HIST 3038 - Aftermath: Aborigines in 20th Century Australia

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

Prior to colonisation of the continent of Australia there were some 250 pre-existing Aboriginal cultural and language groups who had successfully maintained sustainable lifeways which had a symbiotic relationship with the land, the environment, the cosmos. Following the 'frontier' period when many of these lifeways were disrupted or destroyed, the twentieth century was a time of consolidation of the nation as 'Australia'. It was also a time when Aboriginal Australians continued the struggles for social and political recognition as equal peoples of the nation. The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Aboriginal experiences of life in twentieth century Australia. It explores a broad range of topics which were/are of continued significance to Aboriginal people. Central to the Course is the academic and socio-political positioning of the Aboriginal experience in relation to discussions on government policies, institutionalisation, Aboriginal art and literature, and Aboriginal political movements. Through a range of tasks including independent research, small group discovery workshops and engagement with external primary document repositories students will develop an informed critical understanding of the experiences of Aboriginal Australians and the impact of that history on contemporary Aboriginal populations. Students will also be engaged in developing a working knowledge of Indigenous research methodologies and the ethical requirements when writing on or researching about and with Aboriginal people as set out in National Ethics guidelines. A targeted course outcome is that students will develop skills in articulating that knowledge in everyday practice.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3038
    Course Aftermath: Aborigines in 20th Century Australia
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Incompatible HIST 2070
    Course Description Prior to colonisation of the continent of Australia there were some 250 pre-existing Aboriginal cultural and language groups who had successfully maintained sustainable lifeways which had a symbiotic relationship with the land, the environment, the cosmos. Following the 'frontier' period when many of these lifeways were disrupted or destroyed, the twentieth century was a time of consolidation of the nation as 'Australia'. It was also a time when Aboriginal Australians continued the struggles for social and political recognition as equal peoples of the nation. The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Aboriginal experiences of life in twentieth century Australia. It explores a broad range of topics which were/are of continued significance to Aboriginal people. Central to the Course is the academic and socio-political positioning of the Aboriginal experience in relation to discussions on government policies, institutionalisation, Aboriginal art and literature, and Aboriginal political movements. Through a range of tasks including independent research, small group discovery workshops and engagement with external primary document repositories students will develop an informed critical understanding of the experiences of Aboriginal Australians and the impact of that history on contemporary Aboriginal populations. Students will also be engaged in developing a working knowledge of Indigenous research methodologies and the ethical requirements when writing on or researching about and with Aboriginal people as set out in National Ethics guidelines. A targeted course outcome is that students will develop skills in articulating that knowledge in everyday practice.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jenni Caruso

    Jennifer Caruso
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Recognise the value of a wide range of methodologies, conceptual approaches and the impact of competing narratives.

    2. Show sensitivity to the diversity of historical cultures and the ethical implications of historical enquiry within a global context.

    3. Think independently and critically, using appropriate methodologies and technologies, to engage with historical problems.

    4. Communicate effectively in a range of spoken and written formats, within the conventions of history.

    5. Be able to locate, identify and analyse relevant primary and secondary sources in order to construct evidence based arguments.

    6. Possess a broad body of historical knowledge ranging over time, space and cultures.

    7. Contribute productively to group-based activities.

    8. Demonstrate the skills of an historian which are appropriate for performing a range of professional roles, undertaking leadership positions, and sustaining lifelong learning, including: information technology skills to manage data and to communicate, skills in collaborative and self-directed problem-solving, a habit of academic rigour, and sensitivity to intercultural and ethical issues.

    9. Demonstrate a critical, self-reflective approach to the study of history, based on respect and mutual responsibility.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4,7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no 'required resources' that need to be purchased for this Course. All readings will be posted on Canvas in weekly folders.
    Recommended Resources
    Students will need to access and download the following Ethics Protocols documents for working with, researching and writing about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    NHMRC Values and Ethics:Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research: https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-ethics/ethical-issues-and-further-resources/ethical-guidelines-research-involving-aboriginal-

    https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/e52.pdf

    AIATSIS Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies: http://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/docs/research-and-guides/ethics/gerais.pdf

    FLINDERS UNIVERSITY Appropriate Terminology, Representations and Protocols of Acknowledgement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: https://www.flinders.edu.au/staff-development-files/CDIP%20documents/CDIP%20Toolkit%202015/2_%20Appropriate%20Terminology,%20Indigenous%20Australians.pdf
    Online Learning
    Course notes and PowerPoint presentations will be uploaded to Canvas, as well as any announcements or relevant information.
    Students will need to consult it regularly for updates, lecture notes and additional resources.

    The University has access to a number of academic journals that have full text articles available online. Use of the 'Informit' and 'APIAS' (APA-FT) databases on the Library’s catalogue will be required to locate articles which will assist in essay writing and further knowledge of the topic.

    All lectures will be recorded and accessable to all enrolled students.

    Assessments will be administered through Canvas and Turnitin - students will receive detailed feedback on their assignments through these media.

    Throughout the Course students will access primary source and archival databases for information relevant to assessment. This will be guided by the Course coordinator and through State Library Aboriginal Resource Officers.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    This Course is delivered through contact times in Lectures and Seminars.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 1 hour lecture                    12 hours per semester
    per week

    1 x 2 hour seminar                  24 hours per semester
    per week


    WORKLOAD – SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING

    4 hours reading per                  48  hours per semester
    week

    4 hours research                      48 hours per semester
    per week

    2 hours
    assignment/presentation
    preparation per week               24 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary

    WEEK

    1
    Introduction to Course, appropriate terminology, appropriate research methods
    Seminar: Aboriginal Australia pre-colonisation

    2
    Constructions of the nation of Australia prior to federation, development of policies on Aborigines; discussion on the white Australia policy
    Seminar: commencing outline of assessment projects

    3
    Investigating the role of missions and the policies of protection & control of Aboriginal people in the period 1901-1930s
    Seminar: discussion on the Ethics approaches to writing on/about Aboriginal people

    4
    Discussions on the forms of Aboriginal labour in the pastoral industry, the issues of rations and supply,
    Seminar: Learning activity focusing on research topics and how to approach a research proposal using culturally
    informed language and research methods

    5
    Examination of the role of anthropology and western science across the 20C in the categorisation of Aboriginal Australians
    Seminar: The impacts in the form of assimilation.

    6
    Library resources seminar; formulation of research question
    Seminar: finding relevant sources for research question

    7
    Presentation from the stolen generations
    Seminar: 20C emergence of Aboriginal Activism

    8
    1967 Referendum, self-determination; Native title;
    Seminar: research assessment task

    9
    Stanner’s ‘great Australian silence’; ‘the history wars’;
    Seminar: critical analysis of differing academic views ‘Aboriginal’ in Australian history;

    10
    Indigenous voices in the academy Indigenous academic writings/methodologies
    Seminar: presentations


    11
    The International decade of Indigenous peoples; the Royal commission into Aboriginal Deaths in custody
    Seminar: presentations

    12
    The ‘new’ century; conclusion


    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will engage in small group group analysis and reporting against allocated readings/topic areas. They'll also undertake group-driven library searches and interactions with the Indigenous Records officer of the State Records, as well as other group and independent research activities. All of these will be aligned to the development of written assessment pieces.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Tutorial attendance & participation 10%
    Research proposal (1500 word) 30%
    Seminar presentation (1000 word) 20%
    Ethics application (2000 word) 40%
    Assessment Related Requirements

    It is expected that at this Level students will need to engage in comprehensive self/group directed learning ensuring a more comprehensive understanding of research/writing/study in the area of Aboriginal peoples and histories in preparation for possible further study in this field of knowledge, or as a means for employment across a range of sectors including education, government and industry.

    While assessment tasks are individual, students will engage in small group activities in Seminar times to work on research proposals and ethics applications. To the greater extent the first hour of the Seminar will be facilitated on campus, with students forming groups to share information and to discuss the lecture/readings contents in order to build knowledge specific to the Course Learning outcomes. It is envisaged that for the second half of seminar times, students will work individually in the Library or in State Records on sourcing information for their assessment tasks. Arrangements are being made with State Records staff to enable group or individual visits.

    Assessment Detail

    ASSESSMENT TASK TASK TYPE WEIGHTING          COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES
    Tutorial attendance and participation  Formative and summative 10% 4, 7
    1500 word ‘research proposal’ Summative 30% 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
    1000 word tutorial presentation Formative and summative    20% 1, 2, 4, 7
    2000 word ‘ethics application’ Summative 40% 5, 8, 9

    Tutorial attendance and participation: each week students will undertake setreadings which will form the basis of small group discussion during seminar times. Seminar times will also be allocated for individual and group preparation for the research assignments. Work during seminars will be to the greatest part be students driven, with both individual and small group discovery. 10% weighting.  

    Seminar Presentation: students will share and discuss their individual research proposals to assist with development and
    progression of the proposal. Broad questions aimed at guiding analysis of possible topics will be provided. The presentation notes and power point will be submitted for assessment (notes: 1000 words + slides). 20% weighting.

    Research Proposal: students will submit a mock ‘research proposal focusing on a specific research topic of their choosing
    drawn from Course Content. 30% weighting.

    Ethics Application – students will submit a ‘mock’ ethics application for their research proposal tying together the knowledge gained throughout the Course on research and ethics protocols required when working/researching on or with Indigenous Australians. 40% weighting.

    Submission
    Submission will be electronic through Canvas and Turnitin.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Assessment results will be made available through Access Adelaide and Canvas
  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and
    teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from
    students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff,
    the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of
    Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program
    reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual
    teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and
    program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how
    effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate
    student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy
    (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and
    must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for
    every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT
    surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources
    (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.
  • Student Support
    Academic Support with MathsAcademic Support with writing and speaking skillsCounselling Service - Personal counselling for issues affecting studyInternational Student Care - Ongoing supportStudent Care - Advocacy, confidential counselling, welfare support and adviceStudents with a Disability - Alternative academic arrangements Reasonable Adjustments to Teaching & Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy



    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is
    sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff and eSELTS. These are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement
    and learning outcomes. Under the current eSELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/ ) course SELTs are
    mandated and must be conducted at least once every 2 years. Feedback on issues raised through course eSELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources . In addition aggregated course eSELT
    data can be found at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/selt/aggregates/


  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines. all university policies can be obtained from: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/

    Academic Credit Arrangement PolicyAcademic Honesty PolicyAcademic Progress by Coursework Students PolicyAssessment for Coursework ProgramsCopyright Compliance PolicyCoursework Academic Programs PolicyElder Conservatorium of Music Noise Management PlanModified Arrangements for Coursework AssessmentStudent Experience of Learning and Teaching PolicyStudent Grievance Resolution Process

    Occupational Health and Safety School of Humanities contingency plan & emergency procedures
    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs

    Academic Support

    Maths, writing and speaking skills http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/students/
     
    Counselling Service Personal counselling for issues affecting study http://www.adelaide.edu.au/counselling_centre/
     
    Essay coversheet Coversheet for all History assignments
    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/students/undergraduate/resources.html
     
    International Student Care Ongoing support
    http://www.international.adelaide.edu.au/support/isc/
     
    Student Care Advocacy, confidential counselling, welfare support and advice
    http://www.auu.org.au/site/page.cfm?u=69
     
    Students with a Disability Alternative academic arrangements
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/disability/
     
    Alternative Examination Arrangements Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/63/
     
    Reasonable Adjustments to Teaching & Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/64/
     






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