MANAGEMT 7112 - Marketing Strategy

North Terrace Campus - Summer - 2014

Marketing means many things to many people but one issue is certain, it is the driving force that separates successful organisations from unsuccessful ones in the current fast-changing, global, competitive environment. This course explores what it means to be truly market-driven and to fully realise the power that marketing has to drive your organisation forward. It will explore a variety of issues, including why being market-driven pays off, how to effectively understand the market, how to analyse marketing competencies, how to make strategic choices, how to create and deliver value to customers and finally how to measure marketing effectiveness. These questions will be examined through interactive class discussions, case studies and video cases on leading international organisations.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7112
    Course Marketing Strategy
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Summer
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Prerequisites MANAGEMT 7104
    Course Description Marketing means many things to many people but one issue is certain, it is the driving force that separates successful organisations from unsuccessful ones in the current fast-changing, global, competitive environment. This course explores what it means to be truly market-driven and to fully realise the power that marketing has to drive your organisation forward. It will explore a variety of issues, including why being market-driven pays off, how to effectively understand the market, how to analyse marketing competencies, how to make strategic choices, how to create and deliver value to customers and finally how to measure marketing effectiveness. These questions will be examined through interactive class discussions, case studies and video cases on leading international organisations.
    Course Staff
    Name: Professor John Fahy
    Location: Room, Pulteney Street Building
    Telephone: 8303
    email: john.fahy@ul.ie; john@johnfahy.net
    Course Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au; www.johnfahy.net
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Date Course Content
    January 8 Is your company market driven?
    January 10 Do you know what customers want?
    January 12 Building an effective customer value proposition
    January 15        Developing the customer value proposition
    January 17 Creating an integrated marketing strategy
    January 19 Group Presentations & Examination
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    By the end of this course you will be able to,
          
    2.1.1     Understand what it means to be a market-driven organisation
         
    2.1.2     Understand the critical role of market insights
           
    2.1.3     Conduct a strategic marketing analysis of a company/industry
           
    2.1.4     Develop skills in making superior market choices
           
    2.1.5     Develop an effective customer value proposition
           
    2.1.6     Develop an effective marketing strategy

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text Books (s)
    Strategy from the Outside In: Profiting from Customer Value (2010), George Day &
    Christine Moorman, New York: McGraw-Hill
    Foundations of Marketing, 4th edition (2012), David Jobber & John Fahy,
    London: McGraw-Hill.

    Cases
    Buchanan & Simmons (2009) Trouble Brews at Starbucks
    Mukund (2003) Tesco: The Customer Relationship Management Champion
    Moon & Herman (2002) Aqualisa Quartz: Simply a Better Shower
    Renault, Dalsace & Ulaga (2010) Michelin Fleet Solutions: From Selling Tires to Selling Kilometres

    Bart, Chandon, Sweldens & Seabra de Sousa (2010) Renova Toilet Paper: Avant Garde
    Marketing in a Commoditized Category

    Readings
    Aaker (2012), ‘Win the Brand Relevance Battle and then Build Competitive Barriers,
    'California Management Review, 43-57
    Barwise, P. & S. Meehan (2004), ‘Don’t be Unique, Be Better,
    ’Sloan Management Review, Summer, 23-26.
    Bertini, M. & L. Wathieu (2010), ‘How to Stop Customers Fixating on Price,
    ’Harvard Business Review, May, 84-91.
    Comstock, B., R. Gulati & S. Liguori (2010), ‘Unleashing the Power of Marketing,’
    Harvard Business Review, October, 90-98.
    Dixon, M., K. Freeman & N. Toman (2010), ‘Stop Trying to Delight Your Customers,’
    Harvard Business Review, July-August, 116-122.
    Gunther McGrath, R. (2012), ‘How the Growth Outliers Do It, ’ Harvard Business Review, 111-115.
    Hanssens, D., R. Rust & R. Srivastava (2009), ‘Marketing Strategy and Wall Street: Nailing Down Marketing’s Impact,’ Journal of Marketing, November, 115-118. 
    Lodish, L. and C. Mela (2007), ‘If Brands are Built Over Years, Why are the Managed over Quarters?,’ Harvard Business Review, July-August, 104-112
    McAfee, A. and E. Brynjolfsson (2012), ‘Big Data: The Management Revolution,
    ’Harvard Business Review, 60-68
    McDonald, E., H. Wilson & U. Konus (2012) ‘Better Customer Insight in Real Time,
    ’Harvard Business Review, 102-108
    McGovern, G., D. Court, J. Quelch & B. Crawford (2004), ‘Bringing Customers into the Boardroom,
    ’Harvard Business Review, November, 70-80.
    Rust, R., C. Moorman & G. Bhalla (2009), ‘Rethinking Marketing,
    ’Harvard Business Review, January-February, 94-99.
    Simon. H (1996), ‘You Don’t Have to be German to be a ‘Hidden Champion’,’
    Business Strategy Review, 1-13
    Spenner, P. & K. Freeman (2012), ‘To Keep Your Customers, Keep it Simple,
    ’Harvard Business Review, 108-114


    Recommended Resources
    Students may wish to read more widely in specific subject areas, something that the UABS wholeheartedly encourages.  There are many general texts and business books on marketing that students may find useful.  Also the following journals, magazines and newspapers should be consulted for managerially relevant articles on marketing:

    • Harvard Business Review
    • Sloan Management Review
    • California Management Review      
    • Business Horizons       
    • McKinsey Quarterly       
    • Marketing Week (UK)       
    • Economist (UK)       
    • Financial Times (UK)       
    • Wall Street Journal
    Full texts of a great many of the articles that appear in these journals can be accessed via the University of Adelaide’s library databases
    Online Learning
    Increasingly much of what you need is available online through websites containing links to articles, cases, free webinars and discussions, etc. A sample of very useful websites include,

    Marketingpower.com
    McKinsey.com
    Economist.com
    Ft.com
    Wsj.com
    Brandchannel.com
    Warc.com
    Ted.com

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course will take an applied and practical approach making extensive use of case studies, video case studies, exercises and discussions. Students will have ample opportunities to interrogate
    particular problems and put forward their own points of view.
    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary
    January 7                     Is Your Company Market Driven?
     
    Readings:
    Day & Moorman (2010); Chapters 1 & 2
    Comstock, B., R. Gulati & S. Liguori (2010), ‘Unleashing the Power of Marketing,’Harvard Business Review, October, 90-98.
    McGovern, G., D. Court, J. Quelch & B. Crawford (2004), ‘Bringing Customers into the Boardroom,’ Harvard Business Review, November, 70-80.

    Case:
    Buchanan & Simmons (2009) Trouble Brews at Starbucks
     

    January 9                     Do You Know What Customers Want?

    Readings:
    Day & Moorman (2010); Chapter 11
    McAfee, A. and E. Brynjolfsson (2012), ‘Big Data: The Management Revolution,’ Harvard
    Business Review, 60-68
    McDonald, E., H. Wilson & U. Konus (2012) ‘Better Customer Insight in Real Time,’Harvard Business Review, 102-108
    Spenner, P. & K. Freeman (2012), ‘To Keep Your Customers, Keep it Simple,’ Harvard Business Review, 108-114

    Case:
    Mukund (2003) Tesco: The Customer Relationship Management Champion
     

    January 11                   Building an Effective Customer Value Proposition

    Readings:
    Day & Moorman (2010); Chapters 3 & 4.
    Barwise, P. & S. Meehan (2004), ‘Don’t be Unique, Be Better,’ Sloan Management Review,
    Summer, 23-26.
    Dixon, M., K. Freeman & N. Toman (2010), ‘Stop Trying to Delight Your Customers,’
    Harvard Business Review, July-August, 116-122.
    Simon. H (1996), ‘You Don’t Have to be German to be a ‘Hidden Champion’,
    ’ Business Strategy Review, 1-13

    Case:
    Moon & Herman (2002) Aqualisa Quartz: Simply a Better Shower

     
    January 14                   Developing the Customer Value Proposition

    Readings:
    Day & Moorman (2010); Chapters 5 & 6.
    Aaker (2012), ‘Win the Brand Relevance Battle and then Build Competitive Barriers,’
    California Management Review, 43-57
    Bertini, M. & L. Wathieu (2010), ‘How to Stop Customers Fixating on Price,
    ’Harvard Business Review, May, 84-91.
    Gunther McGrath, R. (2012), ‘How the Growth Outliers Do It,’ Harvard Business Review, 111-115.

    Case:
    Renault, Dalsace & Ulaga (2010) Michelin Fleet Solutions: From Selling Tires to Selling Kilometres
     

    January 16                   Creating an Integrated Marketing Strategy

    Readings:
    Day & Moorman (2010); Chapters 12 & 13.
    Hanssens, D., R. Rust & R. Srivastava (2009), ‘Marketing Strategy and Wall Street: Nailing Down Marketing’s Impact,’ Journal of Marketing, November, 115-118. 
    Lodish, L. and C. Mela (2007), ‘If Brands are Built Over Years, Why are the Managed over Quarters?,’ Harvard Business Review, July-August, 104-112
    Rust, R., C. Moorman & G. Bhalla (2009), ‘Rethinking Marketing,’ Harvard Business
    Review, January-February, 94-99.

    Case:
    Bart, Chandon, Sweldens & Seabra de Sousa (2010) Renova Toilet Paper: Avant Garde
    Marketing in a Commoditized Category

     
    January 18                   Group Presentations & Final Exam

    Specific Course Requirements
    None

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessmnet Item Weight Description Due Date
    Project Presentation 10% Team Project on Marketing Performance January 18
    Group Project 20% Team Project on Marketing Performance January 18
    Examination 70% Case Study Exam January 18
    Assessment Detail
    Marketing Performance (Team Project)
                                           
    Form into teams of four. Your task is to evaluate the marketing strategy of an entity.  Feel free to interpret the brief broadly. You may wish to select as the focus of your study an organization, a brand, a political party, an individual etc. However be sure to keep the scope of your project narrow as depth is more important than breadth. What you have to do is assess the marketing strategy of
    your chosen target. What aspects of its strategy are strong (if any?), what are weak? etc.

    Produce a report of no more than eight pages in three parts.
    (a)  A brief overview of the focus of study (Weighting = 10%)
    (b)  Evaluation of marketing strategy & performance (Weighting = 60%)
    (c)  What lessons can be learned from this case (Weighting = 30%)
                                              
    Prepare a 15 minute presentation to give to the class allowing 5 minutes for questions


    Final Examination (Individual)

    The course will finish with a 2 hour case examination. You will be given the case to read two days before the examination. On arrival to class you will be given the case questions. The examination will be OPEN BOOK.
    Submission
    For written assignments both a hard and electronic copy of submissions is required. Electronic submissions should be in Word or PDF format.

    Presentation of Assignments
    · Please must retain a copy of all assignments submitted.
    · Please attach an ‘Assignment Cover Sheet’, which is signed and dated by you before submission.
    · All group assignments must be attached to a ‘Group Assignment Cover Sheet’, which must be signed and dated by all group members before submission.  All team members are expected to contribute approximately equally to a group assignment.

    Lecturers can refuse to accept assignments,which do not have a signed acknowledgement of the University’s policy onplagiarism.

    Assignment Guidelines including Referencing Details
    A copy of the Postgraduate Programs: Communication Skills Guide will have been given to you at the beginning of your program.  This guide will assist you structure your assignments.  A copy of the guide can also be downloaded from http://www.adelaide.edu.au/professions/hub/downloads/MBA-Communication-Skills-Guide.pdf

    This publication also provides guidelines on a range of other important communication skills including writing essays and management reports, making oral presentations etc.

    In preparing any written piece of assessment for your postgraduate studies it is important to draw on the relevant ‘literature’ to support critical analysis. Also essential is to reference the literature used. Correct referencing is important because it identifies the source of the ideas and arguments that you present, and sometimes the source of the actual words you use, and helps to avoid the problem of plagiarism. (Further information on plagiarism is provided later in this course outline.) The Harvard system is widely used in the Business School. Guidelines for the use of this style of referencing can be found in the Communication Skills Guide.

    Further assistance with referencing is available from the Faculty’s Learning Support Advisors. The contact details are provided on page 6 of the Communication Skills Guide.

    Late Assignment Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system.  Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date.  Each request will be assessed on its merits.  A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late.


    Return of Assignments
    Lecturer’s aim to mark and return assignments to students within two (2) weeks of the due date with written feedback.  Students are responsible for collecting their marked assignments from either their tutorials or lectures. If assignments aren’t collected after two (2) weeks, the assignments will be available at the Student Hub for two (2) weeks. The remaining assignments will only be posted out to the students, if the correct mailing addresses are on the assignments.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the
    following scheme: MS8

    MS8
    Grade Description
    HD
    85-100%
    Exceptional performance indicating complete and comprehensive understanding of the course matter; genuine mastery of relevant skills; demonstration of an extremely high level of interpretative and analytical ability and intellectual initiative; and achievement of all major and minor objectives of the course.
    D
    75-84%
    Excellent performance indicating a very high level of understanding of the course matter; development of relevant skills to a very high level; demonstration of a very high level of interpretive and analytical ability and intellectual initiative; and achievement of all major
    and minor objectives of the course.
    C
    65-74%
    Good performance indicating a high level of understanding of course matter; development of relevant skills to a high level; demonstration of a high level of interpretive and analytical ability and achievement of all major objectives of the course; some minor objectives not fully achieved.
    P
    50-64%
    Satisfactory performance indicating an adequate understanding of most of the basic course matter; partial development of relevant skills; adequate interpretive and analytical ability and achievement of most major objectives of the course; failure to achieve some minor objectives.


    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/results.html

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is
    expected at each grade level (see: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/700/ )


    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as CEQ surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes.  Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/ ), course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at least once every 2 years. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g.
    MyUni).  In addition aggregated course SELT data can be found at:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/selt/aggregates
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  • Policies & Guidelines
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    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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