduled finishing time may, at the lecturer or Co-ordinator’s discretion, be regarded as an unapproved absence.

    Assessment Detail

    Guides to the layout, content and categorisation of the portfolio will be distributed in tutorials.

    Sample essay topics will be provided and discussed during tutorials.

    Submission


    The portfolio and essay should be submitted to the Music Office on the due date, with the appropriate cover sheet and declaration. Late submission will incur a penalty deduction of 2% per weekday from the assessed mark of the complete submitted work.

    It is expected all assessments including presentations, listening tests, practical examinations, written examinations and assignments will be undertaken and submitted as required (see Teaching and Learning Activities). However, Assessment Task Extension, Replacement Examination, Additional Assessment and Deferred Modified Arrangements are available on medical, compassionate or extenuating grounds. Full information concerning these matters can be found on the University website under University Policies and Procedures, Modified Arrangements for University Coursework Assessment Policy, at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/3303/

    Where possible it is advisable to discuss the matter with the lecturer concerned in the first instance.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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