HIST 3038 - Aftermath: Aborigines in 20th Century Australia

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2018

Prior to colonisation of the continent of Australia there were some 250 pre-existing Aboriginal cultural and language groups who had successfully maintained sustainable lifeways which had a symbiotic relationship with the land, the environment, the cosmos. Following the 'frontier' period when many of these lifeways were disrupted or destroyed, the twentieth century was a time of consolidation of the nation as 'Australia'. It was also a time when Aboriginal Australians continued the struggles for social and political recognition as equal peoples of the nation. The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Aboriginal experiences of life in twentieth century Australia. It explores a broad range of topics which were/are of continued significance to Aboriginal people. Central to the Course is the academic and socio-political positioning of the Aboriginal experience in relation to discussions on government policies, institutionalisation, Aboriginal art and literature, and Aboriginal political movements. Through a range of tasks including independent research, small group discovery workshops and engagement with external primary document repositories students will develop an informed critical understanding of the experiences of Aboriginal Australians and the impact of that history on contemporary Aboriginal populations. Students will also be engaged in developing a working knowledge of Indigenous research methodologies and the ethical requirements when writing on or researching about and with Aboriginal people as set out in National Ethics guidelines. A targeted course outcome is that students will develop skills in articulating that knowledge in everyday practice.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3038
    Course Aftermath: Aborigines in 20th Century Australia
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Incompatible HIST 2070
    Course Description Prior to colonisation of the continent of Australia there were some 250 pre-existing Aboriginal cultural and language groups who had successfully maintained sustainable lifeways which had a symbiotic relationship with the land, the environment, the cosmos. Following the 'frontier' period when many of these lifeways were disrupted or destroyed, the twentieth century was a time of consolidation of the nation as 'Australia'. It was also a time when Aboriginal Australians continued the struggles for social and political recognition as equal peoples of the nation. The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Aboriginal experiences of life in twentieth century Australia. It explores a broad range of topics which were/are of continued significance to Aboriginal people. Central to the Course is the academic and socio-political positioning of the Aboriginal experience in relation to discussions on government policies, institutionalisation, Aboriginal art and literature, and Aboriginal political movements. Through a range of tasks including independent research, small group discovery workshops and engagement with external primary document repositories students will develop an informed critical understanding of the experiences of Aboriginal Australians and the impact of that history on contemporary Aboriginal populations. Students will also be engaged in developing a working knowledge of Indigenous research methodologies and the ethical requirements when writing on or researching about and with Aboriginal people as set out in National Ethics guidelines. A targeted course outcome is that students will develop skills in articulating that knowledge in everyday practice.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jenni Caruso

    Jennifer Caruso
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Recognise the value of a wide range of methodologies, conceptual approaches and the impact of competing narratives.

    2. Show sensitivity to the diversity of historical cultures and the ethical implications of historical enquiry within a global context.

    3. Think independently and critically, using appropriate methodologies and technologies, to engage with historical problems.

    4. Communicate effectively in a range of spoken and written formats, within the conventions of history.

    5. Be able to locate, identify and analyse relevant primary and secondary sources in order to construct evidence based arguments.

    6. Possess a broad body of historical knowledge ranging over time, space and cultures.

    7. Contribute productively to group-based activities.

    8. Demonstrate the skills of an historian which are appropriate for performing a range of professional roles, undertaking leadership positions, and sustaining lifelong learning, including: information technology skills to manage data and to communicate, skills in collaborative and self-directed problem-solving, a habit of academic rigour, and sensitivity to intercultural and ethical issues.

    9. Demonstrate a critical, self-reflective approach to the study of history, based on respect and mutual responsibility.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4,7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no 'required resources' that need to be purchased for this Course. All readings will be posted on Canvas in weekly folders.
    Recommended Resources
    Students will need to access and download the following Ethics Protocols documents for working with, researching and writing about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

    NHMRC Values and Ethics:Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research: https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-ethics/ethical-issues-and-further-resources/ethical-guidelines-research-involving-aboriginal-

    https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/publications/attachments/e52.pdf

    AIATSIS Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies: http://aiatsis.gov.au/sites/default/files/docs/research-and-guides/ethics/gerais.pdf

    FLINDERS UNIVERSITY Appropriate Terminology, Representations and Protocols of Acknowledgement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: https://www.flinders.edu.au/staff-development-files/CDIP%20documents/CDIP%20Toolkit%202015/2_%20Appropriate%20Terminology,%20Indigenous%20Australians.pdf
    Online Learning
    Course notes and PowerPoint presentations will be uploaded to Canvas, as well as any announcements or relevant information.
    Students will need to consult it regularly for updates, lecture notes and additional resources.

    The University has access to a number of academic journals that have full text articles available online. Use of the 'Informit' and 'APIAS' (APA-FT) databases on the Library’s catalogue will be required to locate articles which will assist in essay writing and further knowledge of the topic.

    All lectures will be recorded and accessable to all enrolled students.

    Assessments will be administered through Canvas and Turnitin - students will receive detailed feedback on their assignments through these media.

    Throughout the Course students will access primary source and archival databases for information relevant to assessment. This will be guided by the Course coordinator and through State Library Aboriginal Resource Officers.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This Course consists of face-to-face teaching on campus with 2 x 1 hr lectures and 1 x 1 hr tutorial per week.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will be expected to devote approximately 12 hours per week to this Course (divided over the semester). This consists of 2 x 1 hour lectures and 1 x 1 hour tutorial/seminar per week, and 9 hours per week on independent study, during which time students will prepare for tutorials/seminars and work on assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Through a range of tasks such as primary document research, tutorial/seminar discussions/presentations students will develop an informed critical understanding of the experiences of Aboriginal Australians and the impacts of that history on contemporary Aboriginal populations. Students will also develop a working knowledge of Indigenous research methodologies and the ethical requirements when writing on or researching about and with Aboriginal people as set out in National Ethics guidelines. A targeted Course outcome is that students will develop skills in articulating that knowledge in everyday practice and demonstrate that knowledge aquisition through written work.
    Specific Course Requirements
    At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Students will engage in Small Group Discovery Experience through development of Ethics/Research Essay. Teams will investigate the availabilty of, and access to, primary archival documents.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessable components for this Course are as follows: Tutorial attendance and Participation, a Research Proposal, Small Group Activity/Tutorial Presentation, and a Research Essay. The Research Proposal will give students the opportunity to become familiar with the essay writing requirements of the Department of History and provide an opportunity for discussion on appropriate research methods in Aboriginal studies. The tutorial presentations/small group activity around research ethics will enable students to focus on a specific topic and to lead discussions. The Research Essay will enable students to demonstrate their skills in working with primary documentation, and to discuss and analyse government policies, Aboriginal literature and art, rights to land, institutionalisation and political movements, etc.

    Assessment Related Requirements
    Individual reading and research will become evident in the Assessment tasks. Students are encouraged to become familiar with the Barr Smith Library and History Research Librarian, as well as developing relationships with State Records and State Library Staff.
    Assessment Detail
    Research proposal (1,500 words) - 30%
    Small Group Activity/Tutorial presentation (approx. 1,000 words) - 20%
    Ethics Research Essay (approx. 2,000 words) - 40%
    Tutorial attendance & participation - 10%

    Submission
    All assignments are to be submitted electronically via MyUni. The course coordinator will provide instructions about how to do this.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.


     

    Higher Distinction

    (85% or more)

    Distinction

    (75% to 84%)

    Credit

    (65% to 74%)

    Pass

    (50% to 64%)

    Structure

    The structure facilitates the clear and compelling development of the analysis.

    The structure is clear and facilitates the development of the analysis, though in places it could be improved.

    The structure is generally clear but it also contains flaws that impede the development of the analysis.

    The structure is confused and/or hinders the analysis, but not to the extent that the argument is overwhelmed.

    Analysis

    The essay is thoroughly analytical. There will usually be a degree of originality that goes beyond the mere paraphrasing of the ideas of other historians.

    The essay is mostly analytical, though there may be some deviation and/or brief lapses into narrative.

    The essay answers the question, though the argument may not always be persuasive. In places there may be deviation or lapses into narrative description.

    The essay only partially answers the question and there is a substantial degree of deviation and/or extended lapses into narrative description.

    Knowledge

    The range of reading implied by the answer will be extensive. There are no inaccuracies.

    The essay shows a sound knowledge of the topic, though there may be some gaps and a few inaccuracies.

    The essay shows a basic knowledge of the topic, though there may be major gaps and a degree of inaccuracy.

    Knowledge is patchy, but the student has enough information at his/her disposal to frame at least a basic answer.

    Evidence

    Analytical points are always supported by relevant factual evidence. The student is aware of the problematic nature of historical evidence and uses it judiciously.

    Analytical points are usually supported by relevant evidence. In places evidence may be taken at face value and/or used inappropriately.

    The essay tends either (a) to make sweeping statements, or (b) to deploy a significant amount of factual data that is not tied to relevant analysis. Evidence tends to be used uncritically.

    The essay suffers from either (a) a chronic lack of supporting evidence or (b) a mass of information with little or no regard to the demands of the question. Evidence is used uncritically.

    Prose

    The prose is crystal clear, accurate, and stylish. The student demonstrates a thorough grasp of the advanced vocabulary and idiom used by historians.

    The prose is generally clear and accurate, and will demonstrate at least an appreciation of the idiom and advanced vocabulary used by historians.

    Though the prose is generally clear and mostly accurate, there may be substantial problems with spelling or punctuation, but not with basic grammar.

    The prose contains substantial inaccuracy and/or lack of clarity. However, the prose is good enough for the basic meaning to be clear.

    Presentation

    The presentation of the essay is excellent. Full and accurate references are supplied, along with a full bibliography. The formatting will conform in every respect to the specified style.

    The presentation of the essay is generally good. References are supplied when needed, though there may be some minor formatting errors.

    The presentation of the essay is satisfactory but there are significant problems. References may not be supplied when needed, and there may be substantial errors in the formatting of references.

    The presentation of the essay is sloppy and there are substantial problems with the references. However, there is no intentional plagiarism

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and
    teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from
    students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff,
    the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of
    Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program
    reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual
    teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and
    program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how
    effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate
    student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy
    (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and
    must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for
    every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT
    surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources
    (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.
  • Student Support
    Academic Support with MathsAcademic Support with writing and speaking skillsCounselling Service - Personal counselling for issues affecting studyInternational Student Care - Ongoing supportStudent Care - Advocacy, confidential counselling, welfare support and adviceStudents with a Disability - Alternative academic arrangements Reasonable Adjustments to Teaching & Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy



    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is
    sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff and eSELTS. These are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement
    and learning outcomes. Under the current eSELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/ ) course SELTs are
    mandated and must be conducted at least once every 2 years. Feedback on issues raised through course eSELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources . In addition aggregated course eSELT
    data can be found at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/selt/aggregates/


  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines. all university policies can be obtained from: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/

    Academic Credit Arrangement PolicyAcademic Honesty PolicyAcademic Progress by Coursework Students PolicyAssessment for Coursework ProgramsCopyright Compliance PolicyCoursework Academic Programs PolicyElder Conservatorium of Music Noise Management PlanModified Arrangements for Coursework AssessmentStudent Experience of Learning and Teaching PolicyStudent Grievance Resolution Process

    Occupational Health and Safety School of Humanities contingency plan & emergency procedures
    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs

    Academic Support

    Maths, writing and speaking skills http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/students/
     
    Counselling Service Personal counselling for issues affecting study http://www.adelaide.edu.au/counselling_centre/
     
    Essay coversheet Coversheet for all History assignments
    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/students/undergraduate/resources.html
     
    International Student Care Ongoing support
    http://www.international.adelaide.edu.au/support/isc/
     
    Student Care Advocacy, confidential counselling, welfare support and advice
    http://www.auu.org.au/site/page.cfm?u=69
     
    Students with a Disability Alternative academic arrangements
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/disability/
     
    Alternative Examination Arrangements Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/63/
     
    Reasonable Adjustments to Teaching & Assessment for Students with a Disability Policy
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/64/
     






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